Note: The database is currently beeing reworked. To have a most consistent data set we are revisiting all 900 entries. The database will gradually be updated.

  • Design and development of 3D printed analogue prosthesis using generative generative design.

    Manttan, Gregory

    HSLU D&K

    2019

    HSLU D&K, 2019

    Abstract
    There are many advantages to the application of generative design to many different technical fields. In the case of prosthesis, generative design will be applied to complex forming material to the surface area of the remaining limb to create the advantage of perfect fit and function, reducing sweating, increasing comfort and usability. This solution will be used in conjunction with analogue "tools" for the user to combine into their lives, reducing task difficulty with the goal of increasing quality of life for people with amputation or dysmelie. The application of this generative design method will also be applied to the creation of corrective orthotics.

    Course of Study
    HSLU Master Design

    Tutors
    Dr Jan Eckert

  • Mode Mythe

    Jemmely, Virginie

    HEAD

    2019

    HEAD, 2019

    Abstract
    La structure de mon texte évoque mon parcours et mon rapport au départ difficile à l’écriture, à la mise en mots. Pour pallier à cette difficulté de l’écriture, je me suis donc appuyée sur le texte de Sonia Rykiel, afin d'approfondir certaines notions faisant parties intégrantes de mon travail pratique. J’y aborde le sujet de l’identité multiple, fragmentée et fluctuante ainsi que des confrontations intérieures que cela implique. J’évoque l’idée de superficialité versus la profondeur en abaissant les barrières hiérarchiques tête-corps. Puis, j’explique la notion de la démode de Rykiel, qui rend à la femme son pouvoir: La démode c’est le prolongement du corps, de l’être, de l’envie. Ce commencement se termine avec la question de la production de soi à travers le design et de la relation symbiotique mais ambivalente entre créateur et créature. En seconde partie pour «Le vêtement-talisman» j’ai prolongé le texte de Rykiel afin de le faire entrer en résonance avec ma pratique; j’y mêle également un texte de Susan Sontag. Je parle de la production de soi à travers le vêtement, le considérant comme étant une prolongation de l’envie d’être. La mode-mythe permet “d’être en jouant un rôle” en espérant le devenir. Dans ce processus le vêtement encodé peut être considéré comme un talisman nous rajoutant x ou y valeurs afin de devenir qui l’on aspire! Enfin, en dernière partie, «La muse parle», je parle seule, je «nais» en quelque sorte, tout en gardant en moi les traces de Rykiel et de Sontag. Ce processus fait écho à mon propos: l’idée que l’on emprunte à des figures que l’on admire un effet, un accessoire, un style, le combinant à d’autres.

    Course of Study
    HEAD Master Media Design

    Tutors
    Aude Fellay

    File
    1-MODE-MYTHE.pdf

  • WG- Kitchen

    fu, dongya

    HSLU D&K

    2019

    HSLU D&K, 2019

    Abstract
    A large number of students, staff, etc. live in large cities, most of them live in shared houses. Everyone uses public space together. Especially the kitchen is closely connected with everyone's life and health. At the same time, in a shared life, There are also many problems. How to avoid conflicts, let everyone use the kitchen more effectively and improve everyone's quality of life, this is my focus.

    Course of Study
    HSLU Master Design

    Tutors
    Klaus Marek

  • Designer-as-author-books (title not definitive)

    Piguet, Pauline

    HKB

    2019

    HKB, 2019

    IMG 4313

    Abstract
    A research about the author position of graphic designer’s, especially when looking at graphic "designer-as-author-books” (often called "artists' book").

    Course of Study
    HKB MA Design

    Tutors
    Egija Inzule, Christoph Schifferli

  • Horoscope des Designers

    Turk, Seda

    HEAD

    2019

    HEAD, 2019

    Abstract
    1976 : Jeane Dixon Astrological Cookbook 1998: Jeane Dixon’s Horoscope for Dogs 1979: Jeane Dixon’s Do cats have ESP? 2019: Seda Turk’s Horoscope des Designers Horoscope des designers offers an analysis of the influence of astrology on the field of design. It was inspired by the clairvoyant and astrologist Jeane Dixon, who offers a study on cooking, but also on cats and dogs, from an astrologic point of view. There is the one about design she omitted to do...

    Course of Study
    HKB MA Design

    Tutors
    Alexandra Midal

  • Albert Hollenstein, from typography to creation from photocomposition to communication

    Brun, Benoit

    ECAL

    2019

    ECAL, 2019

    Hollenstein catalog
    Hollenstein portrait
    Hollenstein team

    Abstract
    Perceived as a “French” in Switzerland and a “Swiss” in France, it is the career path of this young typographer that is the subject of this memoire. It was simply because Albert Hollenstein had a taste for risk that he hitchhiked to Paris at the age of 23, as he said, less to conquer than to “be conquered”. A lover of adventure and continuous self-improvement, he repeated that we had to “do something as if it were the last day of our lives” at all costs. In 1930, he was born on the shores of Lake Lucerne in German-speaking Switzerland. In 1974, he disappeared, swallowed by the Mediterranean Sea, during his “boy scout” holidays, in the company of his two young children, under the Italian sky. Between these two dates, a life. A life devoted almost exclusively to his profession, to his team, to his dreams.... Dreams, he had some. Quantities. Dreams, he made them come true. In quantity. Failures too, but always he would leave with a new idea, a new enthusiasm. The same faith. The faith, the sacred fire, he carried them within him, he communicated them to those who approached him. Employees and customers. Working alongside him, cultivating his friendship, all felt that with him life would be full of unexpected events and risks, but oh so exciting. Driven by a demanding dynamic, no one knew where he was taking them, but they all accepted with passion to be led by this young leader whose influence gave them confidence. It made it possible to get the best out of it. Young apprentice typographer at Brünner in Lucerne at the age of 15, A typographer, who arrived in Paris at the age of 23, Founder of a graphic design team in “rue Germain-Pilon” in 1957, Pedagogue in the evening, in the cellar of his studio, teaching that “typography defines white, as architecture defines space”, Creator of the famous typeface “Brasilia”, At the beginning of Photo-Headline and the research for a less dry typography, At the birth of a new profession, an audiovisual artist, ... Here are the different aspects of Albert’s portrait, whom we can remember, a man of communication, a facilitator who knew how to differentiate himself because he always perceived the precursor message to be transmitted. “Learn to always move forward in a constant surpassing, without worrying about obstacles. Dare... If possible in Joy, even at the most difficult moment”.

    Course of Study
    ECAL Art Direction

    Tutors
    Wayne Daly and Roland Frueh

    File
    Benoit_Brun—Albert_Hollenstein.pdf

  • Modernising tradition

    Vučković, Eva

    HSLU D&K

    2019

    HSLU D&K, 2019

    Abstract
    This thesis works on modernising tradition using design ideas to bring traditional values closer to the contemporary society. Therefore, this thesis seeks to encourage younger generations in getting to know better their own past together with their ethnical authenticity in order to build stronger relationship between their origin and contemporaneity of the times they live in. The rest is TBD.

    Course of Study
    HSLU Master Design

    Tutors
    Jan Eckert

  • Tribute to Erich Tali — Reviving a Type Designer That Never Became

    Takk, Aimur

    ECAL

    2019

    ECAL, 2019

    Erich Tali Elurõõm The Joy of Life
    Erich Tali HEROIN
    Erich Tali Olid ajad The Times We Had

    Abstract
    How to revive typefaces that never existed? Or how to revive the legacy of a type designer that never became? These are the questions that charm me, while looking at hundreds of letterings by Erich Tali (1921–1990), that I happened to save from sending into trash. How did a sculptor end up working as a 'schrift-artist' for more than 30 years at the Estonian Television, painting title slides for most of the shows for the only TV channel broadcasted during Soviet occupation in Estonia and remaining unknown? How did the sociopolitical context and the censorship affect his practice? After interviewing few local designers and hearing comments, how these pieces were actually mediocre and outdated already when they were created, I was even more sure, that Erich's work needs a second chance. The idea is to define the artist's handwriting, as certain nuances and styles tend to recur. It might be possible to revive his model for constructing letterforms, without blindly copying the outlines, and use it as a basis for display and even text typefaces.

    Course of Study
    ECAL Art Direction

    Tutors
    Roland Früh, Wayne Daly and Matthieu Cortat

  • Old Rituals for Cyberspaces

    Battipaglia, Emidio

    ECAL

    2019

    ECAL, 2019

    Abstract
    This thesis wants to analyse the concept of liminality in cyberspace to explore a new ethnographic phenomenon of producing spaces through state-of-the-art technologies in contemporary photography practice. As David Tomas explains in the essay Old Rituals for New Space: Rites de Passage and William Gibson's Cultural Model of Cyberspace, science fiction is ‘an important tool that allow us to make sense of a rapidly emerging postindustrial culture’. Digital Image-Making systems operate as clearly structured, technically regulated spatiotemporal passages between the world of everyday human existence and a parallel world of pictorial representation. Cyberspace constitutes a spatial operator connecting pasts and futures through the present, and it allows us to make sense of an advanced information technology that has the potential to not only change the economic and social structures of human society but also overthrow the sensorial and organic architecture of the human body, by disembodying and repurposing its sensorium in digitalised spaces. Inspired by the anthropologists Arnold Van Gennep and Victor Turner this essay explains the significance of the liminal space an indicator of emphasising processes of social change. The term was first introduced in the book Le Rites de Passage (1909) by the ethnologist Arnold Van Gennep. A notable work of cultural anthropology, it was not until it was translated in English in 1960 – and later elaborated by the anthropologist Victor Turner – that the work received the attention it deserved and the terms ‘liminal’ and ‘liminality’ spread outside of the narrow anthropological field of studies. Turner appropriated and expanded the concept of liminality to represents a space where a large array of physical and non-physical transformations take place, a space where past and future identities overlap and interact and social structures forge. Rites of passage ceremonies can be considered socio-symbolic passageways for the movement of humans between distinct social categories or stages, often considered traumatic because they represent destabilising situations of transient existence that are outside of familiar social structures. However, since these rituals were analysed in the context of preindustrial societies, they have been identified with them, excluding scientific and technological processes when they have been associated with industrial societies. As a consequence, other fields of studies adopted the usage of the term liminality, adapting its inner qualities to explain other complex cultural phenomena. In particular, the concept of liminality nurtures especially well in media studies given its intrinsic nature of being ‘everywhere and nowhere’ and adapting to a multitude of forms and assemblages where Image-making systems operate as clearly structured, technically regulated spatiotemporal passages between the world of everyday human existence and a parallel world of pictorial representation. Analysing the work contemporary photography artists like Dominic Hawgood, Joe Hamilton, James Bridle, Felicity Hammond and Fabio Fornasari, whose fascination for the technological development characterizes their respective practice, I will address the in-between space where photography expands this vision across a new era of representation - interconnected by networks and CGI (computer generated imagery), VR (virtual reality), AR (augmented reality) and AI (artificial intelligence) - and becomes able to deliver artificial experiences much closer to reality, that could seamlessly blend and extend in the natural world, opening up a window on a post-Anthropocene era outlining the plies of our possible future(s).

    Course of Study
    ECAL Art Direction

    Tutors
    Gunti Claus

  • line to edge: lost in translation.

    Lodetti, Samuel

    ECAL

    2019

    ECAL, 2019

    Abstract
    “My job is to determine the outline of an object and to design something that fits right into it.” Mr. Fukasawa . This summer I visited a retrospective of Olivier Moset. While watching his monochromatic stroke less painting I was captured by the subtle pictorial stroke left on the edge of the frame less canvas. The 5 cm edge become the most important part of the 2×2 m painting, beacause their is the humanity of the artist shows. From this moment on Iwhen I saw this line, I started to question: ‘What is the importance of edges in objects?’. The edge is an omnipresent part of everydays object yet it often passes unseen. It has the capacity to describe the encounter of two surfaces. It is a moment full of energy which create a line. The line has a long history of representation, throught abstraction and drawing it has represented the worlds geography in maps. On this maps movement has been drawn on through lines, the line get the action. On an object the lineactivate the eye to slide on an object. There is a translation to the line an the physical world which happen in different field, from art to architecture and in the designprocess to. What I want to investigate is the translation of drawn lines in object.

    Course of Study
    HKB MA Design

    Tutors
    Annina Koivu, Brynjiar Sigurdarson

  • Empathic Communication in the Design Workplace

    Herrera, Antonio

    ZHdK

    2019

    ZHdK, 2019

    Abstract
    The focus of my project is to investigate empathic communication and employees’ working approaches in the design workplace. To do that, I plan to design empathic communication tools and also create a compendium with useful information of my investigation to generate resources for orientation and support in the workplace. The goal: to create a new role of the designer as a facilitator and a design process model to develop design projects while promoting empathic communication.

    Course of Study
    ZHdK Visual Communication

    Tutors
    Sarah Owens, Stefano Vannotti

    File
    EmpathicCommunication-DesignPoster_AntonioHerrera_ZHdK.pdf

  • Depicted – but Represented? (WT)

    Dieterich, Nike

    HKB

    2019

    HKB, 2019

    Abstract
    For my master thesis at the HKB in Bern I am currently developing a collaborative project dealing with the representation and perception of Egyptian women. Looking at the example of photography we want to analyze why the gap between self-perception and representation seems to be especially big.

    Course of Study
    HKB MA Design

    Tutors
    GhaliaElsrakbi, PriskaGisler

  • Digital Image & Disinformation: information dissemination as a strategy for political manipulation

    Serra, Ana

    HKB

    2019

    HKB, 2019

    Abstract
    Exploiting social media platforms and taking advantage of specific internet phenomena with the goal of manipulating public opinion has been, in the last few years, a very important tool in a political context. Organized groups affiliated with the state, study and manipulate the inner workings of information dissemination on social media. They infiltrate communities using fake accounts, gaining the targeted groups’ trust and spreading false information. Images play a big part in the process being the main transmitter of information. Analysing how these images are constructed and the motivation behind these events can help understand the problem.

    Course of Study
    HKB MA Design

    Tutors
    Ulrike Felsing

  • A glitch in the system

    Kuratli, Christa

    ZHdK

    2019

    ZHdK, 2019

    Abstract
    In our technological society, we are striving for perfection in (printed) images. However, who decides what perfection is? Not taking the given systems for granted and challenging them led us to many innovations. This project questions the existing camera and printing systems, breaks their self-imposed boarders and therefore creates new pictures through the beauty of imperfection.

    Course of Study
    ZHdK Visual Communication

    Tutors
    Sarah Owens

  • A Swiss outdoor company and its customer experience

    Steiner, Sandra

    HSLU D&K

    2019

    HSLU D&K, 2019

    Abstract
    My plan is to do my master project together with the Swiss outdoor company MAMMUT. Two years ago the company launched their online shop. Since then many customers have visited the site and bought their outdoor gear online. However, high tech outdoor gear often needs further explanation before people decide to spend a decent amount of money for it. Currently, customers browse without any guidance through hundreds of products on www.mammut.com. As a result, they feel lost and frustrated. Therefore, the aim of the master project is to analyze the current online customer journey. The findings should help to create a tool which guides the consumer through the shop, so that the experience over all can be improved.

    Course of Study
    HSLU Master Design

    Tutors
    No

  • *Deconstructing your Plate: investigating forms of design practice and mediation

    El Bakry, Mayar

    HKB

    2019

    HKB, 2019

    Abstract
    Food transcends borders, the story of excellent cuisine is the story of successful immigration and integration. The depth of taste correlates directly to the migration of communities and trade. If this is true for food, why can't it be valid for design? As a designer, I would like to look at the intersectionalities of aesthetics, social (decolonial and feminist), ecological, and economic discourse through food. My investigation and research are built on the premise that food is a nonverbal communication and facilitating medium. A medium for discussion and an interface to experience empathy. By using food as an accessible metaphor and platform we can help reassess the design canon and integrate these learnings in contemporary practices of design production, publication and meditation.

    Course of Study
    HKB MA Design

    Tutors
    Corinne Gisel, Nina Paim

  • Web platforms and new life cycle of vintage bicycles

    Theo, Francart

    HEAD

    2019

    HEAD, 2019

    1
    2
    3
    4
    5
    6
    7

    Abstract
    This thesis focuses on the capabilities of online digital platforms to assist life extension practices of pre-digital technical objects. To do this, I did a representative case study, around the vintage bike Peugeot Cycles.

    Course of Study
    HEAD Master Media Design

    Tutors
    Lysianne Lechot Hirt

  • Hystériques à bord !

    Bressoud, Sulliane

    HEAD

    2019

    HEAD, 2019

    Iconographie hystériques à bord 1
    Iconographie hystériques à bord 2
    Iconographie hystériques à bord 4
    Iconographie hystériques à bord 5
    Iconographie hystériques à bord 6
    Iconographie hystériques à bord 7

    Abstract
    Le 19ème siècle a vu la société, principalement en Europe, se transformer au cours de la révolution industrielle. Emblématiques de cette époque, les trains à vapeur ont été le vecteur de profonds bouleversements autant économiques que sociaux, mais les passagers sont aussi soumis à des dangers imprévisibles ; les catastrophes ferroviaires sont fréquentes. Certains rescapés, traumatisés par l’accident, souffraient de maux dont l’origine n’était pas encore identifiable et étaient alors parfois considérés comme hystériques. Est-ce que ces catastrophes ferroviaires, conséquences de l’industrialisation et de la modernité, ont-elles permis, par la démonstration de l’égalité de l’homme et de la femme face au traumatisme, une "déféminisation" du paradigme de l’hystérie jusqu’alors liée à des caractéristiques purement féminines?

    Course of Study
    HEAD Master in Design - Space and Communication

    Tutors
    Alexandra Midal

  • Narration Sonore, La place de l’audio dans le jeu vidéo

    Lansiaux, Léa

    HEAD

    2019

    HEAD, 2019

    Abstract
    Le "son" dans les jeux vidéo est un élément peu discuté dans la presse. Il est pourtant un élément centrale des médias audiovisuels. Mais de quel manière le son affecte la progression narrative dans les jeux vidéo? Tout d’abord, la narration dans le contexte vidéo ludique est particulière. Bien qu’on y trouve des éléments tels qu’un récit ou une intrigue, ils n’auront pas le même traitement que dans la littérature ou le cinéma. On peut aussi se trouver face à des univers où ces formes narratives sont absentes. Ici, la narration évoque la structure du récit, la façon de raconter un histoire et d’exposer une suite d’événements. Dans le jeu vidéo elle est spécifique car soumise aux actions du joueur. Le joueur co-créé les histoires, il est acteur et maître des choix narratives. Le gameplay prend donc une grande importance dans la façon d’explorer la narration. La part du son dans la narration se pose donc sur ses mécaniques. De plus, le sonore à de particuliers qu’il est multiple. Entre la musique, les voix et les bruits, l’hétérogénéité qui l’entoure rend complexe l’analyse de la relation audiovisuel. Le jeux vidéo a de spécifique que c'est un média interactif. Cette contrainte est à la source de nouvelles manières de penser le son. Pour comprendre la relation qu’il peut y avoir entre le son et la narration un corpus de 14 jeux est étudié, chacun dans leurs spécificités, afin de faire ressortir les éléments marquants en faveur d’une narration sonore.

    Course of Study
    HEAD Master Media Design

    Tutors
    Nicolas Nova

  • Memories of mediated reality

    Zybinska, Paulina

    ZHdK

    2019

    ZHdK, 2019

    Unnamed

    Abstract
    Memories are subject to many errors and distortions. By moulding the past into a believable fiction, it is possible to shape anyone’s mind by using memory flaws. Nowadays this knowledge is being misused by media and used to produce misinformation. The amount of it is immense, especially if we consider how much information is being filtered based on our beliefs. With the digital advancement, manipulation of facts has become even easier; in the age of ever-expanding computational potential, new tools which incorporate AI, AR and machine learning begin to blur the lines between the reality and fantasy. How easy will it be then to create a completely new history, a story of false reality?

    Course of Study
    ZHdK Interaction Design

    Tutors
    Björn Franke

  • How to find a more effective way to mitigate CO2 emissions in Switzerland besides the existing ways?

    Yu, Yan

    HKB

    2019

    HKB, 2019

    Abstract
    28 September 2019, there were around 100,000 people flocked to Bern to demand more climate protection in Switzerland. Never before have so many people taken to the streets in Switzerland for the climate. However, CO2 is the most significant long-lived greenhouse gas in Earth's atmosphere. Since the Industrial Revolution anthropogenic emissions – primarily from the use of fossil fuels and deforestation – have rapidly increased its concentration in the atmosphere, leading to global warming. Considering the vote of the swiss people for demanding more climate protection in Switzerland. Besides the existing way to reduce CO2 emissions, how can I find a more effective way to mitigate CO2 emissions from our individual's aspect?

    Course of Study
    HKB MA Design

    Tutors
    Ferdinand Vogler

  • Verbrechen. Wenn aus Macht Gewalt entsteht.

    Neff, Natalie

    HSLU D&K

    2019

    HSLU D&K, 2019

    Abstract
    Das Rechtssystem sieht eine Gesellschaftsordnung vor, welche mithilfe der Staatsgewalt überwacht und durchgesetzt wird. Die Ausübung dieser Gewaltform gegen unerwünschte Gewalt kann soziale Gruppen sowohl immens einschränken als auch aufblühen lassen. Unterdrückung und Machtmissbrauch auf der einen, die Förderung der Produktivität und Sicherheit auf der anderen Seite sind Punkte, welche in meinem Projekt aufgegriffen werden. Komplexe Sachverhalte wie Sicherheit, Bestrafung, Gerechtigkeit, Racial Profiling u.a. werden kritisch untersucht und durch Diskussionen mit Betroffenen ergänzt. Die Thematik soll der breiten Öffentlichkeit auf gestalterische Weise erklärt werden und bestenfalls zum selbständigen Reflektieren anstossen.

    Course of Study
    HSLU Master Design

    Tutors
    Jan Eckert

  • What is Truth? Living in a machine reality

    Paternostre, Hugo

    ECAL

    2019

    ECAL, 2019

    Abstract
    Pictures, videos, audio records, etc.. have always been considered as an evidence of something that happened at a certain time. Those differents mediums contains datas that can be manipulated and question a context, people or even History. From the comitted crime to the forensics analyses, the manipulation of those sources always aimed to fake or confirm a true fact. Recently the introduction of AI used through different softwares speeded thing up even more, so that today everyone is able to create fake sources, fake realities, real consequences. This research is an overview of the existing situation and the impact of ‘‘images’’ manipulation on our notion of truth. If everything can be manipulated, how should we think in a fast moving world made of fake realities that constantly need to be requestionned? Are we reaching the edge where the only last evidences are physical?

    Course of Study
    ECAL Product Design

    Tutors
    Anniina Koivu & Brynjar Sigurdarson

  • What is Truth? Living in a machine reality

    Paternostre, Hugo

    ECAL

    2019

    ECAL, 2019

    Abstract
    Pictures, videos, audio records, etc.. have always been considered as an evidence of something that happened at a certain time. Those differents mediums contains datas that can be manipulated and question a context, people or even History. From the comitted crime to the forensics analyses, the manipulation of those sources always aimed to fake or confirm a true fact. Recently the introduction of AI used through different softwares speeded thing up even more, so that today everyone is able to create fake sources, fake realities, real consequences. This research is an overview of the existing situation and the impact of ‘‘images’’ manipulation on our notion of truth. If everything can be manipulated, how should we think in a fast moving world made of fake realities that constantly need to be requestionned? Are we reaching the edge where the only last evidences are physical?

    Course of Study
    HKB MA Design

    Tutors
    Anniina Koivu & Brynjar Sigurdarson

  • Art-ificial

    Schönbächler, Julian

    ZHdK

    2019

    ZHdK, 2019

    Schoenbaechler Julian Projektdispo2019 Bild

    Abstract
    Eine technische Herangehensweise zur Definition von visuellen Grafikstilen im virtuellen Raum. Die Arbeit befasst sich mit der Erzeugung von grafischen Effekten und visuellen Darstellungsmethoden im virtuellen Raum. Dabei geht es um das Erkunden von verschiedenen Techniken, welche stildefinierend in virtuellen Medien wirken können. Vor allem kleinere Game-Studios, welche nur über eine begrenzte Anzahl an Designern und Entwicklern verfügen, oder aber auch die Budgetlimite im Auge behalten müssen, können nur begrenzt Ressourcen für die Entwicklung im grafischen Bereich eines digitalen Spiels einsetzen. Das führt sehr oft zu recht einfachen, grafisch nicht sonderlich ansprechbaren Resultaten. Eine technische Herangehensweise in diesem Bereich kann die jeweiligen Teams dabei unterstützen, neue und einzigartige visuelle Stile zu kreieren und bietet eine Alternative zur Erstellung von aufwendig modellierten 3D Objekten, sowie aber auch handgezeichneten Texturen.

    Course of Study
    ZHdK Game Design

    Tutors
    René Bauer, Mela Kocher

  • The Joux Valley; which potential for a social economy system based on local craftsmanship

    Roy, Fabien

    ECAL

    2019

    ECAL, 2019

    Small size 2
    Small size

    Abstract
    The vernacular heritage refers to the characteristic elements of the history of daily life and practices from a local and popular culture. Understanding this topic is a fundamental aspect of architectural practice. It is also valid for any design approach that tends to be part of a specific social, economic and cultural environment. Taking into account this vernacularity may be relevant in the context of our contemporary societal issues. Thinking locally, using natural resources and valorising specific know-how seems to be valuable today. Based on craftsmanship or semi-industrial production, some social enterprises involved into small communities have emerged these last years all around the world. Nevertheless, by relying only on these aspects to grow a healthy economic model in the field of product design may raise some questions. Indeed, we can ask us if architecture and design can be compared with the same relation to the vernacularity? Does a product will survive out of its context? What about the opposition between vernacularity and world globalization? This memoire, based on The Joux Valley case study, propose some reflexions about the topic. Nestled in the Jura Massif in Switzerland, this region reveals a unique microcosm in which specific know-how in craftsmanship have been developed. The result is objects, tools and architectures stripped of any ornament that meet the functional needs of everyday life.

    Course of Study
    ECAL Product Design

    Tutors
    Anniina Koivu, Brynjar Sigurðarson

  • Origami structure and the applied in product design

    zhang, jingxiang

    ECAL

    2019

    ECAL, 2019

    Natural Folding Patterns Illustration of Force Matter the geometric relationship png

    Abstract
    Origami is the art of paper folding Japan, and now it becomes a design language in different areas such as architecture, furniture, product, graphic, sculpture, fashion, and even food industry. In this paper, I will focus on several origami patterns and their interactive movement. What’s the possibility of this form in the design world. How can this structure change our everyday object in different ways: Function, interaction, production, economic, and Eco.

    Course of Study
    ECAL Product Design

    Tutors
    Anniina Koivu, Brynjar Sigurðarson

  • Origami structure and the applied in product design

    zhang, jingxiang

    ECAL

    2019

    ECAL, 2019

    Natural Folding Patterns Illustration of Force Matter the geometric relationship png

    Abstract
    Origami is the art of paper folding Japan, and now it becomes a design language in different areas such as architecture, furniture, product, graphic, sculpture, fashion, and even food industry. In this paper, I will focus on several origami patterns and their interactive movement. What’s the possibility of this form in the design world. How can this structure change our everyday object in different ways: Function, interaction, production, economic, and Eco.

    Course of Study
    ECAL Product Design

    Tutors
    Anniina Koivu, Brynjar Sigurðarson

  • Helping build community among homeless recovering addicts

    Sych, Saul

    HSLU D&K

    2019

    HSLU D&K, 2019

    Abstract
    Many people that live on the streets fall into the clutches of addiction as a way to escape the pains of their current reality. The friends that they currently have may also be living with addiction so when they wish to become sober, they lose their sense of community and have no one to do healthy activities with. This thesis hopes to look into how build community among these recovering individuals and explore possibilities in working with nature, acts of giving to others, and other healthy activities to do with others.

    Course of Study
    HSLU Master Design

    Tutors
    -

  • Calligraphic form and function in the 21st century

    Varela, João

    ECAL

    2019

    ECAL, 2019

    Abstract
    Calligraphy is changing its form in the twenty-first century, it’s an urging matter to understand where it’s headed. To accomplish such prospects, it’s essential to understand its history and where it is coming from, bearing a fresh contemporary point of view. Since the beginnings of writing, calligraphy has emerged both as function and form. It has been an essential tool for mankind, to record history, science and even live the day-by-day. The act of handwriting has accompanied mankind since the beginning of history. As an action, calligraphy has its craft, and therefore its art. In western civilizations, calligraphy, and handwriting have mostly presented themselves as function. A way to keep knowledge or register important events. These letterforms had the ultimate function of presenting the content in the most transparent and impartial way possible. I believe that the appearance of typing systems, such as writing machines and keyboards, has set in motion a change of perspective. The introduction of technology produces a shift in the goal of writing by hand. It is no longer the most useful or effective manner to write, so it develops in the opposite direction. Calligraphy emerges as an art form, an expressive practice. Modern calligraphy differentiates itself by leaving the crystal goblet metaphor and embracing an artistic point of view. Letterforms can be containers of content by their meaning but also their form. A few questions arise: What makes calligraphy a relevant study in a time where most words are typed on keyboards? What is the calligraphic reaction to vector? Why is handwriting disappearing from the school curriculums? What are its uses in the 21st century? Where does digital calligraphy stand? I propose to tackle these questions in two parts. Theoretically: Where I plan to investigate calligraphy and handwriting history. Exploring its different forms, from ancient cuneiform alphabets to urban tagging and getting a deep understanding of the relation between human and writing. I plan to dive in the theory from the old masters, but also interviewing a new generation of calligraphers to get a fresh perspective on the practice. Empirically: What better way to understand a practical matter than to actually do it myself? I intend to start a regular practice that will help me understand the core of calligraphy and handwriting. This exercise will be recorded by its actual products and by a series of logs that will help keep track of questions and issues that might come along, whether theoretical or technical.

    Course of Study
    ECAL Art Direction

    Tutors
    Roland Früh, Wayne Daly, Matthieu Cortat

  • shot on auto mode

    Leites, Tammara

    HEAD

    2019

    HEAD, 2019

    Abstract
    In June 2019, Apple announced improvements to its Photos application. Machine learning algorithms would now go through the whole archive and choose the “best shots” taken by the user. Criteria for analysis would be based on a combination of image aesthetics and content meaning, intelligent processing would alter the selection based on the current date and its relationship to past events. Photography is an art that has always been associated with technology, the use of a machine is needed to capture loyal reproductions of the world around us. The democratisation of photography, by George Eastman, gave people access to keeping a personal, vernacular archive of their lives. What started as a luxury for a limited audience quickly evolved into an everyday practice for certain societies. Today, smarter machines are used to capture and record our lives either with or without a human operator (smartphones, surveillance cameras, body scanners, space satellites). At the time of writing, a simple hashtag search on Instagram shows only two images identified as #shotonautomode. Yet, technologies of automation have accompanied photography since its very beginning. Today, both the majority of point and shoot compact cameras and smartphone cameras have fully automatic modes, while manual controls are not always present. Indeed, auto mode is true for most images that are shared on the photo-sharing social platform as well as on similar ones. Shot on auto mode aims to analyse how our evolving relationship with digital technologies of automation has shaped vernacular photography. What is the role of “intelligence-powered devices” in the process of contemporary vernacular photography? In the form of an exhibition catalogue, this master thesis presents a succinct history of the relationship between automation and amateur photography, as well as a selection of artistic projects which illustrate or question both new and pre-established notions in photography and its “technical” evolution. Family photo albums have traditionally collected personal highlights, acting themselves as exhibition catalogues of our lives. Through the curator’s eye, our memories have been classified, organised, prepared for exhibition, then stored. Thus the choice of the exhibition catalogue as the format for this work.

    Course of Study
    HEAD Master Media Design

    Tutors
    Nicolas Nova

  • Plastic material design

    Choosakul, Wasan

    ECAL

    2019

    ECAL, 2019

    Abstract
    I have studied Ecal with the aim to absorb the design approach to develop my own business company in Thailand, a plastic injection factory. Plastic is a unique and wonderful material that humans have ever created in the world. It is a substituted substance that could be formed into any various shapes for different applications. It has implicitly become a crucial part of our living life and has never been any better materials than itself. Plastic was created from the inspiration to provide a substitute material for ivory by treating cellulose, derived from cotton fiber, with camphor in 1869 and it was developed into widely used in industrial manufacturing from petroleum extraction. Ever since we have a convenient pen to write down our thoughts in a notebook, a mouse to control and enables its user to move a cursor smoothly for a laptop, a construction helmet that protects labors from fallen objects by shock absorption, an elastic rubber that can prevent users from heat objects. World war II necessitated a great expansion of the plastics industry, as industrial might proved as important to victory as military success. Nylon was used during the war for parachutes, ropes, body armor and more. Plexiglas provided an alternative to glass for aircraft windows. Nevertheless, overusing of plastic from the past and nowadays, several non-degradable plastic production that is imbalance with numbers of recycling plastic factory in the world, causes a huge global crisis, plastic waste pollution, that we cannot solve it in the blink of an eye. With a high number of single-use plastic production, the difficulty of classifying plastic types and a bunch of contaminated plastic waste that is dumped in landfills or flown away in the ocean. I would like to create a thesis project based on the global crisis of plastic waste. It could be the way how to use the material in a smart and safe way or finding new substitute materials to use instead in the future.

    Course of Study
    ECAL Product Design

    Tutors
    Anniina Koivu

  • Including locals into tourism development

    Aerni, Jan

    HSLU D&K

    2019

    HSLU D&K, 2019

    Abstract
    - different types of tourism and their interactions with locals - communication, collaboration within a city/region/country - relationship locals and / vs. tourists - the local / authentic tourist experience

    Course of Study
    HKB MA Design

    Tutors
    _

  • A Project About Self Acceptance

    Eberhard, Markus

    HSLU D&K

    2019

    HSLU D&K, 2019

    Abstract
    The project is about self acceptance, helping others, being fair to yourself, etc. It will bei done in an illustrativ way. Maybe animation.

    Course of Study
    HSLU Master Design

    Tutors
    Jan Eckert

  • The importance of relaxation

    von Rickenbach, Sarah

    HSLU D&K

    2019

    HSLU D&K, 2019

    Abstract
    _

    Course of Study
    HSLU Master Design

    Tutors


  • Creation of Social Value through Design

    Vaulta, India

    HSLU D&K

    2019

    HSLU D&K, 2019

    Abstract
    tbd

    Course of Study
    HKB MA Design

    Tutors
    tbd

  • One small step for type design, one giant leap for mankind

    Bächtold, Maël

    ECAL

    2019

    ECAL, 2019

    Abstract
    In a world where everything become more and more digital and dynamic, what is the future of designing typefaces in this digital era? Today, variable fonts are becoming the new ground breaking invention in the domain and hasn’t reached its peak yet. How can we use variable fonts in different ways than regular fonts? What is going to happen when After Effect will support those files? Will it become the new standard format for font files? Let’s try to enlighten those questions through this document. Before going further, I would like to develop where this interest in this topic began. Since my interest in type design started around 2016, variable fonts got my attention really early in my practice. I always saw type design as a playful and experimental playground. I see in letters a really expressive tool and a medium that can be used in a lot of other design domains. In my design practice and during my bachelor I have also been interested in motion design and 3D animations. So it is not a surprise to me that some of my previous projects concern was about mixing type design with motion and 3D. And of course some of those projects were about variable fonts. Since then, this technology has been a real fascination to me. It is still being explored by other designers and hasn’t reached its full potential yet. I truly believe that it represent a huge revolution not only in the type design game but also to every type related fields. So I don’t only see this writing project as a theory research and informations gathering. I see it as a first step in my practice with variable fonts which really get me excited. It will help me understand and experiment with complex usages like the HOI (Higher Order Interpolation). It is developed by the type foundry Underware allowing to have a completely different control on interpolations. This part will be explained in details later. This thesis is also the opportunity for me to meet other designers and speak or share some expertise about this passion like I did with Ian Party from New Glyph. With whom I had some really interesting discussions not only about my topic but also about type design in general. This helped me in my work in many ways. In brief, this thesis is all about variable fonts in digital contexts, retracing the history and development of this technology, questioning its current and future uses, and also gathering different points of view from actual professionals from the field. I asked as many designers/type foundries their opinions about this topic. I think it is really important to have a different point of view on it but also to exchange with them some knowledge or skills about the format. Since all of this is really recent and of course not fully documented, I am writing those line at the same pace as my dive into the possibilities this technology has to offer. Because some new techniques, software versions or lectures given by designers comes out almost every day. Of course at some point this project will have to be accomplished and published. So maybe new elements will comes out and will not be featured. But I will explore as deep as possible the field in its state until when I will have to submit this memoire.

    Course of Study
    ECAL Art Direction

    Tutors
    Roland Früh, Wayne Dally

  • Type design as a product

    Schwarz, Arthur

    ECAL

    2019

    ECAL, 2019

    Abstract
    Memoire - Abstract - Type Design as a product Welcome to this solo-reading of my memoire’s abstract, Type Design as a product! It won’t be too long, so stay until the end and get some free satisfaction for having read something today! Isn’t that great? Yes! You get something for free for basically having done nothing! What a deal! Part 1 - The title Alright, enough with the sale’s speech, let’s talk more seriously about the topic. And what a topic! That title could be the title of so many different memoires. This is why you need to read the next short part where this title will be explained as simply as possible! Because one does know, people haven’t this much time nowadays. And, here we go! So, Type Design as a product. For some reasons, this might sound strange, right? Right! Is it because most of the people don’t know what Type Design is? Is it because higher-minded people don’t know that a typeface can be sold? Is it because when buying a typeface you don’t get anything physical? To all these questions, I would humbly answer with a simple “yes”! First, I think that it is a sure thing to claim that the average person doesn’t know about this Type Design thing. They simply don’t know because it is a tiny part in the amazing world of design. When someone buys a brand new PC to write emails on Microsoft Word, they get all those great typefaces for free! No need to buy any licence because it’s already there! For Free! You’ll get the great Georgia by Matthew Carter, a few cuts of Futura by Paul Renner and obvously the beautiful timeless Helvetica by Max Miedinger. For your more creative tasks, you’ll also be able to use the funny Comic Sans by Vincent Connare and the unbelievable Papyrus by Chris Costello! So when grandma’ wants to write an email to her grandson to thank him for calling her so many times every week, she just picks one! She has a wide range of typefaces to pick from! Isn’t it great? Yes! Alright, I am starting to depart from this first short explanation but the point is, people gets typefaces for free, without asking for it, without speding any money, without knowing that a human-being has drawn them. On the basis that most of the people don’t know about Type Design, how can we expect they know, a typeface is to be purchased? Well, I guess we can’t and we shouldn’t. No one to blame here because the target of a type foundry/type designer isn’t your grandma’ but usually small and large companies and designers. Second point is that typefaces are products. Since designers sell them, they need to be bought. And when you buy something, well, you get the thing. Do you understand what I mean? Of course not! This is simply because it’s unclear and you need to read the next short part. No worries, it will be fun! Usually, when you purchase a product, you obtain a physical good. This is a very common thing that happens to a lot of people. This other possibility is that you purchased a service which is different but still kind of the same. You pay for a massage, you feel relaxed. You pay for a DJ class, you get DJ skills. You pay for a train ticket, you get somewhere else. No actual physical goods because you had a non-physical service. The point is that normally when you buy something you get something. With Type Design, it is quite different since first, you don’t purchase a typeface but a licence; the right to use a typeface (but that’s an other story). Second point is, you don’t get any physical object with your typeface. You pay between $300 and $2000 for a typeface family and you “just” get a file on your computer. Even if it is totally worth your money, it may feel a bit frustrating. This is where it gets very interesting because nowadays there is a new kind of type foundries (I write a new kind since not all the type foundries are included) which sells goods. And they are legion. And they sell all sort of thing of any kind: basketballs, tee-shirts, hats, toy-bus etc. Type foundries tend to diversify more and more. Part 2 - Ask the pro That was for the explanation of the title. Now, let’s move to the next part of this memoire. We now all know that typefaces are products that need to be purchased. And who is selling typefaces? Mostly type foundries (mostly because some designers sell typefaces by their own means, through their website, for example)! This is why it highly matters to understand how a type foundry works, why a type foundry sell typefaces and what to do to sell them. And what is better than asking those questions directly to the people working in type foundries themselves? Reading their answers! In part two of this memoire are to be read interviews of several type foundries. It goes from large type foundries such as Dalton Maag (45 employees) to smaller ones like Luzi Type (1 employee). Also, you will be able to read an introduction about the type foundry interviewed plus a conclusion. Part 3 - Conclusion

    Course of Study
    ECAL Art Direction

    Tutors
    Wayne Daly

  • Responsible Production & Consumption

    Hügli, Joel

    HSLU D&K

    2019

    HSLU D&K, 2019

    Abstract
    Shift to a responsible production and consumption in Switzerland for a more balanced "Three-Dimensional Model" in terms of a sustainable development.

    Course of Study
    HSLU Master Design

    Tutors
    _

  • Inspiration – Assoziation & der subjektive Erfahrungshorizont

    Meister, Joanna

    ZHdK

    2019

    ZHdK, 2019

    MA J Meister 1
    MA J Meister 2

    Abstract
    Wo finde ich Inspiration in einer globalisierten Welt? Wie beeinflusst mein subjektiver Erfahrungshorizont mein kreatives Schaffen? Anhand von Textil Musterbüchern aus Lyon vom 19./20. Jh. zeige ich auf, wie Kreativität funktionieren kann und wie wie man von einer Inspirationsquelle ausgehend auf völlig anderer, neue Ideen kommen kann, die nichts mehr mit der Quelle zu tun haben.

    Course of Study
    ZHdK Visual Communication

    Tutors
    Alex Hanimann, Jonas Vögeli

  • _

    Albrecht, Florian

    HSLU D&K

    2019

    HSLU D&K, 2019

    Abstract
    _

    Course of Study
    HSLU Master Design

    Tutors
    _

  • _

    Wagner, Nora Dominique

    HSLU D&K

    2019

    HSLU D&K, 2019

    Abstract
    _

    Course of Study
    HSLU Master Design

    Tutors
    _

  • _

    Merlo, Anna

    HSLU D&K

    2019

    HSLU D&K, 2019

    Abstract
    _

    Course of Study
    HSLU Master Design

    Tutors
    _

  • _

    Zumbühl, Urs

    HSLU D&K

    2019

    HSLU D&K, 2019

    Abstract
    _

    Course of Study
    HSLU Master Design

    Tutors
    _

  • Immigration Experiences & Mental Health Care in Hispanic People

    Gutierrez Arauz, Karla

    HEAD

    2019

    HEAD, 2019

    Abstract
    Today, more people than ever live in a different country than the one they were born in. There are several reasons why people migrate to a new country: war conflicts, job or economic opportunities, security, political problems, etc. The number of people migrating all over the world is increasing, and with it, there are many problems to solve. Let’s talk about mental health. Immigration experiences, anti-immigrant sentiment and the impact of living in an unfamiliar country could affect the mental health of many of these people. In most developing countries, many people view mental health problems with a stigma; the importance of providing information easily is beneficial to their well-being. How to provide a tool for these people to feel more welcome in new countries? How to provide information? And how to connect these people to meet new communities that had gone through the same experiences? How to create and design an application/web site that functions as a tool to help people with a migrant background who have developed mental health problems due to displacement from their countries?

    Course of Study
    HKB MA Design

    Tutors
    Caroline Gurtner - Zsofia Glatz

    File
    MAD-Project-Abstract-KarlaGutierrezA.pdf

  • Window as privacy

    Katayama, Ryo

    ECAL

    2019

    ECAL, 2019

    Abstract
    Todays, at apartments they use window but they usually use race or translucent curtain to keep privacy. However, today there is a less meaning to use large transparent window at home in big cities. In the past, they did not have an air ventilation system and lighting product. Therefore, when the glass was invested, it was innovative material, it is a transparent wall. They can get sunlight and when they open they can get air from out. However, now we have a well functional air ventilation system and lighting source at home. Of course, from inside, people can enjoy the view but for instance, at apartments which placed in big cities, they can only see buildings, it is monotone. People who live in apartments they generally close race to keep privacy. So who lives in the apartment, they more care about privacy rather than air ventilation or sunlight. There is less reason to use a large transparent window in cities.

    Course of Study
    ECAL Product Design

    Tutors
    Anniina Koivu

  • Verkehr in der Zukunft

    Marti, Josias

    HSLU D&K

    2019

    HSLU D&K, 2019

    Abstract
    Der Verkehr ist die Basis für unser modernes Leben. Unsere Lebensweise ist auf Bewegung ausgerichtet. Wir pendeln mit der Bahn zur Arbeit, fahren mit dem Auto zum Skilaufen und gehen per Fahrrad an den nahen Fluss zum Picknick. Spannenderweise hat sich in letzter Zeit keine bahnbrechende Erfindung in unserem System etabliert. Es gibt Visionäre, die uns per Vakuum-Röhre mit Überschall in andere Städte katapultieren möchten. Der Wunsch eines autonomen Systems, dass unsereins in einem persönlichen Taxi nach der Fest-Sause nach Hause chauffiert, ist existent und trotzdem noch nicht greifbar. Die Thematik vom Verkehrsmittel, das einerseits Status-Symbol und andererseits Mittel für den Transport von A nach B ist, scheint in eine neue Ära zu driften. Carsharing wird laut Futurologen neue Verkehrskonzepte ermöglichen, die die Fahrt als Service besser adressieren als eine teure Anschaffung eines eigenen Fahrzeuges.

    Course of Study
    HKB MA Design

    Tutors
    Eckert Jan HSLU;

  • The aging of materials and products in design

    Bichsel, Benjamin

    ECAL

    2019

    ECAL, 2019

    Abstract
    The aging of products and materials does not have the importance it should have in product design today. We live in a world of fast consumption. This is not only true to fashion, where "fast fashion" has become a household name, but also for many everyday products that surround us. The design theorist Victor Papanek argued almost 25 years ago that the graceful aging of everyday objects must become an important design theme in the 21st century. But if we have a look at the ever faster product life cycles, we see that we are moving in the opposite direction. This seems all the more worrying as we become more and more aware of the limited availability of resources and the environmental impact of increasing production. A more thoughtful approach to the issue of the aging of materials and objects can be seen in architecture. An approach that could possibly serve as a guide for product design. The memoire should deal with the topic of the aging of products and materials in design and the question of how experts see the topic. Interviews with specialists in this field should show different perspectives on this issue.

    Course of Study
    ECAL Product Design

    Tutors
    Anniina Koivu, Brynjar Sigurdarson

  • Improvement of phobia treatment with VR

    Francke, Stephanie

    HSLU D&K

    2019

    HSLU D&K, 2019

    Abstract
    In the treatment of phobias, confrontational therapy is still regarded as one of the most successful approaches. Those who continuously expose themselves to their fear will, over time, reduce this phobia until it no longer exists. Studies have shown that experiences with virtual reality glasses control the brain in a similar way as if the user had observed what he saw in real life. From the combination of these findings, there are now successful phobia treatments with VR glasses that confront users with images of their fears. This treatment is currently still in development and is offered exclusively in special laboratories. On this basis I would like to design the structure and the execution of a commercial treatment. On the one hand the content of the VR therapy would have to be defined as well as a procedure for the distribution of this service to the customers.

    Course of Study
    HSLU Master Design

    Tutors
    Jan Eckert

  • The community of the Steglitzer Werkstatt as an example of early modernist tendencies

    Bente, Sascha

    ECAL

    2019

    ECAL, 2019

    DSCF2362
    DSCF2373
    DSCF2384
    DSCF2429
    DSCF2520
    DSCF2534

    Abstract
    My Thesis will treat the work and influence of, and the social construct around the Steglitzer Werkstatt, a small graphic design studio, which was founded in 1900 by Fritz Helmut Ehmcke, Georg Belwe and Friedrich Wilhelm Kleukens in Steglitz, a suburb of Berlin. Their business can be seen as the first collaborative graphic design practice in Germany working for commercial clients as well as keeping up the tradition of fine book making by self initiated projects and free collaborations with other artists. The Workshop was an important milestone in the German Buchkunst Movement and it’s aesthetics, furthermore a blueprint of the attitude adapted by the German Werkbund founded years later. During the turn of the century, a new social construct came up upon artists and fellow creatives. They worked and lived together, collaborated with each other and founded new models of living called Künstlerkolonien (artist colonies). A holistic approach of art was the aim. On the other hand there were less artistically motivated collaborations, the Werkstätten (workshops) which can be seen as the business side of this social phenomenon. My Thesis will examine the influence of this movement towards German graphic design and later even build a bridge to the Swiss style. In addition to this I will also have a look at the role of the women in at that time. Since the documentation about the (so called) male key figures is quite rich, it is interesting to see, which role women played (or were able to play) during this period. As an example I will treat the work of Clara Möller Coburg, a student of the Steglitzer Werkstatt’s educational program and later wife of F.H. Ehmcke and her influence in terms of visual style, attitude, language and also humour. As a start, my plan is to visit several archives in Germany to have a better and first hand impression of what the Steglitzer Werkstatt produced and how they did it. I hope to find unpublished material, sketches and drawings which show even better than a final piece of work, how the workshop was declining the Jugenstil and took pioneering steps towards a new rationalism.

    Course of Study
    ECAL Art Direction

    Tutors
    Wayne Daly, Roland Früh

  • Feminist Homework. Multi-case Study Research of Feminist Practices in Design Education.

    Ober, Maya

    HKB

    2019

    HKB, 2019

    DSC06197
    DSC06198
    DSC06199
    DSC06200
    DSC06217
    DSC06226
    DSC06228
    DSC06230

    Abstract
    “Feminist Homework” is multi-case study research of three contemporary courses that apply feminist perspectives within design education, interwoven with the local societal, historical and design context. The chosen practices are: Chair of Design and Gender Studies at the Faculty of Architecture, Design and Urbanism, University of Buenos Aires, Argentina; Norm-creative MA Programme in Visual Communication at Konstfack (University of Arts, Crafts and Design), Stockholm, Sweden; “Recreating a women’s school” Summer Course at MFA in Communications Design at Pratt Institute in NYC, USA. The project will culminate in the first draft of a bilingual publication (English-Spanish) aiming at exploring how feminist perspectives inform design education and what characterises feminist pedagogies of design. Parallel, an open, online directory will be launched, aiming at mapping (through an open call) and compiling of contemporary and past design teaching projects (both institutionalised and informal) that use and used feminist perspective. This platform will enable to map, visualise and connect between different educators, designers, scholars and will serve as a resource.

    Course of Study
    HKB MA Design

    Tutors
    Griselda Flesler

  • SichtWandel

    Adler, Lorena

    HSLU D&K

    2019

    HSLU D&K, 2019

    Abstract
    Concept of a collecting system for single-use clothings in hospitals after using and recycling the material of those oneway products. The idea is to create out of this material new products.

    Course of Study
    HSLU Master Design

    Tutors
    Jan Eckert

  • Preservation of Cultural heritage and traditions through digitalisation and data sharing using AI

    Chobanova, Kristina

    HKB

    2019

    HKB, 2019

    Abstract
    Many cultural heritage collections are nowadays going through a phase of mass-digitisation, whereby the objects are digitised, catalogued and published at an unprecedented scale using computational means. However, in Bulgaria this is still a very problematic topic. The proposed project is about creating a system for digitalisation of data and how to spread it to a wide range of public with educational and cultural enrichment purposes. The very first concept for it is to have real time scenery depicting interactive Application which generates information about the geological location using database archives.

    Course of Study
    HKB MA Design

    Tutors
    Ulrike Felsing

  • Collecting, Combining, Translating

    Gildein, Janis

    ECAL

    2019

    ECAL, 2019

    Abstract
    Collecting, Combining, Translating—Working with existing material, remodeling as a contemporary design method. Might the approach of sampling or combining disparate elements be our contemporary technique of creativity and cultural production? Or does it fail to be autonomous? Schaffen, gestalten, entwerfen, schöpfen–the german language uses various words to describe “to design”. It is having one in common: describing a movement or an action. Also the word “erfinden”, meaning “inventing”, is based on the action of finding. It doesn’t describe design as a mindful innovation, but as an action that is based on existing material. In the process of type-making, we are relying on many methods to generate new form. They can include combining, referring, translating. The field of design usually thrives for innovation. Starting something original from scratch? But as a student in type design I also notice creating letterforms is a very slow design discipline. In a digital area we are relying on form models which are 200 years old or older. In a digital era designing type means translating shapes to the computer. It also means having access to endless sources and it also means handling this material. The memoire aims to have a look at these methods, compare them to my own mode of designing and seeing if in these different techniques lies a fundamental or possible chance for creating something “new”.

    Course of Study
    ECAL Art Direction

    Tutors
    Roland Früh, Wayne Daly

  • La brique

    Mion, Timothée

    ECAL

    2019

    ECAL, 2019

    IMG 3637

    Abstract
    Typology of a vernacular object. So simple and yet so versatile, the brick is the most ancient man-made building material. It has been used throughout the world for over 9000 years. How did it evolve? Why is it still relevant? And where is it going? Last summer I’ve visited a brick manufacturer, near Payerne in Switzerland. It was a really insightful discovery that I want to investigate further. I was also surprised to realize that there are not many existing books about ‘bricks’. That’s the reason why with this memoire I want to collect information to create a clear and intuitive analyze of this typology. To do so I will organize a series of interviews with manufacturers, designers, architects and key people related to this object. To document its manufacturing process, properties, varieties, evolution, and other discoveries.

    Course of Study
    ECAL Product Design

    Tutors
    Annina Koivu

  • Resource Water

    Müller, Hilla

    HSLU D&K

    2019

    HSLU D&K, 2019

    Abstract
    Durch die Erfahrungen in meinem Auslandssemester im Jahre 2017 in Kapstadt, Südafrika, würde ich gerne die Problematik des Wassermangels durch den Klimawandel sowie den sorglosen Umgang der Menschen mit dem lebenswichtigen Element in meinem Masterprojekt behandeln. In der dort verbrachten Zeit kam ich oftmals in meinem Alltag mit dem Wassermangel in Berührung, zum Beispiel durch das Duschen in einer Bütte, bei der das hinterlassene Wasser in die Toilettenspülung eingespeist wurde. Aus diesen Erfahrungen ergeben sich für mich spannende Ansätzte für eine illustrative Umsetzung, die mit Textinhalten unterstützt werden sollen. So könnte ein Magazin zur Aufklärung und Information über die dort herrschenden Umstände entstehen. An der Zusammenarbeit mit einer sich für die Umwelt einsetzenden Organisation wie WWF Schweiz und der damit verbundenen Realisierbarkeit des Projekts wäre ich zudem sehr interessiert. Mein Design soll in seiner Wirkung den Nutzer über die Ressource Wasser im alltäglichen Leben aufklären, ihn zum Nachdenken über sein Verhalten/ seinen Verbrauch bringen und ihn somit zu einer positiven Veränderung im Umgang mit Wasser motivieren. Der Kontext in welchem das Designprodukt agieren soll wäre im alltäglichen Leben von Menschen in Mitteleuropa.

    Course of Study
    HSLU Master Design

    Tutors
    Jan Eckert

  • Supermarket

    Wu, Yu-Ying

    ECAL

    2019

    ECAL, 2019

    Abstract
    The browsing, selection and purchase of commodities is one of the defining activities of modern urban life. Shopping has overtaken the mere satisfaction of physical necessities, becoming a ritual in which identities are shaped and transformed. Supermarket, which means any grocery store with at least $2 million or more annual sales that features self-service and a full line of groceries, non-foods, and perish departments, including produce, meat and dairy. Many objects have been invented and dedicating to the shops since the early 20s, such as elevator, refrigerator, and food-packaging machines. Food product lines have been extended and reached also the needs of the minority. In order to seduce customers, the designers of supermarkets have to appeal senses from sight, sound , touch, taste, and smell. The marketing industry has grown immensely for making customers do impulse purchases. Let’s not leave the crucial “shopping psychology” which have been studied for years as a foundation behind. Supermarket, which can be seen as a theatre for all the commodities of life essentials. Customers are like the audience. I have long been fascinated by the methods used to “play”, impress, amuse, excite, educate, stimulate and satisfy the customers in a supermarket.

    Course of Study
    HKB MA Design

    Tutors
    Anniina Koivu, Brynjar Sigurðarson

  • ADOPTING OBJECT(IVE)S - Learn from squats

    Thomet, Stefan

    ZHdK

    2019

    ZHdK, 2019

    Abstract
    Das Wohnzimmer ist in unserem westlichen kulturellen Umfeld ein Raum mit hoher Prägnanz. Es gibt Auskunft über die Identität und den sozialen Status der Nutzenden. Die Übermittlung von Bedeutungen scheint die zentrale Funktion dieser Sachkomposition zu sein und durch die vermehrt standardisierten und austauschbaren Produkte verliert das Wohnzimmer als Komposition von Objekten an Funktion. Stuhl? Sitzen! Sofa? Liegen, Fernsehen. Wir kaufen uns Objekte, um eine bestimmte Funktion damit zu erfüllen. Das Wohnzimmer wird dadurch statisch und verliert dadurch an Potential ein dynamischer Ort zu sein, welcher sich auf die aktuellen Bedürfnisse des Nutzenden abstimmt. In den untersuchten Besetzten Häusern wird aus den vorhandenen Objekten die zu erfüllende Funktion erfüllt, es entsteht ein dynamischer, sich anpassender Lebensraum. Diese Arbeit nutzt Besetzte Häuser als Perspektivenwechsel, um die Funktionen von Objekten im Wohnzimmer kritisch zu hinterfragen und neue Prinzipien für die Gestaltung von Objekten im Wohnzimmer zu schaffen.

    Course of Study
    ZHdK Product Design

    Tutors
    Aela Vogel, Annina Gähwiler, Martin Meier

  • Bestiaire Vidéoludique : Les animaux dans les jeux vidéo

    Ferreira Barreiras, Catia

    HEAD

    2019

    HEAD, 2019

    Abstract
    Dans ce travail de mémoire, j’ai décidé de m’intéresser à la place qu’occupent les animaux dans les jeux vidéo, que ce soit durant leur essor dans les années 1980 ou aujourd’hui. Je commencerai ce travail par une réflexion de nature typologique, en proposant de catégoriser les animaux figurants dans les jeux vidéo selon des éléments récurrents dans l’univers vidéoludique. En m’appuyant sur un article de Krzysztof Janski, il s’agira d’étoffer chacune de ces catégories avec exemples à l’appui. Cette ébauche typologique provisoire servira de base pour la constitution d’un bestiaire et la rédaction d’une série d’études de cas. Le but de ce tour d’horizon est de cartographier les animaux présents dans les jeux vidéo et de définir les motifs ou les récurrences qui se dégagent de leurs diverses représentations.

    Course of Study
    HEAD Master Media Design

    Tutors
    Daniel Pinkas

  • Episodic Storytelling in Video Games

    Koeberle, Johannes

    ZHdK

    2019

    ZHdK, 2019

    Abstract
    The narrative genre of episodic storytelling has been popularized in the past decade due to the rise of streaming services. Nowadays video games are heavily influenced by this trend and new ways of telling stories emerge. My project takes a look at these changes and the possibilities but also difficulties they bring for game developers and writers.

    Course of Study
    ZHdK Game Design

    Tutors
    Beat Suter

  • delicious experiment to eat with(out) leftover food - Leftover food design

    Seo, Hyeon Jin

    ZHdK

    2019

    ZHdK, 2019

    Dried radish
    Compost
    Dried veges
    For the stock
    Fridge
    Leftovers
    Performance
    Soap nut

    Abstract
    We eat, digest, and excrete food. We feel, experience, and enjoy food. And we throw away these foods. When did we start throwing away food? And why did we start throwing away food? If we are full and can't eat anymore, food is injured, or we don't want to eat, we throw it away. If the food you left is dumped in the trash, it is food waste. But if you food is back on your table, can you still call it food waste? Design that provides multiple experiences with leftover food. This design can create a new perspective on what we have. Through this project, we want to recognize our current food waste problems and to provide information about how our eating habits affect the environment.

    Course of Study
    ZHdK Visual Communication

    Tutors
    Alex Hanimann

  • Photobooks

    Furrer, Anja Karolina

    ECAL

    2019

    ECAL, 2019

    Abstract
    This research in Master Photography will be on photobooks, more specifically on their materiality, content and their relationship with the viewer. A book is a sustainable object and medium for photography. As photography keeps changing over the years, the book stays the same. Books can’t be replaced by any digital device. Books are made of paper, they have a body and weight. Those who want to talk about books must experience them. It’s all about the physicality, about the smell of paper, the materiality, color and textures. And about the emotional relationship to books as personal and sensual objects. The book is not dead – it still has very unique qualities. It has multiple dimensions, it’s a space. Furthermore it is a democratic object. What importance does the book as object and space in a digitalized world have? How do contemporary artist use the photobook as tool to present their work? In the last decade artist books and bookfairs became more and more popular. As well as Publishing as an artistic practice. But what is so fascinating about books? Why are they still not to be left out when speaking about photography?

    Course of Study
    ECAL Art Direction

    Tutors
    Milo Keller

  • Photography as an object in a digital era or the desire to materialize a zero-dimensional code

    Deporta, Jasmine

    ECAL

    2019

    ECAL, 2019

    7cb8f26ae86e9f2c1fe03275d6ea6235

    Abstract
    The world has been deeply changed by the digital moment and screens and interfaces are reformulating our experience of it. A digital mindset is inextricably entangled with our existence. The screen has become a primary means of processing visual information and digital files are becoming our primary experience of visual culture. The internet produces a digital database that seems like a universal inventory of appearances. The majority of photographic images are being recorded digitally and this transformation has broadened access to photographic images — both in making and in viewing. The invention of digital technology marks the first revolutionary change for photographic practice since the invention of the negative/positive process. It ‘s digitalization changed and redefined our rapidly changing visual culture and what we consider to be a photograph. Since then digital experiences and the progressive saturation of everyday life through photography as medium make up so much of contemporary life. The digital context of images is infused by ‚a focus on image content ‘(Sassoon, 1998) and the concentration on the visual nature. Photographs get managed as a data bank of images, ‚understood to be uncomplicated, transparent and passive representations of truth ‘(Barthes 1993). This means not only that photography as a medium is going through a democratic, universalizing process, but it implements as well the dematerialization of images and the change of the physical state from the material to the pixel. ‚The complex, multifaceted nature of the photographic object‘ has been reduced to a ‚to a single unitary digital form‘ (Sassoon 1998) - a flat continuum of data. Images are visual surfaces, universal and homogeneous, reduced from the complexity of a photographic object to a zero dimension. The digital image is intangible Technology is getting more and more invisible and intangible. But a progressive and linear evolution always comes with a countercurrent or at least an expression of desire full romanticism. Even in the digital age, when the materiality of images fades into a numeric number of bits, the desire for the material object remains. Post digital photography brought up a growing desire to extract images from their digital obscurity and so in recent years photographers have reconsidered and experimented analog image taking and printing techniques. Classical methods, that reflect a certain nostalgy for photographic practice have been revived. Amidst this, some contemporary photographers started making work that addresses, either directly or implicitly, another potential of the medium’s metamorphosis. For these photographers, the digital moment evoked the notion of potentiality to create works that move between physical and digital processes and find their final form in sculptures and objects. In the post-digital era photographers rarely produced material objects as the final step in their process but artists like Anouk Kruithof, Rachel de Joode, and Katja Novitzkova started to translate photographs into tridimensional objects that exist in time and space. All of them work with sculpturality as a central part of their practice and create multilayered objects that are tangible. The physical nature in this works is of central importance and perhaps reflects a response to the saturation of screen-based imagery that surrounds us. They reflect on a reality that exists at the interchange of physicality and digitality, of materiality and information, bodies and technology. They are creating photographic works that encourage the conjunction of a body and the space around it and enhance the awareness of the physical self in a virtual world. So, it happens that, by contrast with the homogenous nature of the digital image the works highlight material features and photography reclaims volume, opacity, tactility and a physical presence in the world.

    Course of Study
    ECAL Art Direction

    Tutors
    Claus Gunti

  • A GAMIFIED LEARNING RECORD STORE AS A SOLUTION TO THE HUMAN RIGHT OF EDUCATION

    Turkawka, Gregory

    ZHdK

    2019

    ZHdK, 2019

    Diagram

    Abstract
    Although universal digital identification systems are explored by many and personal learning record stores as part of LTI or xAPI collectors do exist, the creation of a global digital identification systems is currently contested by Google, Microsoft and Facebook as most widely used 3rd-party authentication systems. Furthermore, open access to educational resources is despite the digitalization a dream for many. Aggregating formal and informal learning data and collecting them in a personal learning record store is a very sensitive issue and can't be trustworthy offered by companies or countries. This might be a reason there are currently no initiatives that succeed to implement a global system of digital identification nor a personal learning record store for everyone. Creating a biometric digital identity verification system to grant access to a personal learning record store where informal and formal learning achievements get aggregated by xAPI-protocol, is building the ground for further use. An artificially intelligent, tokenized, value-backed platform that analyzes personal achievements, badges and certificates and further learning opportunities according to culture and field of experience will offer additional educational resources, job opportunities or new fields of interest. The combination of institutional or open educational resources and informal learning opportunities with selectable educational achievement maps and a tokenized value system for further access to payed learning resources has not been realized yet. By creating a token system that is backed up with real funds as part of a personal learning record store, also the un-banked population can experience learning as value and gets invested in further educational resources. Achievement maps and a non-biased evaluation and matching-system will give orientation and offer individual, personalized learning paths for further exploration as well as new possibilities to proof or certify achievements and competences. By constantly adding new resources, learning results and achievements the data can be crunched and analyzed by artificial intelligent systems to offer clusters, trends and insights. The results in combination with an engaged community of learners can be used for further, also collaborative learning, the creation of new educational resources or for paid projects, job recruitment and job offerings. The semantic matching-system will help to find fits according to industry according to its cultural backgrounds. A blockchain as ledger will store all sensible data and build the trusted system for the users. The concept is highlighting the elements needed for an educational solution to UNESCO’s SDG 4 goals and is part of a Master thesis at Zurich University of Arts and Zurich University of Teacher Education. It should be shared and further developed in the sense of "Working Out Loud" together with interested individuals, organizations, developers, educators, NGOs and learners. The realization of the learning record store and its implementation in six testing countries is planned early 2021 in cooperation with UNICEF or other international organizations. More info also at: https://turkawka.link/zenodo-master

    Course of Study
    ZHdK Game Design

    Tutors
    René Bauer, Mela Kocher

    File
    Gamified-Solution-to-the-Right-of-Education-Paper.pdf

  • Sculpturality of Food in Contemporary Art

    Hullár, Johanna

    ECAL

    2019

    ECAL, 2019

    Beni Bischof Saussage Power
    Ausstellungsansicht Olaf Breuning NRW Forum Duesseldorf Foto B Babic 34
    Urs Fischer Faules Fundament 1998
    Laila Gohar Food and Form
    Chloe Wise PAP6193 Edit
    Chloe Wise 2016 11 17 Division Wise 115
    Lorenzo Vitturi Dalston Anatomy

    Abstract
    Johanna Hullár / ecal 2019/20 Wintersemester Sculpturality of Food in Contemporary Art Abstract Eating is the most essential need of human beings, both physically and culturally. Through food we follow traditions and identify ourself. What we eat /or not eat, becomes political, we can express ourselves. Through food we can investigate and address ecological, sociological and economic aspects and habits. Through food we connect. It´s a medium everybody understands. The tradition of representation of food in art history is very long. In the genre still life it gained a high metaphoric and symbolic state. I´m very much interested in this symbolic system. Time plays a huge part within. It is just a moment, which is captured in the still-life, and it implicates its vanity. Although the representation of food has a long tradition, using food as a material is highly reserved by 20th-century artists. With the rise of conceptual art in the ´60s and ´70s artists started to use banal and everyday objects as art, among kitchen utensils, cooking and food. We can think about early feminist performance artists, like Carolee Schneemann with her performance piece Meat Joy NYC (1964) or Martha Rosler’s Semiotics of the Kitchen (1975), whose addressing female roles and expectations in society. Another strategy to use food is humour and rebellion, as we see at the artworks by the swiss artist duo Fischli/Weiss. While Fischli/Weiss are working in their time with transgression, today´s artists don´t seem like to do so. It is not anymore a political rebellion. We have enough food, woman are not assigned anymore to the kitchen (although still a lot is to improve). I wonder why so many artists are turning to this medium nowadays, in times of #foodporn? Why became imagery of food so important while we are overloaded with personal and consumer visuals in every channel we use? In case of #food, it is one of the most popular hashtags. Or is it the phenomenon to pay attention to the everyday details? And what about the future? How is food going to look like? Is it going to emphasise experiences? Or do we need to give up our senses? In my research thesis, I´m going to investigate these questions and analyse artworks of contemporary artists which are using food today and why they are using it. Starting with the ´90s artworks, I´m rather interested in the sculptural and artistic approach than in applied food photography. An interesting starting point is the artist Urs Fischer who often uses food in his installations, for example, the Rotten Foundation (1998) or the Untitled (Bread House) (2004-2005). Also, I see the common humorous ground in works especially of swiss german contemporary artists who are using food such as Urs Fischer, Olaf Breuning, or Beni Bischof. Young female artists like the Canadian Chloe Wise or the in Kairo born food stylist Laila Gohar are using Instagram, as gallery space and tool of their creations. I´m fascinated by food in the way how it triggers all of our senses - taste, touch, smell - through a visual picture. It is a vehicle for stories of memories, nostalgia, fantasies, and desires. But it also implicates the impermanence of itself and nature. We know it´s going to be eaten and therefore it is a morbid reminder of our own decay.

    Course of Study
    HKB MA Design

    Tutors
    Claus Gunti

    File
    Sculpturality-of-Food-in-Contemporary-Art.pdf

  • (I am an exchange student)

    Kozaki, Genta

    ZHdK

    2019

    ZHdK, 2019

    Abstract
    (I am an exchange student)

    Course of Study
    ZHdK Visual Communication

    Tutors
    Sarah Owens, Björn Franke, Thomas Wolfram.

  • Burn After Reading

    He, Weichi

    ECAL

    2019

    ECAL, 2019

    BAR Bettler Antique 1
    BAR Bettler Antique 2
    BAR Doves 1
    BAR Doves 2
    BAR Doves 5
    BAR Excoffon Book 1
    BAR Excoffon Book 2
    BAR Unica 1
    BAR Unica 2
    BAR Unica 3

    Abstract
    Burn After Reading The after-life of typefaces In recent years, Type Design has become an increasingly popular and fast-developing field. The access to technology, knowledge, and visibility has resulted in a critical mass of new type designers, typefaces and foundries being launched at a pace that has never been seen before. This has made it difficult for designers and users to differentiate and/or appreciate typefaces as something more than just tools. As a way to subvert and set this obsession with production and publishing aside, we may consider some other interesting approaches or points of view. One of them is to look at unfinished/unrealized state, limited access to, disappearance or even destruction of a typeface as part of the project. There are several cases in which this status has embedded fonts with a special quality or meaning, setting them apart from others. Even though some consider typefaces merely as tools, this might be a reductive definition, as some of them are packed with valuable information and stories, stories that often reveal much more than the shapes we usually look at as both designers and readers. By documenting and examining different cases like Doves Type, Excoffon Book, Bettler Antique or Unica, and looking for similarities in other creative fields, Burn After Reading aims to shine a different light on some typefaces and their amusing stories where destruction or an “unrealized status” has played a key role in how these are perceived. These different cases (some real and some fictional) will take form as a book of short stories, in which the use of narrative and fictional components will be used to expand on issues beyond their letter shapes. Bibliography —Bernard B., 2018. L’ultime caractère de Roger Excoffon (The last character of Roger Excoffon) Retrieved from: https://www.brunobernard.com/lultime-caractere-de-roger-excoffon/ —Green R., 2015. Doves Type History. Retrieved from: https://typespec.co.uk/doves-type-history/ —Hoejlund M., 2019. The Emotional Life of Typefaces: An Interview with J-LTF. Retrieved from: https://walkerart.org/magazine/the-emotional-life-of-typefaces-an-interview-with-jungmyng-lee-from-jung-lee-type-foundry —Langdon J., 2014. A School for Design Fiction. —Lee J., 2017. Real-Time Realist. —Miller, M., 2019. From Claude Monet to Banksy, Why Do Artists Destroy Their Own Work?, Retrieved from: https://www.nytimes.com/2019/03/11/t-magazine/artists-destroy-past-work.html?utm_source=soldsie&utm_medium=referral&utm_campaign=190311_whydoartistsdestroytheirownwork%3F —Wilson, C., 2000. “I’m Only A Designer”: The Double Life Of Ernst Bettler. Dot Dot Dot, Issue 2.

    Course of Study
    ECAL Art Direction

    Tutors
    Roland Früh and Wayne Daly

  • Bijoux artificiels mais précieux.

    Chartres, Lou

    HEAD

    2019

    HEAD, 2019

    Abstract
    Ce mémoire a pour sujet le bijou de haute fantaisie. Cette typologie de bijouterie est abordée dans le but de questionner le statut d’un bijou n’intégrant pas la grille des valeurs propre à la bijouterie traditionnelle. Il est nécessaire de comprendre que le terme « haute » fantaisie permet de scinder le bijou de fantaisie en deux partie, mettant de côté pour cet écrit le bijou de pacotille. Le bijou de haute fantaisie est traité en trois grandes parties : partie historique énumérant les grandes lignes de la naissance du bijou fantaisie ; partie analyse de la valeur, mettant en place une comparaison du bijou traditionnel et du bijou de haute fantaisie, énonçant point par point les valeurs propres à ces deux typologies ; partie ambivalences, mettant l’accent sur l’existence d’un no man’s land théorique entre vrai (bijou traditionnel) et faux (bijou de haute fantaisie). Cet écrit a pour but de démontrer, que si la sagesse populaire distingue le vrai bijou (réalisé à partir de matériaux, métaux précieux et gemmes) du faux bijou (réalisé à partir de matériaux non précieux), il s’agit d’un amalgame : le bijou traditionnel n’étant pas l’antinomie du bijou de fantaisie. Le résultat de ce mémoire est de prouver que le bijou de fantaisie a une place à part entière dans la bijouterie, et que ce qualificatif péjoratif de faux bijou qui lui colle à la peau n’a pas qualité de vérité, puisque fantaisie et joaillerie se trouvent sur le même niveau de l’échelle de la bijouterie, chacune de ces typologies possédant sa propre légitimité. Le bijou de fantaisie est une forme de bijou avec ses valeurs propres et son contexte de validation propre.

    Course of Study
    HEAD Master of Arts in Fashion and Accessories Design

    Tutors
    Elizabeth Fischer

    File
    Lou_Chartres_Bijoux-artificiels-mais-précieux.pdf

  • AI in photography

    Klak, Philipp

    ECAL

    2019

    ECAL, 2019

    Abstract
    For this work, I want to elaborate on the current state of the art in the field of artificial intelligence and the way the technology influences not only still photography but also moving images. The aim will also be to see how these developments might shape the future of our visual culture of images in an overall speculative way. In my studies and also, in general, I’m interested to look behind systems and also to research how technology evolves. The aim in this thesis is to feature an associative and understandable illustrative way of explaining the systems without going too deep into the technical details as this would be too complex and requires a fundamental understanding of computer science and advanced mathematics. Artificial intelligence has had a massive hype in the last years which is due to faster computers, the use of specific hardware (GPUs/graphics processing units) and new ways of analysing and generating content like the usage of GANs (algorithms/algorithms). In order to give a substantial overview, I will feature an explanatory part in the beginning to differentiate all the buzzwords which are flying around in the media when it comes to a conversation about AI. In particular, I will also be talking about GANs (Generative Adversarial Networks), as they are one of the most relevant technologies when it comes to generating a general outcome, which at the same time, is detached from the cognitive way of understanding by the human. Following this theoretical first part of the work, I want to get more into the contemporary use cases and also the state of the art of the development. It will also be important to speak about issues that come with Generative Artificial Intelligence as it is a very biased technology which doesn’t only rely on random decisions. Despite the fact that these systems are working autonomously, they are very much determined as they originally were made by humans and also trained with specific datasets that follow rules and sometimes certain patterns and political interests. Photography and the media already are in a constant but slow shift for years. This tendency will speed up drastically in certain fields as the systems are getting smarter, gaining more and more information an knowledge - just like an infant growing older and learning to understand the world. The motivation for this work is the fact that it should be in the interest of any person in the creative field and also in general today to get to know and to gain competence to understand what is presently happening. We are in a similar situation when digital photography took over the analogue world and photoshop came into being. Already back then people feared consequences of not being able to believe anything anymore as anything could be manipulated. In this contemporary case of AI “taking over", it will be much more interesting and complex - in both a positive but also negative way. A speculative part finally concludes by giving an outlook into ethics and the future of what might come and also look at development predictions.

    Course of Study
    ECAL Art Direction

    Tutors
    Claus Gusti

  • The role of Swiss factories in the global type production for typewriters

    Wietlisbach, Sophie

    ECAL

    2019

    ECAL, 2019

    Abstract
    In the second mid of the 20th century, Swiss factories produced an estimated half of the world production of types for typewriters. Caractères S.A, SETAG and Nova-type specialized in the fabrication of metal type for typewriters and calculators. Based in Le Locle, Neuchâtel, Bassecourt and Delémont, key areas in watch production and high precision mechanics, these three factories exported the biggest part of their production worldwide supplying famous typewriters companies. Founded in the 40s, these factories flourished during the following thirty years, until the inkjet and laser printer appeared. This set the end of the typewriter era and the demand for their original products crashed. They turned towards plastic injections, treatment of surfaces and aerosols. This thesis investigates the role of these Swiss factories in the global production for typewriter and their likely contribution to type design and technical development.

    Course of Study
    ECAL Art Direction

    Tutors
    Roland Früh, Wayne Daly

  • The Self in Between Screens / The Self Through The External Gaze

    Tamosiunaite, Gedvile

    ECAL

    2019

    ECAL, 2019

    Abstract
    The sense of identity comes after separation of the self-image and outside world and it happens through gaze to a mirror. The external gaze plays important role in the sense of the self, the role of ‘the other’. Taking Jacques Lacan’s ‘Mirror Stage’ concept as basis of my thesis I aim to explore the importance of external gaze in building and understanding self identity in the context of the Internet and contemporary technologies containing screens - tactile surfaces communicating highly aesthetized information. To be able to grasp empiric side of the case I choose to departure from my personal emotional experience in relation to being looked at and looking. In the process of writing and research I am going to broaden my personal experience into wider perspective exploring such as phenomenon as spectatorship and the gaze / power and gender / cinema / the gaze and desire, as well as to account with reference to psychoanalytic theory. The screen essentially adds new dimension to the perception of identity and probably our behaviour looking at the screen - mirror. Writing this thesis I would like to explore the change of the self perception and importance of external gaze and how it was affected by technologies such as webcam, live streaming, mobile phones.

    Course of Study
    ECAL Art Direction

    Tutors
    Claus Gunti, Milo Keller

  • La beauté cachée de l’orteil, comment révéler son éclat ?

    Francony, Lucile

    HEAD

    2019

    HEAD, 2019

    Abstract
    La problématique de mon mémoire est la suivante : « La beauté cachée de l’orteil, comment révéler son éclat ? ». Je présente mon mémoire sous la forme d’une installation de boîtes. Chacune d’elle renferme une idée, une anecdote, un épisode de vie liés à mon expérience des doigts de pied ou à un événement en lien avec les orteils. Au gré de mes lectures littéraires, historiques, anthropologiques, artistiques sur l’orteil, la chaussure et le bijou, j’ai isolé plusieurs thèmes ou concepts qui sont mis en œuvre dans les cinq boîtes qui composent ce mémoire. Chacune recèle un aspect de l’orteil considéré dans ses forces et faiblesses, dans sa poésie et son indignité. Il est abordé sous l’angle de la féminité (en lien avec ma propre expérience en tant que femme), de l’intimité, de la miniature et de la préciosité. Pour chaque boîte j’ai choisi une expression liée au pied qui rappelle le concept du contenu. La boite liée à la féminité se nomme : « A ses pieds ». A l’intérieur, j’ai développé les idées : du genre au travers de la chaussure, du fétichisme et de l’évocation de l’orteil dans le design de chaussure dans la mode. Dans la boite de l’intimité : « Sur la pointe des pieds », j’aborde l’idée des « limites » du corps, j’évoque le rapprochement de l’orteil aux organes sexuels féminin et masculin notamment par le biais du conte de Cendrillon et je mentionne la transgression de l’espace intime. Dans la boite de la miniature, « En pieds », j’analyse de manière concise la fascination suscité par la miniaturisation puis la pratique de la réflexologie qui vise à représenter un corps entier dans l’espace d’un pied. Pour finir dans la boite de la préciosité, « Sur un piédestal », je fais un rapprochement entre orteil et bijou et j’évoque sa beauté cachée notamment au travers d’une œuvre de Naomi Filmer. La lecture de l’ouvrage de George Bataille, à l’écriture très libre, m’a encouragée à émailler ce mémoire de textes personnels qui soulignent la présence forte de l’orteil dans ma vie et mon imaginaire depuis l’enfance. Chaque boite, comme un tiroir, peut se « lire/vivre » de façon autonome à condition de passer par la boite originelle en premier qui fait office d’introduction. Cette recherche est liée à un ressenti très personnel, ainsi, je souhaitais que la lecture de ce mémoire soit vécue comme une expérience sensorielle. Je veux susciter chez le lecteur la même fascination et intérêt que provoquerai la découverte d’un cabinet de curiosité pour éveiller un intérêt pour ce membre « oublié » du corps humain. J’aimerai que cette observation le pousse à réfléchir à sa propre expérience de ses orteils, qu’il ouvre les yeux sur leur beauté et leur témoigne un peu de bienveillance. En somme, c’est un manifeste de l’orteil.

    Course of Study
    HEAD Master of Arts in Fashion and Accessories Design

    Tutors
    Elizabeth Fischer

    File
    Résumé-mémoire-Lucile-Francony.pdf

  • The human-less present of social media marketing through digital avatars

    Bervini, Robin

    ECAL

    2019

    ECAL, 2019

    Abstract
    We are living in a time where most attention to advertisement, brands and celebrity following of the average digital-native is focused on social media. At the moment of writing, in the case of western culture Instagram is the main platform where people express themselves – read their digital selves. Instagram profiles are the digital space where users represent a curated and retouched version of themselves and their life to the world, and their Instagram feed is where they keep up with news and topics of interest, where they follow their brands and see targeted advertising and where they see what’s going on in celebrities and influencers lives. With the fast-growing use of face filters and retouching apps, to share selfies has turned from an embarrassing and mostly private gesture into an accepted must, creating what can’t be longer seen as a trend but just as the new standard. Users are now curators of their online image, and selfies are parting from the traditional notion of a self-portrait. As explained by Nathan Jurgenson in “The Social Photo: On Photography and Social Media”: “Sometimes a selfie is different than a self-portrait, less an accurate picture of me at this time in this place and more […] a visual depiction of the idea of me.” The selfies are so curated and filtered that in my opinion, they are becoming our online avatars. It is still us that we are showing to the world, but not in an accurate and completely honest way. We not only enhance our look but by curating all the contents of our feeds and stories we are also tailoring a polished and glamourized (or in other cases, roughed down and rebellious) version of our everyday life, focusing on activities, places, foods, and object. And again, how we show these, often gives a misleading idea of our lifestyle and even our wealth. In the same book, Nathan Jurgenson points out how social photography can make our lives like a sort of game: with our avatar and constructed life we take part in it and the score is countable in likes, followers, shares, retweets and so on. Amid all this parting between essence and image, a new phenomenon is emerging. We have witnessed Amalia Ulman trick tens of thousands of people with her performative work in Excellences & Perfections, where she faked the life of an “it girl” on her Instagram, and by doing so she exposed how gullible we are to digital selves of others although we all know how easy it is to fake a glamorous life online. The phenomenon I mentioned goes a step beyond this performance. Several virtual influencers and model are appearing on social media. The first ones started as an experiment or art project, but these profiles made such an impact where they are now getting the same attention as successful influencers, they model for fashion brands and they even start their bands. CGI influencers and models are just the most recent instance related to virtual avatars, entirely constructed personas, and marketing stunts, so it’s worth going through previous cases to outline how we got here and what it means for identity Today. Although the CGI influencers might seem a very current topic, through art there are many examples of the creation of virtual personas even before CGI, and so it happened in the music industry. While not digitally constructed, the French DJ duo Daft Punk always presented themselves as two futuristic androids. Of course, they didn’t fool anyone, but this was a key aesthetic of their image and branding, and it wasn’t before a few years that they’d show their real selves without their costumes. They had created a fictional background story that would match their aesthetic to their music genre, making them unique and immediately recognizable. Another case in the music industry would be the music band Gorillaz: unlike Daft Punk, this band wasn’t presenting itself by dressing up the group members, they were straight-up cartoon characters. With a carefully created background story for the whole band as well for each one of the characters, Gorillaz managed to build a fascinating fictional world in which to be alive, becoming an interesting art project other than just a music band. The names behind the production of the music where known, but in some measure, it didn’t matter to anyone, the band was composed by THOSE cartoon characters. With each music video, they were expanding their fictional world and making people wanting to see more of it, and people would go to their live concert where the characters would be holograms or projected on big screens. While with these two cases no big issues arose, nowadays with social media the theme of fake personas can be far more concerning, as it was addressed in Black Mirror’s episode “The Waldo Moment”: a cartoonish CGI bear called Waldo who is controlled by a comedian with direct motion capture and is widely followed and successful. After an interview with a politician, we see Waldo entering an election to become a member of the British parliament and almost makes it. Although this scenario is far-fetched, out of politics it is now easy to foresee a digital character gaining enough consensus and success to have a big influence on people’s opinion. I am going to analyze some case studies of artists and studios who are using avatars on social media in different ways, ranging from artistic performances to marketing maneuvers. For each case, I am going to find out how these virtual representations deal with identity, and how their public deals with it. I also want to understand what are the possible drawbacks in the instrumentalization of digital characters from brands, in the terms of ethnicity, gender and sexual orientation of who's creating and controlling the avatars compared to the choosen gender, appeareance and declared sexuality of them.

    Course of Study
    ECAL Art Direction

    Tutors
    Claus Gunti

  • Photography Albums and Intimate Memories in the Digital Era

    Gunawan, Alessia

    ECAL

    2019

    ECAL, 2019

    Abstract
    Photography albums have always been a special place to “preserve” intimate memories with care. They serve as a precious means to gather visual memories that can be re-discovered, brought to light again in a present context and, ultimately, shared with people. They function as an extension of one's identity, especially since individuals make conscious decisions when organizing the album, almost as if they were curating a personal exhibition for other to see by scrupulously selecting the content, framing it and putting each in a sequence, depending on how they decide to narrate these memories and stories. Photography albums, especially the ones including family photos, are also meant to be stored for a long time. They function as a precious archive for future family members to hold onto and to preserve family identity. But in today's digital era, photography albums are not as present anymore. Computer and phone albums have replaced the material object, and photographs reside in virtual clouds. In this essay, I will examine and present as today's model of the alternative family photo album: a family group chat. The media content that is part of the group chat mirrors how we create, consume, exchange and preserve these visual memories in the current time. Additionally, I will also look into how social media collects, selects and recreates memories for users through specific algorithms, shaping users' approach to collective memory and nostalgia. With this in mind, the following questions spontaneously arise: how will we preserve visual memory in the future? Will the physical object of a photography album become a foreign - if not extinct - concept altogether? Will it be possible to spontaneously fall into dusty photography albums or will nostalgia be a precise algorithm offered to us as a paid service?

    Course of Study
    ECAL Art Direction

    Tutors
    Claus Gunti

  • Documenting the Anthropocene–Visual Strategies in Documentary Photography

    Harker, Chris

    ECAL

    2019

    ECAL, 2019

    Abstract
    At the beginning of the 21st century, not a day goes by without news of the manifold environmental disruptions brought upon the planet and its inhabitants. Among these issues is the relentless heating of the earth's atmosphere, the rising of the sea levels, species extinction, mass migration of humans and so on. Topics such as these have become prevalent ones in the scientific discourse as well as political and societal talking points. Various artists have caught up on centering questions of environmental degradation at the forefront of their practice. In the case of documentary photography, the emphasis has long been centered around the notion of making visible the hardships of the world, sometimes with the aspiration to inducing societal change through photographic imagery. In that sense, documentary photography–which is often related to the depiction of natural landscapes–aims to draw the attention of the viewership on a specific topic with the implied wish that that which has been documented change for the better. In the context of the unfolding and making of the so-called Anthropocene, the question of what kind of knowledge photographic practices within the field of the documentary add to the ongoing quest of understanding our predicaments in an environmental context is a prevalent one. In the scope of this thesis, I will discuss how the Anthropocene was and is being documented within the genre of documentary photography on the basis of a selection of artists. First, I will qualify the notion of the Anthropocene as well as establish a set of criteria for efficiently communicating the abstract nature of the Anthropocene-hypothesis. Subsequently, I will look at the theory of documentary photography and discuss the role of the selected artists within this context. In the second part of my thesis, I will investigate and compare the different strategies of visualization that are being employed by these artists. Outlined as categories, these strategies will include work that focuses on collaboration, work that draws on different fields of knowledge production to help the viewer contextualize a certain topic, as well as work that relies on the relation between text and image. Finally, the thesis investigates the question of how artists working in the field of documentary photography make visible the Anthropocene and examine the subsequent aspirations to the communicative powers of these strategies.

    Course of Study
    ECAL Art Direction

    Tutors
    Claus Gunti

  • L'habit-souvenir, le commun et le singulier

    Berthet-Bondet, Carole

    HEAD

    2019

    HEAD, 2019

    MG 9885
    Boite vide
    Capture décran 2019 09 20 à 14 34 58
    Habit souvenir 1 crop a
    Test mep habit souvenir 19
    Tiroirs 8

    Abstract
    Mon travail de mémoire est pensé autour de la notion de l’habit-souvenir ou habit-affection. Ce mémoire a alors pour intention de questionner l’habit-souvenir, ce qui peut le définir et comment il peut acquérir ce statut d’habit-souvenir, lui donnant une intensité et une force de par sa mémoire, sa temporalité, son intimité, sa matérialité et l’affection qu’on lui porte. L’habit-souvenir est à mon sens très personnel et multiple. C’est pourquoi j’ai pensé mon travail sous la forme de fragments, m’inspirant de l’écrit de Roland Barthes Fragments d’un discours amoureux et présentant ainsi des mots, sous la forme d’un abécédaire, faisant un portrait de ce que j’appelle l’habit-souvenir. Ces fragments proposent des lectures différentes, étant parfois des textes, parfois des anecdotes, parfois des citations, parfois des photographies réalisées par une photographe-vidéaste, Marine Vallotton, accentuant l’aspect fragmenté de l ‘habit-souvenir.

    Course of Study
    HEAD Master of Arts in Fashion and Accessories Design

    Tutors
    Aude Fellay

  • The boundary between graphic based letters and typeface

    Kim, Jinhee

    ECAL

    2019

    ECAL, 2019

    Abstract
    The memoir is to see the process of the graphical, expressive typeface to be the structured and systematic typeface. When the graphic designer and type designer make the sketch for the new typeface, it might look more like graphic or lettering based one which represents their desire to find a new shape and exciting form or to express their aesthetic sense. Even it just comes from the trial to give a shape inspired by the plant grown at home. They probably attempt to making up some letters instantly to pursue this pleasurable idea. While embodying this amazing one, they are going to face the disciplines in type design such as unity and readability to distinguish the difference between the lettering and type design. And they would consider the characteristic type to be more systemized and giving the well-structured rhythm. What they did to set up the own framework and format during this journey of the type which they are satisfied in the end? And what was the trials and errors during the journey? On the other hand, the type designer who considers the functional aspect more than putting character aspects in type design think about this phenomenon and trend nowadays in type design?

    Course of Study
    ECAL Art Direction

    Tutors
    Wayne Daly, Roland Früh

  • Avant garde type design in the 90s.

    De La Morinerie, Raphaël

    ECAL

    2019

    ECAL, 2019

    Cover

    Abstract
    In the 1990s, the typography industry has changed radically with the advent of the personal computer. The first Mac Intosh allowed graphic designers to design their own typographies. At that time, modernism lost its interest and a high level of discussion was generated to strengthen the links between language and typography and to propose alternatives to modernist radical nature. Graphic designers were looking for signs that are closer to our immediate universe and are no longer looking for systems that totalize with universally applicable solutions, so they drew them. This research analyses the creative motivations of graphic designers, the needs they meet and the dogmas they react to. This creative abundance has generated many new ideas. Thus, the study of this avant-garde movement makes it possible to realize the extent of their contemporary relevance.

    Course of Study
    ECAL Art Direction

    Tutors
    Roland Frueh and Wayne Daly

  • Geography et Psychogeography à Paris – 1950s

    Kuhnke, Sean

    ECAL

    2019

    ECAL, 2019

    KUHNKE MEMOIRE ECAL ABSTRACT3
    KUHNKE MEMOIRE ECAL ABSTRACT2
    KUHNKE MEMOIRE ECAL ABSTRACT1

    Abstract
    The school-maps produced by the Michard printing press in Paris from the 1830s–1970s feature two sides ; a recto and a verso. They attempt to illustrate a geographic location from two different perspectives ; physic and economic, political and agricultural, ect., ect. These maps were widely used in French schools during this time as an aide for geography and history courses. The text printed on these maps is extremely beautiful, in part due to it’s irregularities. While lettristes, produced the lettering in-house at Michard, due to the long timespan of production, the exact technique for the reproduction of the letters varied. Most of the production was done on a special lithographic transfer paper, papier report, however at times the letters were painted directly onto the zinc plates – which would have had to be done in reverse – perhaps accounting for some of the irregularities and inconsistencies of the letters. These unique forms become interesting to consider when contemporary type designers create typefaces with many alternate characters or entire variable fonts, which are often designed to be able to respond to specific needs or conditions. At the same time, in the same city, Guy Debord and his situationist collaborators were working towards a dramatically different kind of map. Inspired by the ideas of the dérive (Ivan Chtcheglov) and the flâneur (Charles Baudelaire) they aimed not for geography, but Psychogeography ; aiming to create subjective maps based on personal experience, attempting to break down borders as opposed to define them. For my masters thesis at ECAL I will research both the ‘recto’ and the ‘verso’ of mapping in Paris during this time period. Both the ubiquitous school maps produced by Michard, as well as the more underground and countercultural maps produced by the situationists. At the same time I will work on a typeface family inspired by the lettering of the Michard maps ; searching for a final output inspired by the subjective mappings of the situationists, but based on my own experiences.

    Course of Study
    ECAL Art Direction

    Tutors
    Roland Frueh, Wayne Daly, Kai Bernau

  • Löwenherz - Zeit für einen MutAusbruch!

    Deschler, Stefanie

    ZHdK

    2019

    ZHdK, 2019

    02 Entwurf promobild löwenherz

    Abstract
    Shy children are often passive, silent fellow travelers in everyday life, who never have properly learned to defend themselves against their own inhibitions. The energy of teachers and parents is often spent more on aggressive disturbing children than on timid children. There is often a lack of understanding and knowledge about how to deal with timid children. With the conception and implementation of a digital Empathy Game, within the course of my master‘s thesis, I would like to address the research question: How can you sensitize Children (8-10 years) with a Empathy Game to the topic of social anxiety? Unlike classical, therapeutic offers, my work does not pursue any direct therapeutic goals, but rather focuses on sensitizing the social environment of shy children.

    Course of Study
    ZHdK Game Design

    Tutors
    Mela Kocher, Beat Suter

  • Anthropomorphism: The Perfect Spy

    Singh, Pulkit

    ZHdK

    2019

    ZHdK, 2019

    01

    Abstract
    The art of subtly representing serious topics and themes is as difficult as hiding in plain sight especially showing it in multimedia such as Video Games, Movies, TV shows, Comics, etc. But the industry has already been doing it without broadcasting it directly on to the face of the consumer, with the help of their tools. One of the most famous tool used by the industry is Anthropomorphism, the act of humanizing non-human objects and beings into human or humanoid beings. But how does it work? How do they use it to convey the topics they want to discuss? What kind of topics do they discuss? How can one use this tool for their own work? Answer to all these and many more related questions are presented in this thesis, " Anthropomorphism: The Perfect Spy".

    Course of Study
    ZHdK Game Design

    Tutors
    Rene Bauer, Mela Kocher

  • Dawn to Dusk

    lambert, Jeffery

    ECAL

    2019

    ECAL, 2019

    Abstract
    The atmospheric light from dawn to dusk has shaped the way we perceive light and colour. However, artificial light has dramatically changed our course of the day and our relationship with light and nature. Firstly my research will look at some of the most amazing spectacles of light that take place throughout the day, which are categorised as atmospheric optics. I aim to understand what creates them and what they mean to us. It is the oldest light we know and yet still one that fascinates us the most. I will then look at how artificial light has developed and changed our experience with light. This has perhaps encouraged artists to capture and replicate atmospheric light phenomenon. The light and space movement of the 1960’s was short but influential. Its focus was on looking at how we perceive phenomenon with light and its surroundings. This has resulted in more memorable experiences and meaningful relationships with light. This can also be seen in theatrical lighting design which uses techniques that have both influenced artists and architectural lighting. How could these experiences make their way from the gallery and theatre into everyday life? and how could our cities be lit in the future? Could it bring back some lost experience with light and connect us more to natural phenomenon and a daily cycle.

    Course of Study
    ECAL Product Design

    Tutors
    Anniina Koivu, Brynjar Sigurðarson

  • The Domestic Intruder - An Investigation into Aesthetics

    Rhodin, Viktor

    ECAL

    2019

    ECAL, 2019

    Abstract
    An alien has found it’s way into our homes, usually lurking in our cupboards, cellars and garages. A strange looking device that doesn’t seem to belong. A mix of plastics and metals in different colors and shapes, sometimes looking rather dull, sometimes like a water gun but most of the time quite odd. The fact of the matter is that it has been present for long time, it has just changed shape. Since it’s release on the market over 100 years ago it has turned into one of our best domestic companions, we have grown used to and accepted it. Throughout the years it has remained one of the most recognizable and iconic objects in our domestic environments, yet most of us prefer to hide it. I will investigate and question the sense of this peculiar aesthetic by looking at design and related sociocultural history, followed by a research into design philosophy, product language and semiotics.

    Course of Study
    ECAL Product Design

    Tutors
    Anniina Koivu, Brynjar Sigurdarson

  • THE INTERPASSIVE CITIZEN

    Garibovic, Amir

    ZHdK

    2019

    ZHdK, 2019

    Abstract
    Technologically advanced societies live in an urban environment with highly diverse interests and life-designs, which are organised rapidly upon emergence of the new. Thoughts and ideas can be materialised and therefore communicated via architecture, landscape and devices, to invite the imagination of citizens and call for engagement. This opportunity is missed by the functional and spectacle-oriented urban community, which is prone to illusory activity, and becomes itself the producer of passivity, where experiences are shunned and delegated away. The thesis project aims to develop a set of fictional design objects or devices, that inquire interpassivity in the public space and demonstrate its effectiveness.

    Course of Study
    ZHdK Interaction Design

    Tutors
    Dr. Björn Franke & Max Rheiner

  • The Show Must Go On: Out, Behind, In, With, (and/or) About

    Kim, Nayoung

    ECAL

    2019

    ECAL, 2019

    Abstract
    This thesis presents thorough observation and research about different usages, functions, and methods of integrating typography in performance. It introduces five categories divided by the level of integration of typography in the performance; from surtitles, where type is functionally used as an 1-dimensional communication device, to more dominant stage element where type becomes the main purpose of the performance. It explores, analyzes, categorizes, and showcases different sides, or roles, of typography that have been expanding along with the development of technology. While focusing on utilization of typography in theater stages, it also includes a few other related medias such as cinema and art performance.

    Course of Study
    ECAL Art Direction

    Tutors
    Roland Frueh, Wayne Daly

  • Hidden Messages

    Noelle, Lorenz

    ECAL

    2019

    ECAL, 2019

    Abstract
    About the interralations between human and object The aim of the memoire is to investigate the interactions between customer and object from the point of view of a product designer.   How must an object be designed in order to influence the behavior, emotions and use of the customer in the right way?  What conscious decisions can be made during the design process by applying the methods of nudging, emotional design and affordance ? 

    Course of Study
    ECAL Product Design

    Tutors
    Anniina Koivu, Brynjar Sigurðarson

  • Arabic Letter-Forms in Motion: Towards a Multidisciplinary Type Design Space(s)

    Harik, Francois

    HEAD

    2019

    HEAD, 2019

    Abstract
    My thesis discusses the Arabic letter-forms in motion and the possibility of rethinking and remapping their existent type design spaces. It suggests newly reshaped and multidisciplinary design space(s) giving the Arabic letter-forms the ability to adapt to different environments and technologies. This process will be referred to, in this research paper, as Arabtation, where Arabic letter-forms will evolve and open up to new possibilities, and potentially be set in motion.

    Course of Study
    HEAD Master Media Design

    Tutors
    Daniel Sciboz

    File
    thesis-text-version06.pdf

  • VERDANT

    Rey, Tanya

    ZHdK

    2019

    ZHdK, 2019

    THE NEW VERDANT Tanya Rey 001

    Abstract
    This thesis aims to explore the positive effect of the relationship between nature and citizens in an urban interior environment, focusing on the fusion of sustainable materials and botanical elements with urban construction.  As humanity becomes more urbanized, time spent indoors increases. The most polluted air is found in cities, especially in closed spaces, where it is up to five times more polluted than the air in outdoor spaces. Several studies have indicated that green life can lessen the contamination of volatile organic compounds and improve indoor air quality. Besides, interaction with plants is believed to change human health and behavior, for example by improving productivity and mental well-being. Moreover, the use of sustainable materials has become an integral part of the environmental cause but are not yet wholly involved in green facilities.  This thesis will analyze the information gained from three research questions that aim to implement botanical within spaces. A selection of the gathered data will then lay the theoretical groundwork for a model of an indoor living environment capable of providing biophilic benefits in interior spaces through sustainable resources.

    Course of Study
    ZHdK Product Design

    Tutors
    Martin Meir, Aela Vogel

    File
    Verdant-_-CHAPTER-I.pdf

  • Camera in Charge

    Kumkumoğlu, Doruk

    ECAL

    2019

    ECAL, 2019

    Abstract
    "Camera in Charge" is a research project exploring current advancements in computational photography technologies and their implementation in consumer devices, with the focus being mainly on smartphones. This project also aims to critically approach the camera-user relationship redefined by these new technologies, addressing the presence of computation in the decision making process of smartphone photography. In the final chapter future implementations and possible implications will be discussed with a speculative approach. This research project will examine the topic in four chapters: Computational Photography / Computer Vision, Image Enhancement, Camera Authority, and Beyond Image Enhancement. The first chapter is intended as an introduction to computational photography. I will describe what computational photography is in simple terms, explain the origin of the field and it’s current state. This chapter will also briefly exemplify contemporary computational photography technologies that are mostly in use in smartphones today, such as scene recognition, object tagging, image manipulation and enhancement algorithms. The intention is to lay a concrete groundwork for the scope of technologies I will be talking about and to get the reader familiar with the technical terms that will be used extensively for the continuation of this paper. The following chapter "Image Enhancement" will define image enhancement in connection to computational photography. The aim of this chapter is to explain the current state of image enhancement technologies available for smartphones, and to explore how these technologies advanced the industry, and in turn enabled users to achieve great photographic results within the constraints of the smartphone form factor. In this chapter I will also mention specific technologies such as deep learning and image labeling, and how algorithms getting much better at recognizing elements in a picture results in much more precise control of enhancement which in turn allows the users to create improved images. In the next chapter "Camera Authority" I will explain how camera systems and image processing algorithms starting to take more control, deciding crucial elements of the final picture and question if camera deciding on behalf of the operator creates a dilemma of authority, discussing questions such as "who is in charge of the process of photography?" and "Can camera make major aesthetic decisions?" The sub-chapter "Automated Aesthetics " will explore deeper into the concept of computer aesthetics, questioning if camera taking control of creative decisions is good or a bad thing, meanwhile analyzing the relationship of these technologies to artists and professional image creators. Lastly, the final chapter "Beyond Image Enhancement" will focus on the future of the computational photography field and speculate on possible advancements and implications by analyzing the rate of advancement of the field in the last decade. Computational photography is evolving at a very fast pace, mainly as a result of smartphone manufacturers funding research or developing their own technology in house to have an edge over the competitors. The fields has seen incredible advancements in just the last 5 years, but it is only the beginning and we should expect revolutionary advancements coming to our mobile devices that will alter not just the way we take photographs but the way we interact, communicate and present ourselves. In this final chapter I will try to make sensible and useful predictions of such future implementations and conclude the essay with a forward looking and optimistic note.

    Course of Study
    ECAL Art Direction

    Tutors
    Claus Gunti

  • My island is a radiant bosom of timeless springs

    Pjörrt, Igor

    ECAL

    2019

    ECAL, 2019

    Abstract
    Preoccupied with the fragile and impermanent state of things, my first steps in photography naturally saw a closeness between me and my family. An impeding departure from my home island in Madeira became clear and with it the idea that everything can be lost to time. At an age where we begin to wander the intricacies of sexuality and romantic relationships, leaving behind my mother I grew concerned with the unique unconditional love of motherhood. The figure of the mother began to represent something larger than herself until it re-appeared in the shape of a static island, a place to be revisited again and again. This complicated, distant link manifested itself in a very particular and unexplainable longing, itself a very prominent sentiment in Portuguese culture. As the memories I had built until then seemed to be projected onto my life as a grownup, my sense of self, of space and time became intertwined between these imaginary epochs I had divided in my head. In a perhaps naive attempt to access these remote connections I turned to my visual memory as the most eloquent tool not only to uncover unapparent patterns and links but also for evoking visions of the future. Through a seemingly disparate analysis of my relation to images in the span of my youth, I attempt to retrace my own memory, probing into both the abundant and poor corners of reminiscence, meditating on its agency in identity formation and identifying the shift in the acts of recollection and mental processing of images in the golden age of the Internet. The island replaces the birdcages, the treasure rooms and the palaces in the metaphors of memory throughout the ages, its unique geological and biodiverse features suggesting a poetic understanding of isolation, migration and distance.

    Course of Study
    ECAL Art Direction

    Tutors
    Claus Gunti

  • Typographie comme Topographie

    Pellegrini, Maximilien

    HEAD

    2019

    HEAD, 2019

    Max mem1278
    Max mem1462
    Max mem1466
    Max mem1478
    Max mem1480
    Max mem1483

    Abstract
    One morning in the 1960s, the Swiss typographer Wolfgang Weingart was the victim of a hazard: a drawer full of typographic characters - formerly made of lead - fell to the ground. Visionary, he decided to group them in a circular ring, then to turn them over in order to reveal their hidden sides. From this act, Wein- gart gave birth to a new composition by creating a typographic printing project entitled « Round Compositions ». Six years later, during a trip to ancient Phoenicia - the cradle of our Greek-Roman writing - he photographed cities such as Damascus and Palmy- ra, their ruins and fragments. It is in his book retracing the entirety of his work that Weingart will link his two projects by comparing his photographs with « Round Compositions », thus creating a visual metaphor, a new approach at the image of the lead character. A typography as a topography.

    Course of Study
    HEAD Master in Design - Space and Communication

    Tutors
    Thierry Chancogne

  • The Untapped Gold Mine Of Yoga Research: Your Key To understanding Health and Prevention

    Berglar, Anncharlott

    ZHdK

    2019

    ZHdK, 2019

    Abstract
    Yoga should be integrated into the healthcare system. It is a discipline developed to keep mind and body healthy for spiritual development. Science confirms a variety of those health benefits. This science shall be visualized in 3D and 2D images as a database-type website in order to raise awareness of yoga’s importance.

    Course of Study
    ZHdK Knowledge Visualization

    Tutors
    Niklaus Heeb

  • Ndébélé®, d'un art traditionnel à un produit commercial

    Ségolène, Nicolazic

    HEAD

    2019

    HEAD, 2019

    Capture décran 2019 05 18 à 11 22 47
    Capture décran 2019 10 19 à 22 33 34
    Capture décran 2019 10 21 à 10 37 51
    Capture décran 2019 10 25 à 14 42 56
    DSC 0090
    Portrait esther mahlangu
    South African artist Esther Mahlangu 81 outside her home AFP GULSHAN KHAN

    Abstract
    L’art Ndébélé est un art traditionnel originaire d’Afrique du Sud. Depuis le début des années 1990, ce savoir-faire exclusivement féminin a connu une notoriété internationale grandissante, incarnée par une femme : Esther Mahlangu, femme Ndébélé de 86 ans qui parcours le monde entier depuis trente ans afin de faire connaitre son art. Ndébélé® interroge sur la diffusion d’un art traditionnel africain en occident et comment son statut ethnique favorise sa notoriété internationale. Les stratégies adoptées par Esther Mahlangu pour diffusés l’art Ndébélé dans le monde mêle transmission d’une tradition, revendication identitaire, et utilisation de moyen de communication moderne, elle devient alors une icône et son origine une marque.

    Course of Study
    HEAD Master in Design - Space and Communication

    Tutors
    Jérémie Cerman

  • CAR WASH : DON'T DRIVE DIRTY

    Terraillon, Claire

    HEAD

    2019

    HEAD, 2019

    Capture décran 2019 10 29 à 21 12 44
    Buick model 10 touring runabout 1
    4
    Autowp ru lasalle roadster 5
    1948 Cadillac Fleetwood Sixty Special
    Chrysler
    B66ec99f582f4ca7 large
    1
    Tumblr d43451980e1c6873a7ae37587d1047da 9f88d885 500
    East 23rd Public Bath

    Abstract
    Le Car Wash entre les années 1920 et 1960 reflétait l’évolution de la société américaine engendrée par la démocratisation de l’automobile, symbole de l’industrie capitaliste moderne. Le transfert des techniques d’hygiène domestique vers celles du lavage automobile s’inscrivait en 1920 à la fois comme une réponse aux théories hygiénistes du milieu du 19ème et du début du 20ème siècle, mais répondait aussi à un bouleversement social généré par la popularisation de la voiture par le biais du Model T d’Henry Ford. Dès la fin des années 1920, l’industrie automobile américaine était transformée par le premier designer automobile : Harley Earl. Grâce à lui la voiture s’allongeait et arborait de nouvelles couleurs qui répondaient à un intérêt grandissant pour la beauté des véhicules. Parallèlement, les Car Wash Sherman Equipment connaissaient les mêmes changements que la voiture. Ils tentaient de copier le confort de la sphère domestique et l’esthétique colorée de l’électroménager alors rattachés dans les années 1960 à l’univers féminin, dans le but de satisfaire une clientèle majoritairement masculine et pour nourrir un succès commercial androcentré.

    Course of Study
    HEAD Master in Design - Space and Communication

    Tutors
    Alexandra Midal

  • L'Ambroisie des rêveurs

    Rosset, Johan

    HEAD

    2019

    HEAD, 2019

    381b640b4ff3df2a4f4748e77372c2ec
    RNS SUMMER LOVE7 072117
    Trips Kramer Inside Outside Talk Slides crop 019

    Abstract
    L’Ambroise des rêveurs est un essai qui traite des formes physiques, psychiques et sociales du LSD. Cette substance créée par Albert Hoffmann en 1923 a été le principal moteur d’une révolution socioculturelle qui à débuté aux États-Unis dans les années 1960. Elle fut amorcée par de nombreux artistes mais aussi par des mouvements contestataires de la contre-culture en réaction au contexte politique et social de l’époque, particulièrement marqué par la guerre du Vietnam, l’écart entre les classes sociales ainsi que l’éloge de la surconsommation. La contre-culture s’est donc parfois soulevée en prônant cette nouvelle substance. C’est durant cette période qui constitue l’âge d’or du LSD, de 1960 à 1970, que différents artistes tel que les Merry Pranksters ou encore (autre nom d’artiste) utilisent cette drogue comme moteur de création. Des nouvelles formes de créativité, de nouvelles façons de penser et d’autres styles de vie ont ainsi émergés. Le mouvement psychédélique était né.

    Course of Study
    HKB MA Design

    Tutors
    Thierry Chancogne

  • Visualizing the interaction between soil biodiversity and climate change

    Lu, yucan

    ZHdK

    2019

    ZHdK, 2019

    截屏2019 10 25上午11 55 38

    Abstract
    By the year 2050 about two billion more people may live on planet earth than do today and all of these people will need to eat. Human activities and their effects on the climate and environment cause unprecedented animal and plant extinctions, loss in biodiversity and endanger animal interaction between soil biodiversity and climate change under different soil treatment for first year students to study or general education. In the context of more and more subdivided knowledge, I explore the application of new forms of knowledge visualization in education and teaching, combine different visualization tools, increase their interactivity and I hope to have an important impact on knowledge communication and stimulate students' learning.

    Course of Study
    ZHdK Knowledge Visualization

    Tutors
    Holler Alessandro

  • La kitschification du coquillage

    Le Baron, Philomène

    HEAD

    2019

    HEAD, 2019

    9d9a7bbbba2213ea3b640fbe1bfd5ce1
    Capture décran 2019 10 20 à 12 27 15
    Capture décran 2019 11 13 à 11 09 40
    Littlemermaid 783
    1936
    Vlcsnap 7001969

    Abstract
    Ramassés sur les plages ou chinés à petits prix, les coquillages séduisent depuis toujours voyageurs et touristes. Témoins de leurs explorations, ces bijoux des profondeurs tenaient une place de choix dans les cabinets de curiosités du XVIIe siècle. Ils étaient collectionnés pour leur inépuisable vocabulaire de formes et leur esthétique singulière. Le motif du coquillage a été beaucoup repris dans différents domaines liés au arts décoratifs, comme ornement, comme matière puis comme véritable forme. Aujourd’hui, cette forme est encore très représentée dans la mode, le design, l’architecture et les décors populaires. Elle incarne les caractéristiques d’un phénomène esthétique et social lié à la production industrielle et à la société de consommation : le kitsch. Ce mémoire explore la kitschification du coquillage dès la deuxième moitié du XXe siècle. Différents exemples allant de la sur-fonctionnalisation de sa forme, la sur-imitation de sa matière, et la sur-dimensionnalisation de sa taille démontrent le lien entre l’univers marin et le monde du kitsch.

    Course of Study
    HEAD Master in Design - Space and Communication

    Tutors
    Jérémie Cerman

  • Beyond Patients

    Ardelean, Luzie

    ZHdK

    2019

    ZHdK, 2019

    Beyond Patients design perspective
    Beyond Patients participatory design

    Abstract
    This research project aims to create a positive expe­rience for people living with a progressively worsen­ing condition like Parkinson's Disease. The number of people diagnosed with Parkinson's is predicted to increase. Yet, we currently don't know what causes the disease, nor do we have a cure. In ad­dition to the natural sciences, design research and product design, too, have the potential to positively impact the lives of those affected. Project goal is the creation of a contribution to the assistive technology market, whether in the form of a device or service. A human-centred design approach is applied to en­sure that the target audience are at the heart of the project and its outcome at all times.

    Course of Study
    ZHdK Product Design

    Tutors
    Annina Gähwiler, Aela Vogel, Martin Meier, Robert Wettstein

  • Built Sketch with a Long Life, une brève histoire d'innovation

    Janin, Margaux

    HEAD

    2019

    HEAD, 2019

    Bucky bleu1

    Abstract
    Built Sketch with a Long Life, une brève histoire d’innovation raconte le tiraillement entre la fascination et l’aversion pour la machine dans le contexte des années 1930 au travers de la pratique de Richard Buckminster Fuller et de son concept Dymaxion. Ce concept est une succession d’objets (maison, voiture, salle de bain…) aux qualités innovantes mais qui resteront des prototypes. Fuller est habité par la tension que provoque la machine et c’est ce qui le pousse à émettre les premiers principes écologiques. Cette fiction cherche à obtenir une vision global du monde afin d’appréhender au mieux le futur de la technologie.

    Course of Study
    HEAD Master in Design - Space and Communication

    Tutors
    Alexandra Midal

  • pics or it didn't happen

    Friess, Julie

    ZHdK

    2019

    ZHdK, 2019

    Scan 34

    Abstract
    Inhalt des Projekts ist die Aufarbeitung eines analogen Bildarchivs. Urheber des Materials ist ein deutscher Reisejournalist im Ruhestand, der zwischen den 1980er und frühen 2000er Jahren hauptsächlich für Boulevardzeitungen mit Bild und Text von ungewöhnlichen Reisen berichtete. Im Mittelpunkt dieser Arbeit steht nun der Umgang mit einer Vielzahl an Bildern und damit einhergehenden verschiedenen Kontexten: Reisen, Vermittlung, Bild, Information, Unterhaltung, Fremde, Aneignung, Zeit, »social photography«, storrytelling etc. Mich interessiert, wie man durch den Designtransfer aus altem Archiv-Material Wissen generieren und einen zeitgemässen und interessanten Mehrwert gewinnen kann.

    Course of Study
    ZHdK Visual Communication

    Tutors
    Sarah Owens

    File
    TEST_2.pdf

  • Sustainability revisited: An attempted description of fashion futuring inspired by collective dress

    Mabiala, Tara

    HEAD

    2019

    HEAD, 2019

    Abstract
    What exactly is sustainable and ethical fashion design beyond sustainable production and sourcing? My opinion, which I found was also that of industry leaders such as Stefano Martinetto and François Souche (who I heard speak at Premiere Vision in a talk about whether “Upcycling could be the future of fashion?”), is that in the times we are living in, all fashion that is produced should have sustainability in mind. Sustainability should not be a unique selling point anymore…rather a minimum requirement when producing a collection. But beyond production and sourcing, can something else be thought, imagined so as to “make fashion more sustainable”? I will be talking about the importance of sustainability specifically relating to the fashion industry with the possibilities and contradictions it entails. I find it important to cover the “Anthropocene” term so as to understand certain specificities that characterize the age we are living in such as the responsibility but also the motivation for change we feel. These will lay the context before I can explain the emotional and anxiety-lead aspect I find relates to the ecological crisis and the sense of urgency which ensues. A sense of urgency, that is understood throughout the fashion chain from industry leaders to consumers but of which the blame is often put on the individual consumer. As an opening to solutions I chose to talk about one of many fashion futuring theories opposing two ideas; one focused on social, behavioural change and the other on the opportunities technology gives. I wanted to be hands on and approach the question of fashion as expression, individually as well as collectively, with a survey to try and understand the connection people have to how they dress and what they want to say about themselves through their clothing. What the survey taught me is the notion of collectivity hidden behind what people want to say with how they dress. The notions of individual vs. collective are very important in this context, but what interests me most is the collective dress. It is a solution for voicing identity but also for consuming less and/or differently. This affirmation of identity through collective dress stems from some type of self-care: being loyal to your ideology throughout right up to clothing. I will talk about two examples more precisely: The women of the black civil rights movements as well as the punk movement. Maybe something could come out of inspiring ourselves of these groups that stay true to their line and ideologies.

    Course of Study
    HEAD Master of Arts in Fashion and Accessories Design

    Tutors
    Aya Noël

  • The Mathematical Permeability

    Rinke, Suntka

    ZHdK

    2019

    ZHdK, 2019

    Abstract
    Today’s world is driven more intense by mathematics than ever; it occurs in places, where people would neither expect nor recognise it. It is an elemental part of e.g. recommendation systems, self-driving cars, biometrical recognitions like the unlock function of contemporary smart phones. Similar to convenience food, those features are consumed without an understanding of its contents, whether it is healthy for you or what the longterm impact is. In contrast to that, mathematicians apply abstract thinking in general and to those topics. This master project explores the boundaries and complications between mathematical understanding and everyday’s life.

    Course of Study
    ZHdK Interaction Design

    Tutors
    .

  • Le chant des roches

    Bouard Cart, Samy

    HEAD

    2019

    HEAD, 2019

    Abstract
    In 2002, at the age of six, I met the seismologist Maurice Baudor. He revealed something to me that I could never forget. How could this geologist formulate such a fanciful hypothesis? Following his tragic death in 2007, I learnt that he had worked from his home on a project that he kept secret. To see things more clearly in this, the only solution was to browse through the archives and lead a detective-designer job, in order to understand his process and be a witness of his journey. My project aims to reveal the scientific research he conducted, thereby questioning the status of knowledge, portrayed by both the development of one’s work, and the presentation of its conclusions.

    Course of Study
    HEAD Master in Design - Space and Communication

    Tutors
    Alexandra Midal

  • Le Corset Gaches-Sarraute

    Aubouy, Cecilia

    HEAD

    2019

    HEAD, 2019

    Abstract
    The corset, the most essential element in fashionable dress for nearly 400 years, molds and shapes the female body. During the 19th century, women lace the corset ever so tightly against their body, thus becoming very damaging to their health. In 1895, the French doctor Inès Gaches-Sarraute stands out from the other corset reformers and designs a new corset that would be free of harm and actually improve women’s physical conditions. She imposes new rules to follow while designing a corset, and influences a large number of corset makers. Fashion follows her model, thereby radically transforming the female silhouette in society in France and abroad. From a flared body pinched at the waist, the woman is now represented by a slender and sinuous silhouette, called the S-bend. The designs from Gaches-Sarraute give women a newfound physical freedom. It launches an evolution of mentalities. Moving away from the constraints imposed by the previous corset, the new corset contributes to female emancipation. Le corset, élément dominant de la mode durant près de 400 ans, moule et donne forme au corps de celle qui le porte. Durant le 19ème siècle, les femmes portent le corset très serré contre leurs corps, ce qui leur cause de nombreux problèmes physiologiques. En 1895, le médecin Inès Gaches-Sarraute se démarque des autres réformateurs du corset, et développé un nouveau corset qui ne présente aucun dangers à la femme, et même améliore sa condition physique. Elle impose des nouvelles lois à suivre pour la fabrication d’un corset plus sain, influençant grand nombre de corsetiers. Adapté par la mode, il transforme radicalement la silhouette féminine en société en France et ailleurs. La femme au corps évasé et pincé à la taille se retrouve avec une silhouette onduleuse et élancée, surnommée ligne S. Le nouveau design de Gaches-Sarraute offre une nouvelle liberté physique à celle qui le porte. Une révolution de mentalité apparait. En s’éloignant des contraintes imposées par l’ancien corset, son nouveau corset participe ainsi à l’émancipation des femmes.

    Course of Study
    HEAD Master in Design - Space and Communication

    Tutors
    Sebastien Quequet

  • Earth( e)scape

    Masarik, Jozef Eduard

    HEAD

    2019

    HEAD, 2019

    Abstract
    Raising of Chicago, a visionary project of the 19th century engineering, was a project consisting of lifting the whole city up to 14 feet above the city’s original location. Such projects blending the real and the unbelievable were bringing the tradition of technology used to execute wonders or spectacle, which was disappearing at the time, back to life. The consecutive evolution of the perception of the relationship between the city of Chicago and the Earth is closely linked to the 19th century imaginary, represented in the research especially by the miasmatic theory and technological optimism. The perception of the city’s natural conditions and the steps leading to the project clarify the raising and its aspirations. In order to discover the relationship between the raised city and the Earth, the raising is studied in the context of the 19th century imaginary and theories of built environment.

    Course of Study
    HEAD Master in Design - Space and Communication

    Tutors
    Sébastien Quéquet

    File
    HeavenlySidewalks-rotated.pdf

  • Face to face

    Lecuyer, Amandine

    HEAD

    2019

    HEAD, 2019

    Scèene aouina retouchée

    Abstract
    In 1935, during the French colonialism in the Maghreb, the French-British director Edmond Thonger Gréville completed his film Princesse Tam Tam. Josephine Baker plays the protagonist of Aouïna, a poor young Tunisian woman. Max de Mirecourt, a French writer, bored by the Parisian life he shares with his wife Lucie, goes to Tunisia to find inspiration for the writing of his next book. He meets Aouïna and between the two protagonists, an ambiguous relationship begins to develop. Max, in the role of the settler, chose her as the heroine of his novel : she played the roles of the colonized woman, and a "Princesse d'Afrique lointaine". Face à Face is a comparative study of synchronized vs. syncopated rhythms in the musical comedy Princess Tam Tam. The dances underline the film's narrative and reveal a political dimension embodied by the movements of the synchronized dancers and Aouïna: from the exploitation and androcentric representation of the woman's body, to colonialism and racial hierarchization. Joséphine Baker, the French-American actress and dancer, and Aouïna, whom she embodies, present the way in which the springs of a complex political, gender and racial construction were established in France during the years 1920-1930.

    Course of Study
    HEAD Master in Design - Space and Communication

    Tutors
    Alexandra Midal

  • Space and Time. Stories from the Neuchâtel Observatory

    Schatz, Marc-Olivier

    HKB

    2019

    HKB, 2019

    Neuchatel Observatory

    Abstract
    Since the modern era, astronomical observatories have been the places where the sky was primarily observed and time was measured. For almost 150 years (1858-2007), the Neuchâtel Observatory was a world reference for determining and distributing time. Thanks to the time signal it distributed daily on the radio from the 1930s, it shaped the daily life time for generations of people in Switzerland. But its national and scientific importance have been forgotten. My project aims to conceive and design an exhibition with two objectives: to introduce the public to this emblematic object of Swiss scientific heritage and to question, through the Observatory, time and its measurement. https://blog.bfh.ch/moschatz/

    Course of Study
    HKB MA Design

    Tutors
    Rossella Baldi

  • The role of inclusive design within an intergenerational community

    Hossli, Sarah

    ECAL

    2019

    ECAL, 2019

    Abstract
    A few decades ago, it was common for families from different generations to live together in the same house. As challenges were faced together, families offered support to one another. The break-up of this family model and the desire for individualism have led to social challenges: isolation, loneliness, economic poverty, and an increased need for help or life support. Children and the elderly are those who mostly require support and care. These days, this task is being outsourced more and more to professionals. To encourage intergenerational exchange between age groups, the number of generational houses (combining day-care centres and care homes under one roof) being built has seen a rise in Japan, the USA, and Europe since 1970. One might think that the success of these facilities depends on architectural and social components. On-site field research has shown that product design has great potential in the everyday intergenerational living. But when it comes to furnishing and equipping generation houses, most employees share the same opinion: a generation house does not need any other objects or furniture than a care home or a day-care centre. There are multipurpose rooms and any required age specific equipment can be rearranged to suit the event. But let‘s look at it from a designer‘s perspective: What product language could be applied to furniture, tableware, tools and entertainment, one that works for all ages and people with disabilities so that no one feels excluded? This is the goal of inclusive design: to design for the whole population. (In Europe it is called inclusive design — in America and Japan universal design.) The ones who mostly face difficulties in day-to-day living are the elderly people. Ageing population continues to increase and with medical and technical advances, seniors are expected to live longer. By 2035, the number of people over 65 will have doubled and will make up the majority of consumers. The inclusive design approach can play an important role in enriching the lives of everyone, the elderly included. What impacts will demographic ageing have on the design of public areas, public transportation, and consumer goods? „Inclusive Design doesn‘t mean we‘re designing one thing for all people. It means we‘re designing a diversity of ways for people to participate.“ (Kat Holmes, Speech „Rethink What Inclusive Design Means“, Adobe 99u conference in New York, 08.05.2019, Youtube.com)

    Course of Study
    ECAL Product Design

    Tutors
    Anniina Koivu, Brynjar Sigurðarson, Camille Blin

  • Text on Screen

    Knabe, Victoria

    ZHdK

    2019

    ZHdK, 2019

    Abstract
    Text on screen is still heavily influenced by the printed medium in the way it is read and displayed. How can the possibilities of the browser be used to create a non-linear, interactive reading experience?

    Course of Study
    ZHdK Visual Communication

    Tutors
    Sarah Owens

  • le masque — connecteur cosmique

    Dravé, Fatou

    HEAD

    2019

    HEAD, 2019

    Sirige
    Heleneleloupmuséeduquaibranli
    Keepingtheculture
    Onjupiter
    Headwrapnew
    Cyrus K Abiru Art 6 1440x1440
    Capture décran 2019 10 31 à 12 13 19
    07790010 6 2117fc b 1e0b50fbb1426d08b6ca7127633b8e5b99c28abe s1600 c85
    87129628087019 5636f69e56a9d
    Robertpruitt12

    Abstract
    This thesis explores through the case of the mask, an object that’s both traditional and futuristic, the ways in which actors of the afrofuturist movement use aesthetics for political purposes.

    Course of Study
    HEAD Master in Design - Space and Communication

    Tutors
    Thierry Chancogne

  • Znamya The Space Reflector

    Saiz Soler, Pau

    HEAD

    2019

    HEAD, 2019

    P 2

    Abstract
    The following work studies the case of Znamya, a Russian satellite launched in 1993, designed to reflect the light of the sun to illuminate the earth at night. Conceived as part of the Soviet space program, Znamya's original plan projected a fleet of satellites that would allow for total control of the lighting of territory, 24 hours a day. Originally the idea was to provide extra hours of light for agriculture or illuminate cities. I analyze how Znamya became a totalitarian technology for the control of public light: Its spotlight centralized the source of light to restrict its control to the administration. The light of the sun became an expressive medium to hijack the night and send a propagandistic message. Here described as ideological terraforming, the light of Znamya changed the weather to reinforce Soviet and Russian nationalism.

    Course of Study
    HEAD Master in Design - Space and Communication

    Tutors
    Alexandra Midal

  • OP in Vogue

    Galleani d'Agliano, Elena

    HEAD

    2019

    HEAD, 2019

    Stile it Chrissie Shrimpton modeling an op art coat designed by Ossie Clark 1965
    Penn 6
    1966 Giugno 4
    1966 Febbraio 22

    Abstract
    Towards the mid-Sixties, an artistic movement known as Op(tical) art became a mainstream phenomenon in mass culture, significantly influencing until the following decade the aesthetics of multiple sectors, including fashion. The fashion magazines were filled with pictures with a recurrent Op language, that dominated the aesthetic of fashion and photography for several years. In specific, Vogue magazine was the leader in this process, gathering together la crème de la crème of the contemporaneous fashion photographers, that defined a new photographic genre.

    Course of Study
    HEAD Master in Design - Space and Communication

    Tutors
    Jerèmie Cerman

  • Desirable Objects

    Jiang, Xinyi

    ECAL

    2018

    ECAL, 2018

    Desirable objects 880 1

    Abstract
    We are a generation born to consume. The process of consuming started ever since human were born, but the word consumerism was only pushed to the stage by the growing middle-class standing for purchasing rather than necessity. We never have more possessions as we do now. We are longing for certain objects that do not belong to basic Safety and Physiological stage (defined by Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs) any more. We consume to fulfill our physical and spiritual world, whether on our own initiative or being unconsciously influenced. The thesis aims to have a brief look into the history of desirable objects, mainly after Second Industrial Revolution. A few representative objects in different field are picked to discuss about the mechanism of it. Among those items, have a zoom-in in desirable but “totally pointless” objects. Help designers better understand the psychology behind desirable objects and get some inspirations to work in the commercial world.

    Course of Study
    ECAL Product Design

    Tutors
    Anniina Koivu

    File
    cc25ab40d8bb89839a71648d6131178e.pdf

  • Iron Curtain Objects

    Gaytandjiev, Nikola

    ECAL

    2018

    ECAL, 2018

    Iron curtain objects 884 1
    Iron curtain objects 884 2
    Iron curtain objects 884 3

    Abstract
    After the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991, the world’s view of the USSR and the Eastern Block was one of total failure. A failed system, politically and economically, especially in the shadow of the USA and its prosperity. Indeed, the USSR was a drastically different place from the west. The environment was extremely restricted, shortages of goods was a common problem and freedom of expression was looked down upon. The effect of this on design was profound. In fact, the word ‘design’ was seen as a bad word, as well as the activity of designing itself. Instead, designers were called ‘artistic engineers’ thus making them anonymous in the large machine of the USSR. However, it is a common misconception that the USSR did not produce anything useful or of good quality. In fact, there was a huge number of designs which were conceived and showed a different standpoint on product design which took into account the status quo of the time. Some of these objects are no longer relevant in a changing world, but they show that even in a strict, suppressive and de-humanising environment as was in the Eastern Block between the 1930s and 1991, interesting objects came to life which in themselves are a time capsule of daily and professional life at the time. This memoire takes a look into case studies of everyday objects of the USSR to investigate how different settings and environments can make objects different.

    Course of Study
    ECAL Product Design

    Tutors
    Anniina Koivu

    File
    79bea1b35233a6c187994f600d66b86a.jpg

  • Stackability - A principle of modern design

    Kahlfeldt, Luisa

    ECAL

    2018

    ECAL, 2018

    Abstract
    Stacking things is a daily, omnipresent action that is practised by nearly everyone. We stack unread newspapers, neatly fold sweaters on top of each other and pile cans of soup in the pantry. It is a fundamental cultural technique, born from the rational need to save space, time and resources. From the cups, mugs and plates in our kitchen to the chairs we sit on - we expect the products that surround us to be stackable. The need for stackability has shaped the aesthetic of our consumer products and plays an important part in the culture we live in. Beyond the purely rational, there is also a visual and decorative pleasure in stacking things and creating order. As omnipresent as the concept is in our lives, it has however remained little regarded and researched.

    Course of Study
    ECAL Product Design

    Tutors
    Anniina Koivu, Brynjar Sigurðarson

  • Artificial Intelligence Involved Type Design

    Shi, Shuhui

    ECAL

    2018

    ECAL, 2018

    Abstract
    Type design is getting more and more geeky. Many type designers and engineers start to develop their own tools, so do I. As a type designer, I believe technology provides more choices for art. Thanks to the quick development of Artificial Intelligence, specifically in computer vision, which could offer a chance for type designers to release their minds from repetitive works. Especially for Chinese type design, it could be a revolution for the whole industry. Type design could not become a hot topic in China nowadays mostly because of it has basically the highest learning cost among all languages. The minimum Character set requires at least 6’000 characters, that requires at least one year’s work for one single typeface. In order to change this situation, the best way is to provide a better atmosphere by upgrade tool of production, so that more people would try to be a type designer. I started the project “AI Tools for Type Design” in 2018, and it becomes a collaboration project between ECAL / EPFL. This memoire records the entire process of the project, and explores the potential of using AI technology to create new tools and solve problems in type design field. I am not a technical expert, through this memoire I will show the view as a type designer, how do I participate in this technical project, what did I provide and learn. In order to show the whole process, the main body of the memoire is experiment and discussion logs showed in timeline. These logs will show thoughts, questions, codes, results in every experiments and discussions I had about this project.

    Course of Study
    ECAL Type Design

    Tutors
    Roland Früh, Wayne Daily

  • Mini books during the Communist era in Hungary (1956-1989)

    Benedek, Takács

    ECAL

    2018

    ECAL, 2018

    Abstract
    Beginning from the 1970s until the late 80s the production of mini books became extremely popular during the soviet era in Hungary. During the socialist era in Hungary from 1948 until 1956 the capacity of print shops was growing as high as 722%. The circumstances probably helped and offered an intense atmosphere where printers had the practice, capacity and resources to make mini books. The cause of the end of this era was the downtrend of the printing industry and the change of the political system in Hungary in 1989. Hungary became the biggest mini book publisher at that time. Censorship in Hungary as in other soviet countries played a major role in artist's and designer's work. Publishing and printing was strictly controlled. Based on several interviews with a graphic designer, a printer and a bookbinder I have conducted, I came to get an overview about how the system worked in the design and printing field and how the restrictions influenced the outcome of their activity during the socialist era through mini books. Mini book is an experimental book format which works really well contextually in certain political situations. It can be a tool of propaganda with its charming format and scale. Or a secretly produced, inconspicuous object with forbidden content which is against the ruling political system. The production of mini books needed good skills from the designer, printer and the bookbinder, because of the small size. It became a great challenge and playground of experiment with different contents, layouts and materials. With the help of mini books and contemporary articles I have collected, we are able to compare and analyse this medium through these materials published in Hungary during the 70s and 80s.

    Course of Study
    ECAL Type Design

    Tutors
    Wayne Daly, Roland Früh

  • Screen as a contemporary medium

    Molnar, David

    ECAL

    2018

    ECAL, 2018

    Abstract
    Letters are inseparable from matter as their medium. Shapes, letters, words and sentences are only interpretable and understandable as logically defined and universally pre-agreed visual systems of symbols on a visible surface. It can be paper, wood, brick, plastic, LCD screen or simply anything visible; we can say that type is the carrier of spoken language through visible media, and as such, it has various qualities to its existence. During the long history of Western typography, different surfaces were used as carriers of written communication. To keep valuable ideas for eternity, to persuade others, to exchange knowledge and thoughts, to collect data, to advertise products and services, and so on. They were defined by time (how long the information should be kept – for eternity? just for a second? – and how fast they wrote them – were they carved during a week? written in an instant with a pen?), space (how much space do they have or want to fit the text in, will it be read from a far or from close ?), matter (will it be carved on stone? will it be printed on paper? maybe written on an LCD screen?) and the intention: what type will be used for, does it has to be beautiful, or just functional? and so on. These qualities affected nor just the tools used, but the very phenomena of the results of complete typographic systems. I am interested in the method how different surfaces affect type, especially digital screen as it is one of the most used medium today where we see written communication on. How typographers altered letters in the 20th century – during the dawn of screens and digitalisation – to achieve the best qualities, and legibility on rudimentary screens? Does the technique formed letters, or the letters the technique? What are the qualities of screens? How screen as medium affects letterforms? How can we utilise them in typography? What about the relation between books and screen? What are the negative aspects of screen typography? What about the most recent state of virtual and augmented reality, and how can we use them in typography? What about the possible future of type on screen? I would like to study these effects of time, space, matter, and intention, and its affect on screen typography back then and today. What can we postulate of these different examples we can find in western typographic tradition and in contemporary usage?

    Course of Study
    -

    Tutors
    Roland Früh, Wayne Daly

  • Shop Signs

    Girard, Céverine

    ECAL

    2018

    ECAL, 2018

    Shop signs 889 1
    Shop signs 889 2
    Shop signs 889 3

    Abstract
    Since the beginning of civilisation, people have been trading goods. Cities became bigger, trade followed and the need to distinguish yourself from rivals as a merchant appeared. A shop sign is a signage item with the aim to inform, identify, advertise, and often embellish the front of a shop for the public. First created in the ancient Egypt, the materiality of this particular architectural object evolved. From engraved stone and oilcloth to neon tubes and lasered acrylic, they are the witnesses of artistic and industrial revolutions. Their presence in cities shape the urban landscape, arouse curiosity and provoke wonder. Starting from a fascination for neon signage, this thesis aim to analyze the evolution of shop signs, to question their materiality, their physical presence in cities and what they may represent of our current society.

    Course of Study
    ECAL Product Design

    Tutors
    Anniina Koivu, Brynjar Sigurðarson, Margherita Banchi

  • Interdimensional Interview with Ettore Sottsass

    Dorigo, Peblo

    ECAL

    2018

    ECAL, 2018

    Interdimensional interview with ettore sottsass 890 1

    Abstract
    More than others, the design of Sottsass is understandable in intersections, in ambiguities, in the nuances of the different dimensions of creativity and of man. Browsing through his works as in an archipelago of writings, industrial objects, sculptures, paintings, photographs, poems, I wanted to discover the founding energies of the project. Industrial project, art project, life project. I imagine in this interview to meet Ettore in a place out of time and its linearity, making him live again and respond through his writings and his words. taken from his autobiography “Scritto di notte”, from the collection of writings “Scritti” and interviews.

    Course of Study
    ECAL Product Design

    Tutors
    Anniina Koivu, Brynjar Sigurðarson

    File
    9303e385fac1aabfab2a7e0e7395f488.jpg

  • Stereotypography — Stereotypes and cliché in type design

    Pellegrini, Luca

    ECAL

    2018

    ECAL, 2018

    Image 892 1

    Abstract
    Stereotypes in typography at first sight can be explained with the example of “Asian style fonts”, like for instance those typefaces on Chinese restaurant’s signs or printed on products packaging exported out from China. Fonts in which the Latin script seems not enough to express the Asian origin and they need a visual features that somehow refers to the Chinese culture (often the brush stroke) in order to attract Western consumers. A first example of this particular font style in use appeared on a poster from a French bicycle company (Clément bicycle) around the 1906. Obviously the Asian example is not the only one, different script from Latin are stereotypically latinazed in the Sixties, it’s a real cultural appropriation. Speaking about stereotypes in typography there’s also the enormous field of visual appropriation or decorative typography. With visual appropriation I mean the act of translating a specific characteristic of an object into a typographic feature. How a fonts for Emmental (1) cheese looks like? And what about a typeface for a metal chains factory? In the Sixties typography has changed greatly in this sense, thanks to photocomposition and transfer-lettering techniques. The biggest part of type designers and graphic designers, who handle and make use of typography, remained in a state of distressing conformity. According to Jean Larcher (2) the principal reason for this lack of immagination is so-called leggibility. To complete the circle, there’s also the expressive appropriation, that has an important role in this stereotypical overviews of typography. In general terms typography is a meaningful arrangement of letters, expressive typography add a new layer over the existing meaning to accentuate the purpose and the function, it can be made through the design of the font or through a creative arrangement of letters. How a font that has to express something broken should look like? Regarding the expressive typography, the onomatopeia in comic books are considered part of this field because the letters shape must express a sound or a particular noise. I personally see a sort of stereotype system even into the standardization of logotypes. To be more clear, nowadays, brands that started their business straddle XX and XXI century such as Google, Spotify, Airbnb and many more (all technology based, offering a digital solution to differents fields) are changing their logos using an anonymous Grotesk typeface. The same is happening in fashion magazines, all following the same line using a Didot/Bodoni like typeface. These are the four sections that will drives my research (Cultural appropriation, visual appropriation, expressive appropriation and standardization). To conclude, this research is about stereotypes and appropriations in the field of typography, investigating solutions and tecniques used for comunicate something more than a simple message through letters. Often these typefaces are considered as bad examples of type design, therefore where’s the border line between good and bad, professional and amateur in graphic and type design? This topic is connected to DIY design, usually made by amateur graphic designers, that are producing flyers and poster for small festivals and parties. (1) Emmental: Swiss cheese with holes. (2) Jean Larcher: French lettering artist and calligrapher (1947—2015).

    Course of Study
    ECAL Type Design

    Tutors
    Roland Früh / Wayne Daly

    File
    fd01f7e8e550d9e7f3a676200b50c5c2.pdf

  • Text on screen, typography and cinema.

    Quentin, Coulombier

    ECAL

    2018

    ECAL, 2018

    Text on screen typography and cinema 893 1

    Abstract
    As part of my research project in Master Typography I wish, by writing my thesis, examinate and interrogate the relation establish between text and animated images. Typography on a cinematographic piece can take several forms: When the protagonist write or read. The signs on the street they walk through: various advertising, walls full of grafitti on a staged setting. At the entrance of a shop, a notice on the door indicate that it’s close. — A tiny but significant element on which it is conferred a diegetic function that give us a clue about the naration. As a backround entity, it can just be there. Not essential to the understanding of the story. However necessary to the projection of the spectator on a everyday life atmosphere. Textual messages here help to invoke or revoke the notion of reality. The one directly integrate to the images; it is for exemple the case on the opening sequence, where titles, citations or summaries helps in laying the foundations of the storytelling. In fact, as an actor can inflect the sense of the dialogue by simulating emotions; the text to which we add formal attributes (shape, color, location) can inflect the sense of the message itself. Characters and characters work together. Later, typefaces can appear as a temporal indicator, chapter one, chapter two, chapter tree… Otherwise, as a side subtitle that came to increase the value of the oral speech. L’écrit au cinéma crie muettement son importance et dialogue symboliquement avec les voix du film, avec le récit, avec l’espace cinématographique. Il nous rappelle aussi que « graphe » dans « cinématographe » veut dire « écrit », et que le cinéma se situe par rapport au livre en situation d’héritage voire de rivalité. (Michel Chion - L’écrit au cinéma, Armand colin, Paris, 2013) Those exemples are suggestions of what and how can the text be considered as a third element inseparable to images and sound. Text on screen, typography and cinema, their relation. The Fiction, the naration. Visibility and readability. Those are the notion I would like to explore in a both textual and visual essay. A non-exhaustive* proposition punctuated by a multitude of examples. From general information to collected anectode. Reasearching, collecting, interpreting, writing and designing. Designing and writing. *My statement on writing, as I’m designing, is not to provide precise answer from a specific question but more to shed some light on a notion. Suggest and propose something to read and to see.

    Course of Study
    ECAL Type Design

    Tutors
    Wayne Daly, Roland Früh

  • Cross overs

    Solleciti, Vittorio

    ECAL

    2018

    ECAL, 2018

    Abstract
    Crossover - Two domains in tight connection “Designing is about creating emotion, it’s not necessarily rational, I build my products around the idea of individuality, I translate my passion, I create the character I want.” “Freedom is the only style, I never speak about beauty or beautiful products but “good products”, the world “beautiful” doesn’t mean anything, only coherence counts”. Two people, from different fields, speak about their approch to design. The first one is the fashion designer and Gucci creative director Alessandro Michele, the second one is the product designer Philippe Starck. Do these two different figures and respective worlds have something in common? I believe so, nowadays more then before. My intention is to investigate about it and deeply examine the roots of these two worlds in order to figure out how and possibly why the worlds of fashion and product design are breaking any hipotetcial boundaries between their domains. In 1790 in England, the first industrial sewing machine was constructed, and in 1850 was born the first haute couture maison and with it the “first fashion designer”. The Governament School of Design was born in the same period in the same country, in order to elevate the quality of industrial products (not by chance, the main industrial products was textile) and from here was graduating Christopher Dresser, considered “the first industrial designer”. Since their first years these two domains have been connected and there are many examples of crossovers projects that I am analysing, designers who work on both fields and industrial companies involved on both sides. My aim is to compare methodologies, point out when the borders where crossed and ask my self if there is actually a border. Moreover, could a fashion designer bring something new to product design and viceversa? Is there a new typology of designer who works in an envirnoment of no borders able to go across multiple disciplines?

    Course of Study
    ECAL Product Design

    Tutors
    Anniina Koivu, Margherita Banchi, Brynjar Sigurdarson

    File
    8af1e3aa4970829176a6672d028d5d47.pdf

  • Function to Attitude: Ubiquitousness of Logotype in Fashion

    Putri, Maharani

    ECAL

    2018

    ECAL, 2018

    Function to attitude ubiquitousness of logotype in fashion 897 1
    Function to attitude ubiquitousness of logotype in fashion 897 2

    Abstract
    Fashion’s consuming passions are reflected in its typography, from Vogue’s femme serifs to sans in Chanel and the hybrid YSL logo. Most luxury brands are built on the basis of history and heritage, and the selection of a brand name for a luxury goods company increasingly requires careful handling. The origin of this practice can be traced to the French and Italian fashion designers of the 18th, 19th and 20th centuries such as Pascal Guerlain, Thierry Hermes and Guccio Gucci.1 During their time, the conception of branding was less revolutionary and focused more on differentiation through brand name and product design. However the progressing luxury market requires an adaptation of the traditional viewpoint of luxury brands to a modern stance. This has resulted in the tweaking of the logos and the brand names of several luxury companies. How far is heritage and functionality play a role in fashion nowadays? Why does in the past 10 years more than a dozen luxury brands completely abandon this homage to hundreds of years of history by introducing a completely different logotype—some involving contemporary graphic and type designers who has never been involved in the development of these fashion houses. Has the shift of culture where attitude easily trumps functionality impacted the outlook of luxury brands in terms of the use of its logo and its incorporation of typography? In the past few years, luxury brands have turned to logos to account for their prices, and because of the swiftness in which high street is able to reproduce certain pieces, brands feel that it’s crucial to use their logo to honour their uniqueness, especially in current pressure of having streetwear-driven aesthetic. Designer brands had to take part in the game if they wanted to stay on the loop. How could you rationalize your hyper-luxury name when consumers long for banal clothing? Thus the return of logo use in fashion trend. There is an elaborate relationship and interdependence between the clarity and straightforwardness of contemporary design itself with the strikeness of logos. Both type and fashion change with the trends, representing cultural ways of thinking at any given time period. Fundamentally it goes back to these logotypes seen as brands; they play a key role in both the brand and product recognition. How important it is to have an accurate representation of the brand concept to align all its features to show the idea behind the brand in the way that the public can understand? Does the public even need to comprehend the brand image in the era where visual codes, non-transparency and exclusivity are more important than ever. Focusing on one trend in a vast and cyclical history of fashion wouldn’t get us anywhere. Fashion always incorporates the past and the future, it draws inspiration from the past in order to create the desire of the future. To observe how the culture in fashion evolves, I look into several trends and movements in the past decade that involves typography, including the return of logo and labeling obsession that draws back the nostalgia of retro movement in the 1980s and 90s; to the growing reconstruction of logotype from history-induced type to ‘avant-garde’ aesthetic of sans serif grotesque and an observation of collaboration and the co-existence of fashion with other creative fields such as graphic designers, art directors and type designers. As someone who is studying type design, the topic itself is motivated by my fascination on how far the fashion industry uses type as a tool of design, seasonal marketing, ads, and so on. Typography and fashion have always intermingled in a way that it represents the fashion designer and thus the wearer more than anything else—attitude over function.

    Course of Study
    ECAL Type Design

    Tutors
    Roland Früh, Wayne Daly

    File
    da2a4781a7b2fcc01e438289c3f868f6.jpg

  • Sneaker as collective

    Tuo, Lei

    ECAL

    2018

    ECAL, 2018

    Abstract
    Sneaker originally was designed for specific sports and athletes. And athletes have always been at fore front of sneaker culture and that make sense, every development in secret technology has been forced by the needs of athletes who require better performing shoes than the rest of us. With time goes by, sneaker has no longer just a pair of shoes for sports performances but started to blend in our daily life. Majority of people wear sneakers basically in any situations. At the sometime with the increasing popularity of sneaker culture, people called sneaker head start to occur, sneakerhead is a person who collects, trades, or admires sneakers as a hobby. A sneakerhead may also be highly experienced in distinguishing between real and replica sneakers. Sneaker collecting is a hobby often manifested by the use and collection of shoes made for particular sports, particularly basketball and skateboarding.This makes this familiar phenomenon that teenagers lining up in-front of sneaker shop for days just to get an opportunity to purchase. This paper will focus on investigating features that boost up the sneaker collecting culture, analyzing the elements that driven it to such a huge subculture, that also the alternative influence to sneaker industry.

    Course of Study
    ECAL Product Design

    Tutors
    Anniina Koivu

    File
    783371052af0b0195f440e5a641b3d23.pdf

  • Generative design

    Konakovic, Pavle Vanja

    ECAL

    2018

    ECAL, 2018

    Image 909 1

    Abstract
    Technology and computers are changing our way of making and designing products. For years computers have become the main part of our everyday lives. They changed our way of thinking, behaving, helped us with our daily tasks, enabled us to communicate with people around the world and discover a vast number of topics and information. When it comes to designing and creating, computers have been a more passive tool that we used to document and record our ideas. But the development of artificial intelligence, genetic algorithms, deep learned machines and additive manufacturing, set up the playground for generative design. Instead of having a computer that is good for finalizing the design and awful for developing them, nowadays we have computers that using generative design can produce thousands of different design iterations that suit our pre-set design goals.

    Course of Study
    ECAL Product Design

    Tutors
    Anniina Koivu, Brynjar Sigurðarson

    File
    5152a5e7f3e9eb0a7dd3743bba141710.docx

  • Same (sitting) but different (posture)

    Pongpanatnukul, Napat

    ECAL

    2018

    ECAL, 2018

    Same sitting but different posture 910 1

    Abstract
    Sitting Posture is a part of body language, and it is an instinct from the origin of organisms. For the first ancient Egyptians, sitting was a matter of status, varying from throne, to chair and floor. Sitting posture has an impact on much more than just a basic resting position. There are many factors that influence posture such as tradition, rules, culture, etc. Sometimes comfort is the last thing you need. Why do people sit in a different postureeven in the same chair?

    Course of Study
    ECAL Product Design

    Tutors
    Anniina Koivu

    File
    202eb2f2cc8d56593edae4ab3e8f03eb.pdf

  • 3D typography : From 1920 to Present

    Lee, Kyung Jin

    ECAL

    2018

    ECAL, 2018

    3d typography from 1920 to present 912 1
    3d typography from 1920 to present 912 2
    3d typography from 1920 to present 912 3

    Abstract
    Text is no longer limited to flat surface. With the development of digital technology, virtual reality and augmented reality gaining its popularity, 3-dimensional typography is now a big part of the design trend. Since typographic form can change in size, color, and position according to a reader's view in real time, we need a different way of thinking about both typography and the information it conveys. While it isn’t made for readability on flat surface, what is the meaning of 3D typeface for these new world? As the technology improves, treatment for it needs to be changed too. This thesis proposes 3D typography in 2 major aspects. The history of 3D letterform, starting from lettering on monument signage to 70s Letraset inspired typefaces that were mostly drawings on a flat canvas or screen take on a three-dimensional feel, connecting to development of computer technology and practical research of 3D typography with VR technology. Design experiments exploring dynamic treatment of text were generated using the 3D tools.

    Course of Study
    ECAL Type Design

    Tutors
    Roland Früh, Wayne Daly

  • APPLIED INTIMACY

    Maldini, Bianca

    ECAL

    2018

    ECAL, 2018

    Applied intimacy 913 1
    Applied intimacy 913 2
    Applied intimacy 913 3

    Abstract
    APPLIED INTIMACY On connection, its representation and the family We are made by the events which determine our lives and by the people who are part of them. Those we create the deepest relationships with, our family, our lovers, are the main part of our being and our way of relating to the outside and dealing with situations. My research starts from the question of how important personal connections could help the realisation of a photographic project and where is the boundary between the personal reality and its public exhibition (of faces and bodies, feelings and private spaces). In this thesis, I examine the meaning of the concept of intimacy in photographic projects and how the real connection between the photographer and the subjects could be transmitted to the viewer. Through the analysis of various artworks, the thesis focus on real familiar connections transported in the art field which create a different reaction on the viewer. In this case, the concept of “family” is intended as a restricted unit of deep relationships of blood and/or love, where the element of communion is a symbolic or physical union between the parts.

    Course of Study
    ECAL Photography

    Tutors
    Claus Gunti

  • The Grid

    Frieske, Alina

    ECAL

    2018

    ECAL, 2018

    Abstract
    My research is about the ambivalent relationship with the document in photography. How is the photograph used historically in scientific exploration as the medium for objectivity ? Which role is given to the visual as a means of knowledge production ? I will study how artists within different time periods react to forms of scientific images, creating a discourse between science and poetry. In describing various examples of the photograph as a tool to map and classify, I am focusing on the claim for universally legitimate value and the concept of an all encompassing encyclopedia.

    Course of Study
    ECAL Photography

    Tutors
    Claus Gunti

  • Postgenrisme: vers un monde alternatif?

    Carlier, Morgan

    ECAL

    2018

    ECAL, 2018

    Abstract
    Dans un période ou la projection d’une société hétéronormée et cisgenrée s’essouffle, nous pouvons nous interroger sur un futur alternatif ou le concept même du genre binaire homme et femme s’effacerait au profit de la considération de l’individu comme tel, et ce indépendamment de leur différenciations biologiques. Ainsi l’Homme serait défini par ses actions, son comportement, son essence. Le genre serait donc classé comme simple propriété physique au même rang que la couleur des yeux, de la taille, ou de la couleur de peau. Il s’agit ici du concept du Postgenrisme. Il semble que les avancées technologiques et par conséquence, sociales ont été indispensables au développement de ces théories. De même, l’importance des fictions sous différentes formes, cinématographiques, photographiques, littéraires sont également moteurs de ces réflexions. Il s’agira ici d’analyser et d’étudier ces différentes propositions fictives, notamment photographiques et cinématographiques autour du Postgenrisme.

    Course of Study
    ECAL Photography

    Tutors
    Claus Gunti

  • Hidden Semantics: Visual Forms of Written Launguage

    Kim, So Hee

    ECAL

    2018

    ECAL, 2018

    Hidden semantics visual forms of written launguage 916 1
    Hidden semantics visual forms of written launguage 916 2
    Hidden semantics visual forms of written launguage 916 3

    Abstract
    Case studies from Artists and Designers Written forms of language are a part of contemporary art scene, with various approaches they take, worth to be examined in depth (by “contemporary,” I would like to specify the term as times after the 60s). These forms are not merely means to convey meanings in a language but much more as they transform into artworks such as sculpture, painting, personal record, a part of collection, installation and so on. As abstract art does, letters and words can be separated from their referential duties and become liberated through different visual treatments. Different media, sizes, typefaces, contextualizations and presentations of the language change, complicate, supplement and even become independent from what the written words communicate and this aspect is directly comparable to practices in typography. Even a single letter can convey countless nuances and connotations through such variants. These artworks speak without statements. Type designers essentially concern with shapes of letters, pure curves and lines. The way they converse about typefaces and smallest units that decide the overall quality of a typeface might seem absurd to others who are less concerned with such esoteric issues but this passion and obsession are not far from that of artists (excuse the generic stereotype of artists)trying to get the right color in their paintings per se. This will be the one of rudimentary and even outdated analogies one can make between type designers and artists. “Rudimentary and outdated” because medium is no longer limited to paintings and sculptures in making art. In abundance of expanded possibilities of mediums, various artists who deal with languages as their key substance intrinsically ponder on similar subjects regarding languages, especially written forms of those, as designers do. This memoire constantly compares and juxtaposes practices of graphic designers and artists. Contemporary examples will be more discussed here to explore the overlap and contrast between their attitudes on how they use and present written language. To spare the panic of ending up with endless informations on different writing systems and applications of those, Roman alphabets will be the focus, with an exception of asemic writing, which is not specific to a certain language.

    Course of Study
    ECAL Type Design

    Tutors
    Roland Früh, Wayne Daly

    File
    67d10cdd1861d1f1d4c56178d2ff997f.pdf

  • Bi-Script Type design: Hangul and Latin alphabet

    Yoon, Mingoo

    ECAL

    2018

    ECAL, 2018

    Bi scriptual type design hangul and latin alphabet 917 2
    Bi scriptual type design hangul and latin alphabet 917 3

    Abstract
    Since ancient times, humans have explored continuously unknown places and the bridge between them, not where they belong. Exploring between oneself and others, between a country and a country, between planets and planets is human nature, and humans have discovered continuously, invented, and evolved new things. This nature applies without exception to our culture, language, lifestyles, and whole design areas. Understanding the environment in which two different alphabets are grown is necessary for a type designer who designs a typeface, and helps to present new type design methodologies. Generally, to make two different types of alphabets into a single typeface family, formal characteristics are often forced to fit together. To do that, we have to understand each of the complex properties. This study is a report about two different alphabets entirely separate from the past and has lived in a different environment and designing both Hangul(Korean alphabet) and Latin alphabet on a single basis, documenting the work process, discussing various issues, limitations, and experiments within the design.

    Course of Study
    ECAL Type Design

    Tutors
    Roland Früh, Wayne Daly

  • I pictured it like Paris

    Tasula, Maria

    ECAL

    2018

    ECAL, 2018

    I pictured it like paris 918 1
    I pictured it like paris 918 2
    I pictured it like paris 918 3

    Abstract
    I pictured it like Paris: visual representation of family, legacy and class in attention economy The rise of Artificial Intelligence and automation of jobs has led humans to yearn for experiences that are perceived as authentic. In the World Economic Forum meeting held in Davos in January 2018 the founder of Ali Baba, Jack Ma addressed this part of our current: “I think we should teach our kids sports, music, painting, art – to make sure humans are different. Everything we teach should be different from machines. If the machine can do better you need to think about it.” The notion of authenticity prevails in all areas of the lifestyle market from cooking to hand-made objects and appreciation of skills, importance of the origin and the content we desire to consume. We live in the age of attention economy where there is an abundance of information and content creating a fierce competition of our attention. This raises questions I will explore in my thesis: what is authenticity in the context of attention economy? If anyone can be famous, who do we follow? Relevancy in attention economy is achieved through building personal narratives, seen in the success stories of brands that strongly identify to a person. Steve Jobs and Apple. Bill Gates and Microsoft. Kylie Jenner’s lip kit. Tesla and Elon Musk. The Hiltons. The Kardashian-Jenners, Hadids, Beckhams, Smiths. I am interested in why the family unit as an brand and a concept itself has surfaced so prominently in the 2000s and how it is linked to attention economy. I and others are obsessed with ”the children of your favorite celebrities” who instead of land and constituencies receive beauty, connections and fame as a birthright. I use Paris Hilton as an case, positioning her as an prototype of the phenomena, a blueprint for the various reality TV family brands after her that have crafted an controlled image in their own terms. In 2000, Vanity Fair featured an interview in the September issue titled Hip-Hop Debs with the Hilton hotel heiresses Nicky and Paris Hilton, 16 and 19 respectively. The interview was illustrated with images shot by David LaChapelle where the sisters are clad in skimpy clothes, standing next to a vintage Bentley with motel neon signs in the background. In one image, later sold as Cibachrome print at an art auction in 2017 with a title Paris Hilton: Grandma Hilton’s House, Paris Hilton is positioned as a rebellious character. She is wearing a miniskirt, aviator sunglasses and a top made entirely of fishnet. In one hand, she holds a cigarette. The other hand is raised to a middle finger. She is set, in what could be derived from the title, her grandma’s house in a room of grandeur with several antique seating areas, draped curtains and a large white carpet. Behind her on the carpet lies a discarded white morning jacket, a nod to Marilyn Monroe-like character of a femme fatale and seductress. In the interview, Paris Hilton is followed around by a film crew making a documentary TV show with a working title Guest List Only. She is quoted planning a cosmetics line together with her family: “We’re doing a cosmetics line together -- We’re calling it Paris and Nicky. My mom is really handling all that.” Almost two decades later, Paris Hilton has built a perfume business with an estimated worth of two billion dollars with over 20 fragrances, most featuring a campaign of herself. This is now a familiar pattern that doesn’t seem to have an end date. In my thesis I will explore how visual representation of family, legacy and class is intertwined with attention economy.

    Course of Study
    ECAL Photography

    Tutors
    Claus Gunti

    File
    9b398824d220f52af5a297adfcf8941d.jpg

  • Medical Photography

    Goo, Gi Jeong

    ECAL

    2018

    ECAL, 2018

    Medical fear 921 1
    Medical fear 921 2
    Medical fear 921 3

    Abstract
    Images can not physically harm human beings. However, it stimulates and concentrates the sense we feel. In medicine, the inside of the body was photographed with the techniques of ultrasound, x-rays, etc. to find the cause of the human body's pain, and the body abnormality was marked by the specific technique. This allows doctors to identify the cause of the patient 's suffering, and is helping to treat the human body in comparison to normal - state photographs. Medical cameras are 'measurement tools'. It is a technique that is designed not to contain what is seen by the eye, but to observe what can not be seen by the eye. (The text of the anatomical text was met with limited success in the early years of photography. tonal variation made photographs Difficulty to interpret. This may have been due to the spectral sensitivity of early materials to blue, violet and ultra-violet light. The purpose is to emphasize the difficult parts to observe,

    Course of Study
    ECAL Photography

    Tutors
    Claus.Gunti

  • Corn, the symbol of a nation

    Leal, Fernanda

    ECAL

    2018

    ECAL, 2018

    Abstract
    I was born and raised in Mexico City. If you have ever been there or anywhere in Mexico, you probably have discovered the traditional food and realised that the heart and soul of it is corn. You can find it in soups, snacks, main courses and even desserts. Corn has been part of the Mexican base diet since pre-Hispanic times and its cultivation, diversity, applications and shape have evolved along with society. With this memoire I want to take you on a historical journey to understand the importance for my country and how it managed to become one of the most important cereals, along with wheat and rice, worldwide.

    Course of Study
    ECAL Product Design

    Tutors
    Anniina Koivu, Brynjar Sigurðarson

  • You wouldn't have known that Pleats were there!

    Yoon, Ilseop

    ECAL

    2018

    ECAL, 2018

    You wouldn t have known that pleats were there 929 3
    You wouldn t have known that pleats were there 929 2
    You wouldn t have known that pleats were there 929 4

    Abstract
    How many objects with a pleated pattern can you think of? Pleats are commonly known as a folded pattern on clothing. But because of its strong and beautiful structure, pleated patterns can be observed not only in fashion but also in various fields. If you observe your surroundings closely, you can notice that there are dozens of pleated elements; from the leaves of indoor plants, clothings, human body, suitcase, even to the roofs and walls of the building that we live in. As you notice, pleats are closely related to our lives in various scales. However, we normally don’t pay attention to the purpose and usage of the pleats. The memoir will start with the overview of the pleats; what it is, how it’s used especially in nature. Along the way, the pleats will be classified with different types such as nature, fashion, product, architecture, and so on with examples. The research will provide new perspectives on the pleated pattern and inspire the reader to brainstorm new ideas with consideration of the structural and visual patterns.

    Course of Study
    ECAL Product Design

    Tutors
    Anniina Koivu, Brynjar Sigurðarson

    File
    e3ad4b9f9de4d802eb26eebc3e7a981c.pdf

  • A-, SYMMETRY

    Gräber, Fritz

    ECAL

    2018

    ECAL, 2018

    Image 935 2
    Image 935 3
    A symmetry 935 4

    Abstract
    Living in a very symmetric society and its created world the need of something different becomes stronger and stronger. Starting with the statement that asymmetric objects are visually more outstanding and iconic, there is first of all a never ending world of symmetries to explore. In a chronological order the topic is studied in the same broad way as it is by itself. From biology and the human perception over the antiquity to Andrea Palladio this research has its focus on the modernism with the Bauhaus period and the “father of modernism” Alvar Aalto up to the specific field of product design and our current time. Symmetry is something nature given in order to manage growth and movement processes. The human being is constantly looking for lines and grids as well as right angles to get a fast orientation. And by comparing plants and animals to architecture and design the is a very interesting relation to explore.

    Course of Study
    ECAL Product Design

    Tutors
    Anniina Koivu, Brynjar Sigurðarson

    File
    c2ffe656d51bb6ce8e3098927620652a.pdf

  • Total Design

    Verity, William

    ECAL

    2018

    ECAL, 2018

    Abstract
    Investigation into the history of ‘total design’ from the Bauhaus to today.

    Course of Study
    ECAL Product Design

    Tutors
    Anniina Koivu

  • Figures Of Speech - A manual for details in product design

    Breuer, Johannes

    ECAL

    2018

    ECAL, 2018

    Figures of speech a manual for details in product design 938 1
    Figures of speech a manual for details in product design 938 2
    Figures of speech a manual for details in product design 938 3

    Abstract
    "Figures of Speech - A manual for details in product design and ways to read them. Abstract of the Preface Products speak. They are able to do it without talking, moving or actively doing anything which sets them apart from the digital world of software and interfaces. But still they can transmit something - just by the way they have been designed. They have their own analog, visual language. Designing products that have the power to communicate something useful and positive to whoever is using them is the goal that makes this profession so charmingly challenging for me. But what can products tell us through their design? In many cases they can inform us what we can use them for and how to do it, what they are made of and how they have been produced, where they come from, wether they are expensive or cheap, wether they are new or old, hot or cold, rough or smooth, heavy or light etc. Products communicate something through the way the light reflects on their surfaces, through transparency and opaqueness, through signage and the use of color but most importantly : through their shape and general appearance. Even the slightest, most subtle change in the visual components of a product can completely flip the way we perceive it and what we might associate with it on a meta-level. Objects can also express many seemingly abstract things at the same time which in total make us like or resent them. I would like to define certain visual ingredients that can influence our perception as well as our opinion of a product. Why do certain objects make us want to touch them; lift them up, feel their surfaces and shapes with our hands? Is it solely something to indicate how they should be used or is there something more to it? There are certain visual details that immediately trigger feelings of e.g. stability or high value and others that make the user assume completely the opposite. Interesting to look at is wether all of these assumptions and associations are entirely subjective and which scientific findings could be applied to support these vague observations. For instance I strongly believe that there is a link between e.g. the way we articulate - so write and speak - and the way products are designed. As people have investigated before in the fields of photography, advertising and graphic design I would like to unfold certain parallels between rhetoric principles of written or spoken language and visual rhetoric principles of product design. But this is only one way of many of trying to grasp the visual details of products and trying to decode their intention as well as their perception. Certainly, the field of semantics and semiotics in product design is no blank page and has been widely investigated. But this has often been done from a rather strictly scientific point of view. Since I am not a psychologist or art-historian, nor a curator, critic or editor but a Designer what I wanted to achieve with my work is to firstly analyze my own personal observations, feelings, associations and images related to the appearance of products, then compile them, find categories, find examples, describe what they communicate through their appearance and try to back my assumptions up with cold hard facts if I can. But not everything that I show in this book will be scientifically proven or trying to be valid for everyone. I divide my observations in five different chapters, which will each have multiple sub-categories within and several product-examples with pictures to make it understandable in a visual way: I) INDICATORS (fig. 1) II) BIRTHMARKS (fig. 2) III) METAPHORS & SYMBOLS (fig. 3) IV) EXPRESSION (fig. 4) V) SPACE FOR INTERPRETATION (fig. 5) The different chapters and categories also share connections and grey areas in between. One example can show details that are exhibiting observations for multiple chapters or categories. The overall goal of this book is to summarize and categorize visual details in the details of objects while trying to decode what they communicate, how and why. All of this written from my personal product designers point of view. This can hopefully serve as an interesting impulse and as a source for inspiration for seeing, reading, questioning, understanding and maybe eventually even making shapes."

    Course of Study
    ECAL Product Design

    Tutors
    Anniina Koivu, Brynjar Sigurðarson

    File
    2aa9338bfd7757f9847e0a62754333dc.pdf

  • Ready-made / the art of observation and selection

    Görlitz, Matias

    ECAL

    2018

    ECAL, 2018

    Ready made the art of observation and selection 939 1

    Abstract
    Objects that surround us are evaluated mainly by the context in which they are located. Lack of context or its inappropriate use can cause negative or incomprehensible emotions for the recipient. Misunderstanding and shock caused in this way in 1913 Marcel Duchamp and his new initiated term called “Ready-made”. Finished objects, made by a machine or a man, taken out of their natural surroundings and embedded into a new context, aroused and still arouse much controversy. The research into “Ready-made”, will show not only the artistic side of the term but mainly an interesting transition to the design world. It will present “Ready-mades” as a basic tool for many designers that I discovered and will show all the new branches of it. Step by step I will move away from the standard image of “Ready-made” and will show new examples that at the first glance doesn't look like a “Ready-made” but if we look closer, we will realise that it is the same action of picking an exciting object that we normally know from Marcel Duchamp.

    Course of Study
    ECAL Product Design

    Tutors
    Anniina Koivu, Brynjar Sigurdarson

    File
    aea68844b2b4be954d1625294ec727e0.jpg

  • Digital Amnesia

    Rachez, Jimmy

    ECAL

    2018

    ECAL, 2018

    Digital amnesia 963 1

    Abstract
    My research project is about traumatic event in this era of the ubiquity of images of violence that informs us in live what is happening on earth. In this total overwhelming flow of informations that modified constantly our perceptions of our personal environnement. This loss of informations has create a world in uncertainty and has modified the definition of truth and our sensitivity of it. By looking at recent practices that respond to a violent traumatic event, my aim, is to understand how they answer to a traumatic event and in which form they are shown. How those subjects are translated by the artists ? In which form ? Why those subjects needs to be shown ?What needs to be said ? Is there limits of what need to be say ? And create a tool that will help me to understand my own story and define my own practice.

    Course of Study
    ECAL Photography

    Tutors
    Claus Gunti

    File
    70b5947045f6ca516ed77c58afac55a1.jpg

  • White Wood

    Zirkelbach, Meri

    HSLU D&K

    2018

    HSLU D&K, 2018

    Abstract
    Die theoretische Arbeit umfasst die Ergebnisse der Zusammenarbeit im Rahmen der praktischen Masterarbeit „White Wood“ mit der ETH/Empa Zürich. Mithilfe von Vergleichen zu anderen Projekten, in welchen Designer mit Wissenschaftlern zusammengearbeitet haben, wurde der Kooperationsbeitrag des Designs auf ähnliche Muster und Unterschiede im Prozess analysiert und reflektiert. Voraussetzungen der speziellen Kompetenzen der jeweiligen Fachgebiete wurden definiert und Methoden erarbeitet, welche die Interaktion und dadurch die Kommunikation im Team verbessern können. Daraus resultierte ein Vorschlag für eine Roadmap beziehungsweise die Herangehensweise einer Zusammenarbeit für weitere zukünftige interdisziplinäre Projekte. Designer und Wissenschaftler unterscheiden sich in ihren Fachgebieten und Arbeitsweisen. Bei einer Zusammenarbeit treffen daher oftmals ungleiche Welten aufeinander und es erfordert Zeit, Ressourcen, die Entwicklung einer gemeinsamen Sprache und die Bereitschaft für gegenseitiges Verständnis auf der persönlichen Ebene, um eine vertrauensvolle Arbeitsbeziehung aufzubauen. Wenn einmal diese Herausforderungen überwunden sind, kann eine Zusammenarbeit für beide Seiten sehr befruchtend sein. Durch eine Zusammenarbeit kann wissenschaftliche Forschung während dem Projektprozess in eine neue vorher unbekannte Richtung gesteuert werden. Ebenso erweitert der Designer sein traditionelles Berufsbild al reiner Gestalter ästhetischer Produkte und erlangt ein vertieftes Wissen über unterschiedliche Gebiete. Zuerst müssen aber die Vorteile und der Beitrag von Design zu Beginn einer Technologieentwicklung definiert werden.

    Course of Study
    HSLU Master Design

    Tutors
    Dr. Jan Eckert, Klaus Marek

  • Poetic Materials

    Baumann, Frederik

    HSLU D&K

    2018

    HSLU D&K, 2018

    Abstract
    Poetic qualities offer the possibility to enhance the user experience. The human well-being and trust in artificial intelligence can be increased through the atmospheric effects of poetic qualities. In my thesis project, I combine poetic qualities and the approach of anthropomorphism and aliveness to create new tangible and haptically experienceable interfaces. While doing so, I focus mainly on the possibilities, how those interface can be integrated in a highly aesthetical and very emotional and sensual way in surfaces. In my project, I work on a wide variety on material solutions, reaching from more conventional tangible interfaces by using icons that signalize affordances to very advanced and provocative solutions of kinetic materials that could work as a responsive body of artificial intelligence. The context for my material experiments are tomorrow's interiors of autonomous cars.

    Course of Study
    HSLU Master Design

    Tutors
    Zellweger & Ossevoort

  • Knowledge Exchange in Education

    Marzo, Carla

    HSLU D&K

    2018

    HSLU D&K, 2018

    Abstract
    In recent years, the value of knowledge has increased within organizations, being widely regarded as a business imperative for driving competitive advantage. When knowledge is shared with and transferred to others, it increases its value. rough the exchange of knowledge, companies can create big pro t and the grounds and arguments for an ex- change leave no doubt that knowledge exchange leads to success. When exchanging knowledge, digitalisation plays an important role as it allows to connect individuals throughout the world. Nevertheless, while the signi cance of knowledge exchange in the private sector is widely acknowledged, its signi cance for the context of primary school education remains unexplored. is Master thesis aims at lling this research gap, dealing with knowledge, its management, and its exchange in case of schools. e goal of the thesis is to discover which factors a ect knowledge exchange, and more spe- ci cally, de ne which of those can have a direct in uence on Swiss primary teachers exchanging knowledge beyond their own school. For this purpose, I theoretically treat the terms social capital, knowledge, and knowledge management. In a further step, the focus will be particularly on knowledge exchange, its process, and the necessary tools where the exchange of knowledge takes place, both digital and analog. At this point digitalisation becomes important as particularly digital tools improve and ease the inter- action, collaboration and exchange of knowledge among individuals and groups. Based on this, a model of knowledge exchange between individuals in organizations is formu- lated, as well as an assessment tool for measuring the attributes that a knowledge ex- change tool needs to have. e teachers’ opinion and current situation regarding knowl- edge exchange is examined on the basis of a quantitative empirical survey and subsequently discussed. Relying on this, two case studies are closely analysed to see how does knowledge exchange currently happen among teachers in Switzerland. e ndings are useful to de ne which speci c factors play a role in the exchange of knowledge among Swiss primary education and need to be taken into account to afterwards build up a service where knowledge exchange can be carried out in a successful and e cient way.

    Course of Study
    HSLU Master Design

    Tutors
    Jan Eckert & Klaus Marek

  • Voyeurisme Acoustique

    Nassif, Jessica-Maria

    HEAD

    2018

    HEAD, 2018

    Abstract
    Snowden scandal exploded in 2013. We’re listened to, observed and analysed. But when did mass surveillance really begin? What artistic form did it take? Acoustic Voyeurism retrace the history of sound surveillance and it spaces to understand how they were reactivated by the americain artists Bruce Nauman and Dan Graham in some of their pieces from the end of the 1960’s until the mid 1970’s. By refecting what is happening at the time in the society within the art galery, their pieces open the eye on conditioning spaces and question self-image, using technological surveillance audiovideo tools. Acoustic Voyeurism proposes a facet of sound surveillance developed in the art gallery during the Cold War.

    Course of Study
    head_espaces_communication

    Tutors
    Damien Delille

  • Good Vibrations. From Repression to Stimulation

    Bosch Vidal, Helena

    HEAD

    2018

    HEAD, 2018

    Abstract
    From its creation in the late nineteenth century, the vibratory object has taken different signification, discourses, and uses, in accordance with the respective power structures of each time. Vibration objects were designed as tools to repress bodies and sexualities from a medical or commercial position. How can one same object and technology serve opposite purposes and follow contrary discourses? The sexual oppression through the usage of vibratory objects indirectly implies the appropriation and redesign of those tools by the repressed bodies for purpose of their own sexual pleasure. Masturbation and Vibration are unavoidably linked in their dynamic principle. Good Vibrations analyzes oppressive uses of the vibrator object in relation to female body. This study takes part in the late nineteenth century to the 1960’s. Where it dissects the emancipative sexual attempts by women, as acts of resistance.

    Course of Study
    head_espaces_communication

    Tutors
    Damien Delille

  • Hacking the Surface

    Granado, Beatriz

    HEAD

    2018

    HEAD, 2018

    Abstract
    Following Rick Poynor’s question, where lays the graphic designer that believes that design should be more about than endorsing the current state of reality?(1) Generally accepted as graphic designers, Jan van Toorn and Metahaven have worked in the field but always challenging it’s conventionally accepted role, especially as a mere information channel. Hacking the Surface goes through selected strategies used by the designers to explore the possibilities and outcomes of graphic design as a subversive apparatus. It looks into these strategies to understand how design can subvert the status-quo by also complying with systems and working from within established surfaces. (1) Poynor, R. and Van Toorn, J. (2008) Jan van Toorn: Critical Practice. Rotterdam: 010 Publishers. p.79

    Course of Study
    head_espaces_communication

    Tutors
    Sonia de Puineuf

  • Les espaces voilés

    Bagheri, Fatemeh

    HEAD

    2018

    HEAD, 2018

    Abstract
    "The veiled spaces" uncovers a narrative from Iran during the 1930’s where women of this generation sought who regain control of existing spaces in pursuit of new ways to traverse towns and cities. This re-appropriation is a direct consequence and reaction from the "Kashf Hijab" law which referred to the abolition of veiling, set up by the Reza Shah during the Pahlavi era (1925-1979). Some women in defiance who selected to continue veiling developed innovative and new strategies to bypass the new legislation and prosecution including the use of alternative spaces and pathways. The House of Abbassian represents an additional point of interest as its unique architecture offered women the possibility to traverse Kashan discreetly while veiled. A network of largely undiscovered/mapped passages to this day, provided women of Kashan with a city of many levels and increased autonomy. A simple question remains however, what was the original purpose of these passages? The re-appropriation and redefinition of spaces constructed by men within a largely patriarchal system, by Iranian women represents a truly unique and powerful outcome. What methods did women of Kashan use to bypass imposed restraints on their freedom of movement while maintaining their freedom of expression? This paper will outline a comprehensive analysis of these methods and the significance of the women’s ingenuity.

    Course of Study
    head_espaces_communication

    Tutors
    Sébastien Quéquet

  • Cold Rush

    Pasquet, Jeanne

    HEAD

    2018

    HEAD, 2018

    Abstract
    Frozen in ice, bodies are intact, leading to the beginning of a new dream for humanity : immortality. The scientific and technical progress of the twentieth century makes this hope possible when, in the 1960s, the scientist Robert Ettinger, inspired by the first sci-fi narratives of American pulps, decides to devote his life to the ambitious project of overcoming death by cold. Convinced that the forthcoming medicine would be able to resurrect frozen bodies, he develops the cryogenics process. Heir of that belief, following the idea of immortality, the transhumanist ideology claimed by companies such as Google and it’s techno-prophet Raymond Kurzweil, extends this quest. One of the goals is to store data from the brains of humanity in huge data centers in order to achieve digital immortality. Greedy on electricity and due to all of the process related to it, these centers end up producing too much heat. But servers need cold to operate, always cold. While the GAFAM are heading to the North Pole to reach the white gold, the planet is warming because of human activity and industrial pollution. The Cold Rush is launched.

    Course of Study
    head_espaces_communication

    Tutors
    Alexandra Midal

  • À la frontière du réel: les tours illuminées au Etats-Unis

    Petrov, Lilia

    HEAD

    2018

    HEAD, 2018

    A la frontiere du reel les tours illuminees aux etats unis 868 1

    Abstract
    Heterotopias is: "subtle and clever enough to dispel reality with the sole force of illusions", Michel Foucault told us in his lecture entitled Heterotopias, in 1966. Can heterotopia reveal and dissociate realities in precise spaces, that are illuminated American towers ? Are heterotopies a way to better understand American architectural concepts? There are different ways of locating heterotopias. In this work, we will focus on the notion of the illuminated tower as a symbol of the United States to better understand the notions of heterotopia according to Michel Foucault and simulacra according to Jean Baudrillard. We will see how heterotopy becomes an accomplice of the simulacrum: between them, they allow to create a reality distorted by our imagination. We can transform the imagination into reality through devices like the illuminated towers of Luna Park in Coney Island, Las Vegas and its fake Eiffel Tower, as well as Time Square with its screens of illusions. The tower is both a physical element that has a specific function in the architectural landscape and, at the same time, a metaphor for American culture. The Ground Zero site will unveil its symbolic function through the twin towers of the World Trade Center. What connection does light play in a heterotopic space as strong as a memorial?

    Course of Study
    head_espaces_communication

    Tutors
    Sébastien Quéquet

    File
    ae4ea2947a8805a31a65e1774ea6056b.tif

  • Variable fonts, between possibility and necessity

    Héritier, David

    HEAD

    2018

    HEAD, 2018

    Abstract
    Variable fonts have been out for a few years now, but they still raise a lot of questions in international typographic conferences. Despite the revolutionary aspect the OpenType development group claims they have as a web technology, some designers are dubious of their real advantages and question the possible change they can really bring. A lot of experiments have occurred since the 90ies and the lessons taught by Multiple Master and QuickDraw GX seem to have been learned. The moment appears to be right for the variable fonts to develop and change the habits of type creators, graphic designers and web developers. What will be theses changes and how will designers influence them and adapt to them?

    Course of Study
    HEAD Master Media Design

    Tutors
    Daniel Sciboz

  • PEE-PEE-ISTS

    Chien, Chun-Hua

    HEAD

    2018

    HEAD, 2018

    Abstract
    Title: PEE-PEE-ISTS Subtitltle: Pee users, public toilets and gender emancipation in contemporary Taiwan This thesis deals with the question of gender in public spaces, speci cally the public lavatory in the context of Taiwan; assumption about sexuality, reproduction, and privacy that govern the life of each citizen under the name of modernization. This thesis deals with the question of gender in public spaces, speci cally the public lavatory in the context of Taiwan; assumption about sexuality, reproduction, and privacy that govern the life of each citizen under the name of modernization. The author examines three groups of arguments based on public toilet design and its related socio-political movement/participation in Taiwan, arguing that the public toilets are the space of gender awareness in a society.

    Course of Study
    head_espaces_communication

    Tutors
    Damien Delille

  • Ziggy Stardust

    Deckers, Sofie

    HEAD

    2018

    HEAD, 2018

    Ziggy stardust 875 1
    Ziggy stardust 875 3
    Ziggy stardust 875 4

    Abstract
    (How David Bowie reached the stars, sprinkled stardust over his audience and was defeated by his own fame) Ziggy Stardust is the alter ego of the British musician David Bowie. The album The Rise and Fall of Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders from Mars which came out in 1972 and the Ziggy Stardust World Tour from January 1972 to July 1973, tell the story of Ziggy Stardust, a rockstar messiah from outer space on a mission to save Planet Earth. For more than one year, David Bowie became the protagonist of his own imaginary scenario in real life. By contextualising David Bowie's alter ego in the shifting society of post-war London and comparing his approach of observing and transforming society with the approaches used by architects and designers of his time, this essay attempts to investigate how David Bowie's unique approach could inspire contemporary designers.

    Course of Study
    head_espaces_communication

    Tutors
    Sonia de Puineuf

    File
    c529ba3e2654240e1a81caa64e181a29.pdf

  • Designer in the digital era

    Chappuis, Arnaud

    HEAD

    2018

    HEAD, 2018

    Image 881 1
    Image 881 3

    Abstract
    Today, one of the possibilities that presents itself to the designer to concretize his own projects consists in the use of tools formerly too complex and expensive, like the 3D printer or the machining tool with numerical control (CNC). These tools become more accessible (some patents move into the public domain) because they are developed and shared by many communities on the Internet (do-it-yourself / DIY, culture maker, FabLabs, open source, open design ...). These communities, which advocate the sharing of culture and knowledge, question the limits of copyright (Creative Commons, Copyleft, free-culture movement). If this trend enthuses some, who see there a toolbox and new opportunities of creation, it worries others for whom it announces «the death of the designer». Are we in a new era that would change paradigms in design ? What impact do these changes have on the designer’s practice ? Can we think of industrial design at the individual level in the digital era ?

    Course of Study
    head_espaces_communication

    Tutors
    Sonia de Puineuf

    File
    3ccd8cdd244947e6afe2ed02e4a640c1.pdf

  • Prestiges furniture

    Debernardi Burnand, Léa

    HEAD

    2018

    HEAD, 2018

    Prestiges furniture 882 1
    Prestiges furniture 882 2
    Prestiges furniture 882 3

    Abstract
    Prestiges furniture Retractable furniture design and prestige concept In this work, we are interested in retractable furniture, that is to say furniture that can be unexpectedly concealed somewhere by manipulating skillfully. The magical effect of their unexpected transformation leads us to question their relationship with the prestiges, illusions created by spells. These prestiges have qualities of design and manufacturing touted by advertising. They sign membership to a certain rank, a prestigious rank. Is prestige, as a fame, above all a matter of prestiges, of illusions? Taking as a plot of our subject the unfolding of a magic show, we will try to unravel the mystery of prestiges and reveal the secret of prestige ... Le mobilier de prestiges Design de meubles escamotables et notion de prestige Dans ce travail, nous nous intéressons aux meubles escamotables, c’est-à-dire aux meubles que l’on peut inopinément dissimuler quelque part en les manipulant habilement. L’effet magique de leur transformation inattendue nous amène à questionner leur rapport avec les prestiges, illusions créées par les sortilèges. Ces prestiges possèdent des qualités de conception et de fabrication vantées par la publicité. Elles signent l’appartenance à un certain rang, un rang prestigieux. Le prestige, en tant que renommée, n’est-il pas avant tout une affaire de prestiges, d’illusions ? En prenant pour trame de notre propos le déroulé d’un spectacle de magie, nous essayerons de percer le mystère des prestiges et de dévoiler le secret du prestige…

    Course of Study
    head_espaces_communication

    Tutors
    Sonia de Puineuf

    File
    39de23b098ab5323003b1ccfc90c96e8.pdf

  • Is the women's watches industry about to live a revolution?

    Gigon, Iris

    HEAD

    2018

    HEAD, 2018

    Is the women s watches industry about to live a revolution 894 1

    Abstract
    The field of this theoretical master's degree research concerns the world of women's watches. From the past to the present, I have tried to highlight the reasons why women's watches are today what they are. They still retain attributes such as diamonds, mother-of-pearl, small diameters and quartz movements that stem from the past of women’s watches which is closely linked to the history of jewelery. However, men's watches have freed themselves from this jeweler's past during the years of war to embrace a vision focused on functionality. But today women do not need functional tools? Or must they keep going on with « jewellry watches » ? Thus, following this trend of emancipation of women, it is possible that we observe in the next decade a small revolution of the plethoric sector of the women’s watches. Le sujet de cette recherche théorique de master concerne l’univers de la montre pour femme. Du passé au présent, j’ai tenté de mettre en avant les raisons pour lesquelles les montres pour femme sont aujourd’hui ce qu’elles sont. Elles conservent encore des attributs tels que diamants, nacre, petits diamètres et mouvements quartz qui découlent de l’histoire de la montre pour femme qui s’avère étroitement liée à l’histoire de la joaillerie. Cependant, les montres masculines se sont affranchies de ce passé joaillier durant les années de guerres pour embrasser une vision axée sur la fonctionnalité. Or de nos jours, les femmes n’ont-elles pas besoin d’outils fonctionnels ou doivent-elles se contenter de « montres-bijoux ». Ainsi, en suivant cette tendance d’émancipation de la femme, il est possible que nous observions dans la prochaine décennie une petite révolution du secteur pléthorique de la montre féminine.

    Course of Study
    head_design_mode

    Tutors
    Stéphane Gachet

    File
    554c4bd3c8bed475cd7e72d5d6dc557c.pdf

  • AGEDOR

    Python, Kim

    HEAD

    2018

    HEAD, 2018

    Agedor 901 1

    Abstract
    At a time when the social engagement of designers is rising, what impact can a watch designer have on elderly people’s life quality? After two difficult years, traditional watchmaking is progressively recovering but remains fragile. Aware of the increasing rate of the elderly population in our society, the watchmaking industry has not yet, or only slightly, paid attention to this pressing issue. Watchmakers often overlook the specific needs of elders, such as: practicality, legibility and aestheticism. Elderly people aspire to traditional and luxurious timepieces. High-class watchmaking has not yet responded to the expectations and needs of the elders, nonetheless other entities within this sector have emerged in these last years, offering “assistance watches”. These companies did not emerge from the watchmaking industry directly, but rather from a universe of new technologies and personal care. These assistance watches respond to the seniors’ expectations, especially regarding security and functionality. However, they unfortunately neglect the beauty of the object. Throughout this project, my aim is to merge these two worlds together in order to create a watch that responds to these specific conditions. In my opinion, watch design could bring much support to elderly people in their daily life. I strongly believe that such product could offer some wellbeing at different levels: physically, aesthetically and psychologically. With regard to watchmaking improvements, three hypotheses have guided my research: technological effort, practical effort and aesthetical effort. Nowadays it is crucial to reconstruct the structures linked to the security of our elders. The challenge consists in including older people in our communities in order to avoid further marginalization. À l’heure où l’engagement social des designers se multiplie, quel rôle le design horloger peut-il avoir sur la qualité de vie de nos aînés ? Après avoir connu deux années difficiles, l’horlogerie traditionnelle a repris progressivement des forces, toutefois, elle reste fragile. Bien consciente de l’augmentation de la population de personnes âgées dans notre société, l’horlogerie ne s’est pas encore, ou très peu intéressée à celles-ci. L’horlogerie ne prend pas en compte les besoins des seniors tels que : la praticité, la lisibilité et l’esthétisme. Les aînés aspirent à un garde-temps à la fois traditionnel et luxueux. Si l’horlogerie de luxe ne s’est pas appropriée les attentes des aînées, d’autres entités du secteur ont émergé depuis quelques années, proposant des « montres d’assistances». Ces entreprises ne sont pas issues de l’horlogerie, mais plutôt de l’univers des nouvelles technologies et des soins à la personne. Ces montres d’assistances répondent à certaines attentes des personnes âgées : celles qui concernent les aspects sécuritaires et fonctionnels. Toutefois, elles oublient la beauté de l’objet. Mon but est de mélanger ces deux mondes, afin de créer une montre adaptée. Selon moi, le design horloger pourrait apporter du soutien aux personnes âgées dans leurs vies quotidiennes. Je pense qu’un produit horloger pourrait leur donner du bien-être à plusieurs niveaux : que ce soit physique, esthétique et psychologique. Trois hypothèses, en vue de l’amélioration des montres, ont guidé mes recherches : l’effort technologique, l’effort pratique et l’effort esthétique. De nos jours, il est primordial de reconstruire les structures liées à la sécurité des personnes d’âges mûrs. Le challenge est d’inclure les personnes âgées dans la communauté et qu’elles ne soient pas mises en marge de la société.

    Course of Study
    head_design_mode

    Tutors
    Marion Braizaz

    File
    e61ac4378061b6ca7faaaf61e041de67.pdf

  • Online Music Communities

    Talou, Romain

    HEAD

    2018

    HEAD, 2018

    Abstract
    This research discuses how music aficionados have continually hijacked models of music broadcasting and distribution. From the major labels of yesteryear to today’s streaming giants. In this context, I observe how enthusiasts within online communities reapprorpiate the experience of discovering and sharing music. Does this new role of amateur critic and curator make sense with regards to the tradition of experts in this domain? How do amateurs deal with the failure of algorithmic curation on streaming platforms? Can these communities blaze a trail for the mainstream online music listening experience?

    Course of Study
    HEAD Master Media Design

    Tutors
    Joël Vacheron

  • Unresolved

    Akil, Ghofran

    HEAD

    2018

    HEAD, 2018

    Abstract
    Enforced disappearances are a widespread phenomenon that has taken place in several countries around the world and is still ongoing in countries like Syria and Yemen. Their families suffer from severe psychological damage due to lack of comprehension and proper support. Psychologists have continued to miss-diagnose them with Freud’s Melancholia until Pauline Boss has coined the term Ambiguous Loss, which best describes the families’ psychological state. In our paper, we define and introduce the two types of Ambiguous Loss, while proving that the families fall into both types depending on the situation. We then move on to exploring the economical, social and legal burdens that follow the families, continuing to analyse how the absence of rituals, their spirituality and perspective on life affect their psychology. Next, we introduce Boss’s six guidelines for the families to move forward towards resilience. At this point, we connect these guidelines with previously done projects on the subject, whether by family members, international and national organisations, or even artists interested in the subject. While we believe that the former projects are interesting, we argue that they are still shy in their means of expression. This is when we introduce the work of María Alejandra Ordoñez, Retratos no Hablados, Gabriel Posada and Yorlady Ruiz, Magdalenas por el Cauca, and eventually Grupo de Teatro el Tente, Anunciando la Ausencia, claiming that they tackle the subject beautifully, while maintaining deep therapeutic concepts that consciously or unconsciously relate to Boss’s guidelines.

    Course of Study
    HEAD Master Media Design

    Tutors
    Daniel Pinkas

  • Love watchmaking humanitarian causes

    Aebi, Kevin

    HEAD

    2018

    HEAD, 2018

    Image 906 1

    Abstract
    OUR UNIVERSE, OUR VALUES, OUR TIME: From day to day, the sacred bonds of marriage that unite watchmaking and global problems are growing stronger. From the smallest worker passionate about crafts to the largest group specialized in the luxury industry, everyone wants to give of their heart to make the best possible impact on their ecological and environmental footprint. And thus preserve our planet as well as possible, while offering it a beautiful perspective for the future. However, what does the future of our beloved Earth look like? Will we live in dark times? Are we going to destroy everything, even the soil that allows us to live and feed ourselves? As for me, the attraction for these ecological values gradually came to me, when I decided to open myself to the world around me. Confronted mainly with the images conveyed of luxury in my pre-professional sector, it was necessary to realize that it was simple to see things from another angle (although I particularly like this universe), in a more down-to-earth way, by questioning our original needs. What is the purpose of wearing an accessory such as a jewel or a timepiece? As early as Generation Y, most people want to display an object first for the aesthetic and utilitarian image it conveys, instead of a simple monetary and therefore social representation. Although unfortunately this is still relevant today.... Everyone is responsible for what they want to put forward, even if it is only a simple image, but meaningful. Thus, the ethical foundations of our purchases have a greater impact than our meaningless sets. Today, the goal is to reach more people by following this mentality, focusing on the fundamental things, giving hope and returning to our original source, to which we owe so much: our Earth. And so no, I don't think we left to destroy everything! Our generation and those of the millenariums are sensitive to this kind of humanist questioning. We wonder how Man could have come to this point, to the point of imagining his own extinction... But we all see a glimmer of hope and want to create change, by respecting our environment, every animal, plant and mineral species in order to revolutionize the idea we already have of our irreparable future. So what can we do to provide such help, is it a simple image that some companies want to show to make more profit and avoid bloody proclamations? Where is it to really move forward and propose real solutions?

    Course of Study
    head_design_mode

    Tutors
    Grégory Gardinetti

    File
    934491dad432184d19ed984327952885.pdf

  • Comment les millennials transforment le marché du luxe

    Brandt, Chahnez

    HEAD

    2018

    HEAD, 2018

    Abstract
    Working in the world of design, I have often been confronted with luxury products and the advertisements that promote them. I am particularly interested in this market segment and have the ambition, in the long term, to create my own brand of high-end fashion watches. That is why I have undertaken to understand the evolution of luxury since the end of the 20th century. I was surprised to see a very big change that affects all luxury brands, all sectors combined, and is explicitly linked to the arrival of a new generation marking the end of an era: that of the millennials and their little sisters and brothers nicknamed the X and Y generations. In order to better understand my job and be more incisive in the future, I had to get up to date by analysing this global phenomenon, of which I knew nothing at first sight. But above all, what is luxury and what changes has it undergone recently? Luxury has always been reserved for the elite. It allows people of high status, leading a comfortable, even prestigious life thanks to superior quality properties, to distinguish themselves by possessing what is rare and inaccessible. For brands, luxury is a way to sell dreams to customers by claiming excellence and uniqueness. However, it must be said that luxury is gradually becoming more democratic and more affordable since the arrival of the Internet in 1990, which opened its doors so closed. There is a real craze on the part of brands for millennials whose values are deeply rooted in their own universe of digital natives. This characteristic differentiates them from their parents (known as the "Generation X") and makes them full-fledged consumers from adolescence onwards. This change is experienced as positive by brands that are taking hold of the phenomenon as a triumphant growth driver. The world of marketing then reinvents itself to speak the same language as this complex clientele. This thesis analyses the characteristics of millennials while giving concrete examples of brands in different segments as fashion, watchmaking and jewellery to propose solutions and strategies. Travaillant dans le monde du design, j’ai souvent été confrontée aux produits de luxe et aux publicités qui les vantent. Je suis particulièrement intéressée par ce segment du marché et j’ai l’ambition, à terme, de créer ma propre marque de montres fashion haut de gamme. C’est pourquoi j’ai entrepris de comprendre l’évolution du luxe depuis la fin du XXe siècle. J’ai constaté avec surprise un très grand changement qui touche l’entièreté des marques de luxe, tous domaines confondus, et qui est explicitement lié à l’arrivée d’une nouvelle génération marquant la fin d’une ère : celle des millennials et de leurs petites sœurs et petits frères surnommés les générations X et Y. Afin de mieux comprendre mon métier et être plus incisive à l’avenir, je me devais de me mettre au goût du jour en analysant ce phénomène mondial dont je ne connaissais rien de prime abord. Mais avant tout, qu’est-ce que le luxe et quels changements a-t-il récemment connu? Depuis toujours, le luxe est réservé à l’élite. Il permet aux personnes ayant un statut élevé, menant une vie aisée, voire prestigieuse grâce à des biens de qualité supérieure, de se distinguer en possédant ce qui est rare et peu accessible. Pour les marques, le luxe est un moyen de vendre du rêve à des clients en revendiquant l’excellence et l’unicité. Pourtant, force est de constater que le luxe se démocratise peu à peu et évolue en devenant plus abordable depuis l’arrivée d’internet en 1990 qui en a ouvert les portes si fermées. Il existe un réel engouement de la part des marques pour les millennials dont les valeurs sont très ancrées dans leur propre univers de digital natives. Cette caractéristique les différencie de leurs parents (dite « génération X ») et en fait des consommateurs à part entière dès l’adolescence. Cette mutation est vécue comme positive par les marques qui s’emparent du phénomène en tant que vecteur de croissance triomphant. Le monde du marketing se réinvente alors pour parler le même language que cette clientèle complexe. Ce mémoire analyse les caractéristiques des millennials tout en donnant des exemples concrets de marques touchant différents segments comme que la mode, l'horlogerie et la joaillerie pour proposer des solutions et des stratégies.

    Course of Study
    head_design_mode

    Tutors
    Elizabeth Fischer

    File
    d12f46a0944ae445e306de4fba52bfb8.pdf

  • Gameplay for learning

    Stephan, Megann

    HEAD

    2018

    HEAD, 2018

    Gameplay for learning 920 1

    Abstract
    Are some modalities of game design more or less relevant for andragogy? This question will be addressed from the situation of the Mischool platform. This thesis thus tends to demonstrate that in order to allow a better learning through the serious game, it is essential to take into account the very structure of the game and its gameplay. There are many solutions to improve the student experience and I intend to carry out research around andragogy and serious games, establish a state of the art as well as analyze the data collected. In order to be able, afterwards, to devote my practical work to the conception of a serious game at the end of the year.

    Course of Study
    HEAD Master Media Design

    Tutors
    Daniel Sciboz

    File
    ac13d7f871e31adf81145796518b8342.pdf

  • Future of dust / Notebook on the identity of dust and its in

    Marceau, Carla

    HEAD

    2018

    HEAD, 2018

    Future of dust notebook on the identity of dust and its in 922 1

    Abstract
    This is a speculative research based on scientific statement. I study dust through different environments looking at art, design and digital. I create objects adapted to a speculative world. This notebook of observation on dust is maintained by a French ethnographer in 2075. Europe has become dusty, affected by drought. The quality of the air is polluted, with a fine particle rate of 932 migrograms per cubic meter. The threshold set by the World Health Organization (WHO) is 75. Degrading the visibility of the horizon and the health of the inhabitants, responsible for one death every hour. The agglomeration of grains serves as a nest for bacteria, microorganisms, fungal spores .... which are suspended by wind and turbulence. A strong issue for the general population. With an increase of 3,940 microbes / m3 of air. Despite everything an air monitoring network has been set up imposing increasingly stringent ambient air quality standards through a European standardization allowing a technological improvement of vehicles or even the digital and by opting for policies of displacements and industrial discharges which contributed to a reduction of the emissions nitrogen oxide, 920 tonnes of CO2 less each day. This period is named Dry Cloud. It is then that the ethnographer tells his enchantment through the dust. He decides to do research on these dead but alive particles by focusing on his past and his interaction between different environments.

    Course of Study
    HEAD Master Media Design

    Tutors
    Nicolas Nova

  • Clouders

    Cottanceau, Pierre

    HEAD

    2018

    HEAD, 2018

    Image 933 1

    Abstract
    This research discusses how the users work on the clouds platform. How he stored his own datas? How he used this ? Is it important for others? I observed how people saved their files and the intention they had behind that move. All the data aren’t the same by their order of consultation and importance, but they have all the same alimentation of electricity. How the users could interact with their own datas to decrease the foot print of data center.

    Course of Study
    HEAD Master Media Design

    Tutors
    Nicolas Nova

    File
    144ff3d56727b6913aeb367fee591c6f.pdf

  • Unknown

    Hangartner, Mathias

    HEAD

    2018

    HEAD, 2018

    Course of Study
    HEAD Master Media Design

    Tutors
    Daniel Pinkas

    File
    d7b401b3cefdc875fcfdb48216ac65e8.png

  • Obsession spectrale

    Dubrez, Maeva

    HEAD

    2018

    HEAD, 2018

    Obsession spectrale 940 1
    Obsession spectrale 940 2
    Obsession spectrale 940 3

    Abstract
    In the 1970s, Deborah Turbeville is a representative figure in fashion photography alongside Guy Bourdin, Helmunt Newton and Sarah Moon. However, no in-depth study has been done on Deborah Turbeville’s approach. It must be an object of a research seeing as it involves a paradox. She claims her commercial collaborations as the sine qua non conditions of her creation but in the same time, she refuses the status of fashion photographer. Clothes become accessories of a staging outside fashion. The models are transformed into spectres by the overexposure of the photographic film. Shooting spaces take over the main roles. These are real places spotted for their sinister and ghostly atmosphere and are the opposite of the fashion industry. Obsession spectrale proposes to update the photographs of Deborah Turbeville. A hypothetical investigation extracts the central element of this contradiction. It is coming from an aesthetics of spectrality that refers to the concept of “hauntology” by Jacques Derrida. It is the result from a refusal of a mourning where a ghost continually haunts the space of an individual. The spectrality of Deborah Turbeville’s aesthetic invites us to do his “hantology” and leads us to explore the origin of her spectres.

    Course of Study
    head_espaces_communication

    Tutors
    Sébastien Quequet

    File
    4d26ee49cc799e98e79716d66d32b59d.jpg

  • Writing technologies for a plurality of expressions

    Opalinski, Remi

    HEAD

    2018

    HEAD, 2018

    Abstract
    In favor of digital technologies, 30% of world population is sharing their writing now : we write today more than we never have. While the digital wave’s full potential is currently in evaluation, she has already redefine each aspect of research, writing, edition, publication, and distribution and the circulation of textual works. Despite this, distants communications intensification and the technicals conditions of our writing tools create language standardization. At the same time, digital literature is developing at the periphery of the dominant economy. Theses strange littОratures could represent a strategies reservoir to explore for the designer to the benefit of an language expression plurality. Theses practices are in total rupture with writing tools structures, it could be softwares, search engine, proprietary platforms or social networks. From this point of view, what digital literature can teach us about the potentials futurs of writing technologies ?

    Course of Study
    HEAD Master Media Design

    Tutors
    Nicolas Nova

    File
    3e9fb52d48ac7018667f62cd00464617.pdf

  • La chaussure, le talon et ses paradoxes

    Verwicht, Eva

    HEAD

    2018

    HEAD, 2018

    Abstract
    La chaussure, le talon et ses paradoxes

    Course of Study
    head_design_mode

    Tutors
    Elizabeth Fischer

    File
    0d989a999e23f11e81c60135c5497ba3.pdf

  • Biotechnologies, la mode à l'épreuve du vivant

    Bruschi, Emma

    HEAD

    2018

    HEAD, 2018

    Abstract
    Biotechnologies, la mode à l'épreuve du vivant

    Course of Study
    head_design_mode

    Tutors
    Julie Bilaud

    File
    f35ffe3063e896cc0451718e19a358fc.pdf

  • Outrage! – (Social) Media and the Coaxing of the Moral Mind

    Pinkas, Simon

    HEAD

    2018

    HEAD, 2018

    Abstract
    In a paper published last year, Yale neuroscientist Molly Crockett asks: “If moral outrage is a fire, is the internet like gasoline?” If media designers strive to come up with interesting, thought-provoking digital experiences, then it is better that they understood the state of mass communication platforms such as Facebook. After all, it is through them that much of our contemporary culture and politics are mediated. Yet nowhere have I found a comprehensive, but non-technical account of one of our age’s defining features: the fact the moral outrage has become the default mode of political speech on Facebook. In this research, I argue that this phenomenon emerges from the interplay of three separate, but complimentary mechanisms: the evolutionary propensity of humans to feel and express moral outrage; a media landscape whose economy has favoured the emergence of outrage content; and a social network who thrives on engagement, of which moral outrage is such a reliable and potent purveyor.

    Course of Study
    HEAD Master Media Design

    Tutors
    Lysianne Lechot Hirt

  • Urbex & Mode

    Rappaz, Adeline

    HEAD

    2018

    HEAD, 2018

    Abstract
    Les parallèles entre la pratique de la mode et le mouvement urbex. En analysant différents artistes, designers et photographes.

    Course of Study
    head_design_mode

    Tutors
    Julie Billaud

    File
    6b182e2c0dc223586345c587755d932c.pdf

  • Mythologies dématerialisées

    Rojas, Netillo

    HEAD

    2018

    HEAD, 2018

    Abstract
    Ce mémoire traite des mythologies ayant vu le jour à l’ère d’une culture numérique globalisée. Entre objets, personnes et manifestations culturelles, à travers 8 textes et 3 collections d’image, ce travail tend à donner une vision large bien que non exhaustive d’une partie de ces mythes contemporains.

    Course of Study
    head_espaces_communication

    Tutors
    Alexandra Midal

  • La trace corporelle et son esthétisme

    Marquis, Aurore

    HEAD

    2018

    HEAD, 2018

    La trace corporelle et son esthetisme 947 1
    La trace corporelle et son esthetisme 947 2
    La trace corporelle et son esthetisme 947 3

    Abstract
    "Dans la littérature, une trace signifie ce qui subsiste du passé sous la forme de débris, de vestiges. Une trace signifie aussi une marque physique ou morale suite à un événement, une situation, une maladie. Dans ce mémoire, j’étudie la trace associée au corps. La marque qu’une plaie laisse sur le corps, la trace de naissance, les stigmates que révèle une forte émotion. Ces traces me ramènent au passé, à une certaine réalité quand on essaie d’oublier, à des émotions contradictoires telles la douleur et la joie, tout ce que la vie nous a appris. En comparaison à un journal intime, ces traces/marques/cicatrices représenteraient: les mots écrits, la peau : le papier, le journal. Quelles soient innées telle une tache ou laissées par une plaie, durables ou éphémères, ce sont des mots que nous n’avons pas décidé d’écrire, ce sont des mots qui se sont imposés à nous comme des véritables épisodes de notre vie. Ils ont leur propre forme, leur propre grandeur, leur propre épaisseur. Mais malgré tout, ils ne font qu’un avec notre corps. Ce sont devenus des symboles ; Ils s’imposent à nous, nous devons les accepter, et les assumer. Se posent alors des questions inévitables, comme des questions liées aux rapport au corps, ainsi qu’à la représentation de ce dernier et son acceptation. La société «miroir» interroge l’individu sur ce qu’il est et sur sa place dans la société. Les traces corporelles nous invitent à nous interroger sur la dimension esthétique. L’esthétisme au sens premier n’est pas vraiment concerné. Il s’agit d’esthétisme émotionnel; Par esthétisme émotionnel, je suggère, un esthétisme du ressenti qui procure des émotions fortes, qui fait appel à tous les sens. Nous pouvons parler de force esthétique à promouvoir tout autant que la beauté pure."

    Course of Study
    head_design_mode

    Tutors
    BILLAUD Julie

    File
    d864acb39f869ad491a1dd179e2d8871.pdf

  • Un sac peut-il être un objet de protection ?

    Kagny, Loren

    HEAD

    2018

    HEAD, 2018

    Abstract
    Un sac peut-il être un objet de protection ? - Vider : trier et jeter des objets - Remplir : accumuler et collectionner - Insuffler une vie aux objets -Le sac comme contenant (vide, plein)

    Course of Study
    head_design_mode

    Tutors
    Julie Billaud

    File
    25556d1fb81b9fe44d5ca875de9d41c0.pdf

  • Hybrid Public Spaces

    Gomez, Juan Andres

    HEAD

    2018

    HEAD, 2018

    Hybrid public spaces 965 1

    Abstract
    This text intends to give an overview of some current methods used nowadays for “smart” urbanism in physical spaces and aims to compare them critically in order to formulate a comprehensive toolkit for using them in contemporary urbanism practices for public space. Drawing on interviews with practitioners including artists, designers, architects, software developers and social activist, it brings together new (and sometimes opposing) perspectives on the issue. The diverse methods that will be examined are broad and I will try to establish a typology. Dealing with issues of decision making towards public space one can divide this into Bottom-up and Top-down planning as the first tries to prioritize the hyper-local and the second has a ‘master plan’ that is usually executed from a higher instance from an institutional point of view (town hall, etc). The people interviewed and the case projects that will find themselves to be in an in-between of this two planning methodologies;Hopefully this way of proceeding will show how this 2 types of urbanism are not excluding each other and can work together to create a better dialogue and lighten the number of points to be discussed during the process of place-making in public space. The rise of many of the DIY or guerrilla urbanism practices can be attributed due to the lack of involvement of inhabitants and users of public spaces in their co-creation and the lack of legal structures that facilitate temporary intervention or activities in them. The 3 case studies were chosen as helpers for better understanding the preferable and good practices for participatory methods for conceptualizing, designing and implementing their proposals. Two of the examples come from western European cities and one is mainly based in Russia but its outcomes are global. Despite many efforts of diverse local or national authorities for establishing participative processes in urban decisions, there seems to exist no rule of thumb on creating an open hybrid channel (digital and physical) for civic discussion about the future problematics of the city and I intend to develop a discourse on how a Hybrid Public Space like this could exist. Taking as common ground the texts from Richard Sennett among other thinkers that deal with the concepts of the public sphere and the commons I found important to share this text in an open manner as website for showing the references and documentation in depth. The result of this thesis aims to help users of public space questions about the digital infrastructural narratives presented by many private and institutional stakeholders but also for ones stated by the citizen or independent initiatives toward the use and co-creation for public space.

    Course of Study
    HEAD Master Media Design

    Tutors
    Lysianne Lechot Hirt

    File
    4b6bfdf5c5fccb3c43f396c5d95c2057.pdf

  • la réalité virtuelle pour raconter des histoires

    Faure, Salome

    HEAD

    2018

    HEAD, 2018

    Abstract
    Comment est-ce que les récits en réalité VR non multi-joueur peuvent générer une forme de collectivité?

    Course of Study
    HEAD Master Media Design

    Tutors
    Nicolas Nova

    File
    61f2c15c892b6ef9f4d17629e77c4390.pdf

  • From the consumer to the prosumer in the fashion industry

    Tanner, Luca

    HEAD

    2018

    HEAD, 2018

    Abstract
    On the basis of examples from different fashion, art and industry directions, a new method of fashion creation with the involvement of customers is being attempted in this written work. The approaches of the three actors, the handicraft enthusiast, the specialist and the digital native, are described as examples to analyse their methods and to get to know how people are performing handicraft work nowadays with the possibilities of using analogue or digital help. A way of production with new mechanical help should make it possible to shift the production back in a local area. It should be possible to give a certain part of the production to the consumer. The aim is to involve the customers in the fashion creation in order to create a system for the garments for them, so that they can modify, change and add other elements to the garments. This modular system should make the consumer appreciate the garments more. This could improve consumer behaviour and save resources.

    Course of Study
    head_design_mode

    Tutors
    Christiane Luible-Bär

    File
    b14fa8595db40a02454a78c77744ab4f.docx

  • VELOCITY

    Bobina, Diana

    HEAD

    2018

    HEAD, 2018

    Velocity 968 1

    Abstract
    After my research I realised that we live in a world of `image` and of `spaces in transition`. The modern human being passes through many spaces at a high speed. We read about the anthropological other`s functions and personality by the dress in first place. I realised that dress codes won`t dissolve over night, it took thousand of years to establish them. Instead I can introduce into the everyday wear or even the more formal garments elements from sportswear for freedom of movement, intelligent pockets from military uniforms and smart textiles from technical wear.

    Course of Study
    head_design_mode

    Tutors
    Elizabeth Fischer

    File
    d8d8e37caf4b982a9a87ba64c1a49d4d.pdf

  • Larme Modèle

    M'toumo, Marvin

    HEAD

    2018

    HEAD, 2018

    Abstract
    Si nous pouvions parler de larmes de l’en de- dans et de larmes de l’en dehors, nous serions obli- gées de séparer nos pleurs en larmes contenues et en larmes qui débordent de nous. Nous devrions aussi distinguer dans celle-ci celles qui sont utilisées, ma- nipulées ou exercées. Le débit de nos eaux serait à analyser de pair avec leur contexte d’apparition. Les larmes n’étant pas structurées uniquement par l’émotion, elles ne sont pas que des phénomènes bio- logiques, mais aussi des phénomènes culturels et re- lationnels. Les contextes quand ils la sollicitent, per- mettent aussi de la lire de façon très spécifique. On ne pleure pas au travail, comme on pleurerait dans l’intimité d’une chambre. On ne dit pas les mêmes choses avec des sanglots articulés vocalement et des sanglots gardés dans le silence. Puisqu’elles peinent dans nos interactions à appa- raître comme des éléments purement physiologiques, leur contexte et les expressions corporelles à travers 27 INTRODUCTION lesquelles elles s’expriment restent des éléments très pertinents à analysés. Les observer exclusivement à travers le prisme biologique et ne garder en tête que cet aspect serait alors dommage. Bien sûr dans notre métabolisme, elles sont char- gées de rétablir le calme après une accumulation de tension dans le corps. Elles ont alors une double fonction protectrice : nous protéger l’œil et protéger notre psychologie d’un débordement émotionnelle violent. Elles seraient une façon pour le système parasympathique de nous laisser vider notre sac à temps, et d’ouvrir le barrage pour éviter l’inondation. Il est avéré que ces larmes ont des causes physiques : douleurs, poussières, allergies, agressions de corps extérieures, mais nous ne pouvons résister à l’envi de les observer en tant que signe. Pour nous, la glande lacrymale n’agit pas unique- ment pour protéger la cornée, elle agit en contexte. Le larmoiement n’est pas simplement comme le voit la science un débordement d’eau salée sur la cornée et en contre bas de la paupière, mais un phénomène chargé symboliquement. Pour autant, l’objet de ce mémoire n’est pas unique- ment de comprendre les enjeux associés aux larmes plutôt de les mettre en perspectives avec la condition très particulière des personnes qui les expriment. Ici, précisément, nous nous intéresserons à la figure du mannequin et à ses émotions.

    Course of Study
    head_design_mode

    Tutors
    Julie Billaud

    File
    525d715e5af373a6f5c88c41fcd53a22.pdf

  • Controlling objects, from active to passive

    Moynier, Victor

    ECAL

    2017

    ECAL, 2017

    Abstract
    Touching, turning, pressing, taping, scrolling, sliding, opening, lifting, the list of gestures connecting a user with an object is almosty endless, though behind the choregraphy of our daily interactions, lies a range of parameters and meaning. Since mankind used flint to create fire, the development of objects’ interfaces has since been following different eras according to technological evolutions. If, for a major part of our history, those gestures were mainly physical, the latest technologies brought new interfaces languages. We can today see a shift from active and physical interfaces, such as buttons, knobs or slides to a more passive way of using the products that surround us. Objects are now thought to be able to take micro-decisions, your I-phone will be unlocked without trigeering any control, thanks to facial recognition, SLR cameras adjust the right settings according to each situation, etc. This memoire aims to understand the evolution of gestures in the relation we maintain with objects and the value of tangibility.

    Course of Study
    ECAL Product Design

    Tutors
    Anniina Koivu & Brynjar Sigurðarson

    File
    0d3a973eb141c1fa0216edf5e8913ced.pdf

  • Do AIs Dream of Digital Typefaces ? The Type Designer’s Esse

    Jean-Mairet, Guillaume

    ECAL

    2017

    ECAL, 2017

    Abstract
    This Thesis is a research project about the Type designer’s true skills, the ones no machine can hope to do in the near future. Through a historical analysis of the field of type design and its evolution through technological advances, the question is raised: What tasks are soon to be automated, and what are the ones that can’t? What skills make a type designer? By analyzing the process of a type designer handling a project from start to finish, one can notice the patterns differentiating automatable tasks from their opposite, thus revealing the type designer’s essence.

    Course of Study
    ECAL Type Design

    Tutors
    Roland Frueh, Wayne Daly

  • Proxtension. A discourse about Typography as extension/acti

    Federico, Paviani

    ECAL

    2017

    ECAL, 2017

    Proxtension the printed body handbook 774 1

    Abstract
    Proxtension is an ongoing research project that investigates how type design and typography might have a cultural impact on the social patterns, as media and its consequently visual results. The research offers some reflections about how typography might be used as part of the action and reaction, especially in counterculture printed matters. Proxtension is a mash-up word that it is combined by “Prox(imity)”, as nearness or imminence, and “Extension” referred to the human capability to use media as self-outtering. In this sense, Proxtension means the “imminence extension” of the action and reaction derived by the use of typography and graphic design. From the counter-culture zines to the speculative type-design approach, this research in an open discourse.

    Course of Study
    ECAL Type Design

    Tutors
    Roland Frueh, Wayne Daly

  • The heart of the hospital

    Chevrier, Bastien

    ECAL

    2017

    ECAL, 2017

    Abstract
    As a place dedicated to health, a hospital building must be a space for healing, life that will play an important role in helping patients and their families. The atmosphere of the place is very important for patients, staff and care. For all of us, When we talk about hospitals, we often hear the words overloaded, lack of humanism and organization, long wait times, with tight budgets, difficult traffic... Has today’s Hospital Model become obsolete?

    Course of Study
    ECAL Product Design

    Tutors
    Anniina Koivu & Brynjar Sigurðarson

    File
    4f6e587005ea5506151dc9061d777b15.pdf

  • Retracing the grid: The Theo Ballmer archive in context

    Garcia Rennó Pereira, Eduardo

    ECAL

    2017

    ECAL, 2017

    Image 777 1

    Abstract
    Design history is complex and fluid, with many factors and characters affecting its styles and attitude changes, nonetheless is very tempting to get attached to milestones, turning points, as events that changed a whole zeitgeist, because that creates a comprehensive narrative we can grasp. To analyze the work of a specific character in this history and to try to find connections within the surrounding context during a specific time span, appears to be an interesting way to see what affects the whole visual landscape of a specific generation, and also a way, to expand the knowledge beyond the narrowed down narratives. The character in question here is Theo Ballmer, often present in design history, praised for his very precise constructive, also political posters and the context of this character is the graphic design made between the years of 1920 to 1940s, his most prolific time as designer and teacher. The innovative aspect of his geometric lettering and illustrations, all in a very cohesive whole, set him apart as one of the precursors of the Swiss style. He was part of an elite of Swiss designers that attended the ZHDK during Ernst Keller teaching period, and also later attended the Bauhaus in Dessau during its most politically turbulent time. In the later years of his career his works seemed to lean more towards photography and teaching, both activities in which he also cared a strong methodical, technical and analytical approach. My aim here is to investigate how does his education, the cultural landscape and technology of the time shaped his career and personal style and how this style situates him in the broader context of Swiss graphic design.

    Course of Study
    ECAL Type Design

    Tutors
    Roland Fruh

    File
    38de0c338dd5b3a3ac94fc8620c04dd9.pdf

  • The state of creativity in contemporary photography

    Świerczyński, Robert

    ECAL

    2017

    ECAL, 2017

    Image 778 1

    Abstract
    Appropriation art used to recontextualize whatever it borrowed to create the new work. But today when the ability to take ”nice photos” has become quite common, copying, all of a sudden, turned out to be an efficient way of producing the complete NEW. Without remembering or even taking into consideration which artist came up with an idea first. Contemporary art is now constantly being measured by the modernist criteria of novelty and originality, even if it ruthlessly draws on its history or long-established visual formulas. In such circumstances, how can a photographer be original? Is it still possible to look at the world differently than through the prism of billions of images of which this world is a hero and in which it usually comes out pretty boring?

    Course of Study
    ECAL Photography

    Tutors
    Joël Vacheron

    File
    c686978248c673fe51bafbf838b5ba62.pdf

  • Nothing lasts forever - The wear of Products in Sport

    Maluska, Sebastian

    ECAL

    2017

    ECAL, 2017

    Nothing lasts forever the wear of products in sport 782 1

    Abstract
    In the past almost everybody had a sewing machine at home. Not necessarily to create new clothes or textiles but to repair the old and broken once. The shoemaker replaces the expired shoe soles and the tailor could mend the jackets. New products are not made to take care of. If your running shoes are expired you have to buy a new pair. Modern outdoor products are assembled of many different materials under complex production methods and processes. If one of these materials is feeble, it creates a weak spot for the whole object. A small hole in a shell jacket, a weak glue line on a wetsuit or a broken zipper on a pant eliminates the main function and makes the whole object valueless. Because of complex production methods, such as welding, glueing and 3D Knitting, its no more possible to replace this material or repair the broken region either by yourself or by a craftsman. As a reaction the costumer trows it away, and buys a new one. That starts the problematic of waste. Are new products are not made to take care of? How can we design for repair?

    Course of Study
    ECAL Product Design

    Tutors
    Koivu Anniina, Brynjar Sigurðarson

  • The soft language of objects

    Estrada, Oscar

    ECAL

    2017

    ECAL, 2017

    The soft language of objects 785 2
    The soft language of objects 785 3

    Abstract
    All objects have a hidden side, features beneath the surface that define their character but are not essential to it's purpose or functionality. Just like humans have soft and hard skills, and computers and made up by hardware and software, objects are composed by hard and soft attributes. They are subjective and emotional, and cannot be quantified or measured by objective means. For the most part, these attributes have to do with the character of the product and its user-experience. Soft-Attributes are mainly the purview of industrial designers and range in the sensory containing scent, sound, taste, touch and sight. In some cases the soft attributes will be there for a reason and they are called intentional attributes, like a lightweight camping chair, supposed to be carried and therefore the selection of material is intentional. In other cases they will be a consequence of other decisions taken in the design process like the choice of material, function, mechanisms, etc. These soft attributes are the ones that affect our emotional connection with a product and have a considerable impact on our behavior. This is due to their influence in our processes of perception, attention, learning or decision making. Perception is defined as the top-down processing, involving knowledge stored in our memory, that will result in the attribution of meaning relating our senses to certain events or objects evoking cognitive emotions.

    Course of Study
    ECAL Product Design

    Tutors
    Anniina Koivu, Brynjar Sigurðarson

  • Olivetti: between design and art

    Pedrazzi, Aline

    ECAL

    2017

    ECAL, 2017

    Abstract
    Olivetti was born in the 1908 in Turin and was the first factory that design and produce typewriters in Italy. The industry was based on the promotion of culture and art, and for this reason, international well-known artists and designers were called to design advertising, products and typefaces for typewriters. The goal of the research is to investigate the relationship that Olivetti established with two designers and artists that in the 1958 designed two typefaces for the typewriter Graphika: Imre Reiner and A.M Cassandre. How Olivetti managed these collaboration, and what they gave in terms values to the multi millionaire typewriter company? According to the professional background of these two designers/artists, what can we find in the typefaces done for Olivetti that has this "artistic flavour"? This topic not only allows me to go deepen in the connection between this industry and the international artistic scene, but it is also a good opportunity to reflect on a subject that concerns all people who are part of the world of creativity: the border between art and design. A debate as subjective as tireless.

    Course of Study
    ECAL Type Design

    Tutors
    Roland Früh

  • Translation: Drawings / Objects

    Picciotto, Alexandre

    ECAL

    2017

    ECAL, 2017

    Translation drawings 787 1
    Translation drawings 787 2
    Translation drawings 787 3

    Abstract
    Translation is “the activity of changing spoken or written words into a different language”. The sketch is one of the first step of creation. From the drawing to the object, a series of steps appear in order to construct the project. But the way we see and interpret things affect the production. Culture, background and influences play a fundamental role in the process of creating objects that surround us. By analysing the different types of translation from the drawing to the object (and the other way around), how do the objects that inhabits our environment appear? What is the importance of interpretation in the making of the product? Why some sketches are very close to the final object? What kinds of changes occurs between the stage of drawing and the production of the object?

    Course of Study
    ECAL Product Design

    Tutors
    Anniina Koivu & Brynjar Sigurdarson

  • Sin titulo01.psd

    Merino, Ignacio

    ECAL

    2017

    ECAL, 2017

    Abstract
    Full and empty, justice and injustice, day and night, beauty and ugly, Realism and Impressionism, both faces of the coin should be pictured with attention to realize the whole panorama. 90’s decade was arriving wrapped in the voragine of globalized commerce, dot-com bubble, microprocessor and a landscape of new possibilities associated to massive communication. From the Tamagochi to the Nokia 3310, kids and adults carrying electronic devices in their pockets for first time. Awesome for all til the punctilious makes the question “what if…”. Critical Design was born stimulated by the new forms of interaction and communication that were taking place along this period. Surrounded by the intellectual environment of RCA, A. Dunne and F. Raby formalized during the 90’s decade a proper methodology to research through design, to question the status of design and to stimulate the critical thought regarding the postmodern paradigm. Critical Design is a modern representative example of what it was Dadaism or Radical Design among other along history. Look around you and question yourself where all it is driving us.

    Course of Study
    ECAL Product Design

    Tutors
    Anniina Koivu, Brynjar Sigurdarson

  • Omnipresent, pervasive and instantly recognizable: mascots a

    Banchi, Margherita

    ECAL

    2017

    ECAL, 2017

    Omnipresent pervasive and instantly recognizable mascots a 789 1
    Omnipresent pervasive and instantly recognizable mascots a 789 2
    Omnipresent pervasive and instantly recognizable mascots a 789 3

    Abstract
    I was visiting the Olympic Museum in Lausanne when I bumped into a crowd of stuffed toys of Olympic Mascots displayed and lighten as if they were characters performing on a stage. As potential applicant I went through the specifications of the creative brief for the Olympic and Paralympic Games Tokyo 2020 Game Ambassador understanding the complexity of thoughts behind what seemed to me, at first glance, a bizarre and intriguing stuffed character. The applicants have to demonstrate their creativity and abilities to meet the expectations of people all over the world and create a mascot that will be loved by everyone. This latter requisite - be loved by everyone - led me taking the design of this character as seriously as any other object of design. Mascots are seen by billions of eyes and experienced in situ by thousands of people: how can I create a visual which is viscerally connected to such a wide and broad audience? Are there any criterions, parameters or standards to follow while shaping an object - or a subject – which has to “be loved by everyone” regardless of gender, culture and age? Eventually, I became convinced that knowing something more about the origins and meanings of mascots can add enjoyment and appreciation of the stuffed characters. A well-illustrated analysis would also provide the inspiration – and the information – which would open the debate about the future of mascots.

    Course of Study
    ECAL Product Design

    Tutors
    Koivu Anniina; Brynjar Sigurðarson

    File
    5e9b1ec0fbf15e5c670564e8c209e8c8.jpg

  • Tiny Homes : Living in minimum space

    Jang, Yesul

    ECAL

    2017

    ECAL, 2017

    Tiny homes living in minimum space 790 1

    Abstract
    These days, many of people moves to tiny spaces for living. The reasons why people are looking for smaller houses are not only high living cost and lack of space in the big city but also phycological reason and a change of perception of house. Then why this kind of tiny home phenomenon was occurred, how people react for this changes and what can be the new type of living spaces and furnitures for the next generation? This research is done by looking into current trends of tiny living space focusing on history and examples analysis of how people adapt to small spaces.

    Course of Study
    ECAL Product Design

    Tutors
    Anniina Koivu, Brynjar Sigurðarson

    File
    4c9d3b0ad69a7ba83df5a4aab70b3c6f.pdf

  • The reality of space science fiction

    Missé, Thomas

    ECAL

    2017

    ECAL, 2017

    The reality of space science fiction 792 1
    The reality of space science fiction 792 2

    Abstract
    Since civilizations exist the outer space is a place of fascination, the stars and planets have triggered such curiosity that we try to reach them since centuries. From the propelled chair of Wang Hu in the 16th century to our nowadays Dragon capsules from SpaceX, humanity made an incredible leap fuel by the share of a dream and of ingenuity. This dream of conquering the stars can be traced to the beginning of the first century when Lucien of Samosata wrote about its trip to the moon on its book True stories, opening the path to the science fiction. From the several stage rocket imagined by Cyrano de Bergerac in the 17th century and currently used today, to the movie A trip to the moon put on screen in 1902 and brought to reality 67 years later by the NASA, science fiction has always been in dialogue with space science. Inspiring engineer to create the tools to realize the stories read by so many. What happened since we reached the Moon?

    Course of Study
    ECAL Product Design

    Tutors
    Anniina Koivu / Brynjar Sigurōarson

    File
    d15bb2cb738de91c151d473622dc10ad.pdf

  • Materialising Color

    Pacheco, Catarina

    ECAL

    2017

    ECAL, 2017

    Abstract
    Colors interact with each other and create optical illusions, materialized in textiles and products. It is also a standardized element in the product design industry and a matter of research for Hella Jonguerious to bring new possibilities to the field. Based on Josef Albers studies, there is a difference between the physical aspect of colors and the way our eyes perceived them. He explore optical effects such the duotone, seen in Kvadrat textiles and products for Vitra. As director of Color and Material Library for Vitra, Jonguerious has been working with the limitations and standards of color in the industry and collaborating with other designers – authors. Recognizing the missing qualities of color and texture on products, she has been conducting studies to open new directions. Color can be seen as constant changing element, because it depends of ligh, materiality, context and our own perception and memory, being a subjective entity. The work of Hella opens new paths of how color works and can be applied on products: working with the implications of the industry but pushing new possibilities aswell.

    Course of Study
    ECAL Product Design

    Tutors
    Annina Koivu, Brynjar Sigurðarson

    File
    55e0343af95aadebd6e3bd1d33644803.pdf

  • A case history of art direction in Italian type design

    Tomatis, Davide

    ECAL

    2017

    ECAL, 2017

    A case history of art direction in italian type design 795 1

    Abstract
    Studio Artistico Nebiolo - A case history of art direction in Italian type design. An analysis of the turning points that made Nebiolo the best Italian type foundry and the only one which was able to compete with the others major european foundries. The decision of Giulio da Milano to introduce the "Studio Artistico" in 1930, through which the foundry started investing in the drawing of original typefaces, and the introduction of the internal advertising department which created a straight marketing strategy cooperating side by side with the artistic studio directed by Aldo Novarese. “Forma” and "Dattilo" will be presented as the best examples of their work: a unique workflow that involved a group of the most famous Italian graphic designers of the time as a consultancy team. An unprecedented example of documentation and storytelling around the creation of the typefaces allowed them to make customers conscious of the quality but also of the backstage complexity in the type design process.

    Course of Study
    ECAL Type Design

    Tutors
    Roland Früh, Wayne Daly

  • Good Copy Good: Positive aspects of Copying

    Park, Chelsea Jihong

    ECAL

    2017

    ECAL, 2017

    Good copy good positive aspects of copying 796 1

    Abstract
    The word “copy” is commonly projected as a negative image especially in the creative industry. The research will focus on positive side of “copy” by framing around synonyms such as replication, imitation, reproduction, mirroring, and repetition. By expanding the idea of “copy”, the affirmative references can be easily accepted throughout the history of human being. Very early stage of a human growth, copying(observation learning) starts as an act of imitating. As we grow, we remember and learn by copying(repeating) ourselves. Many academic artists have multiple originals of their own paintings as a result of mastering through repetition. Before the printing techniques are widely disseminated, artists had a looser gesture on copyrights and not claiming ownership considered as a humble gesture. These days, Open Source Movement is another positive case of encouraging people to replicate and reproduce for the greater improvements. Offering new angles of “copy” suggests readers to have a broader perspective on the word “copy” and to be more open minded on copying.

    Course of Study
    ECAL Product Design

    Tutors
    Anniina Koivu, Brynjar Sigurðarson

    File
    d1f904cb46023f438913ece9d3e37e7f.pdf

  • The story behinds the image.

    Kao, Mu Hau

    ECAL

    2017

    ECAL, 2017

    The story behinds the image 797 1
    The story behinds the image 797 2
    The story behinds the image 797 3

    Abstract
    Photographic perspectives can turn an ordinary object into the only thing that matters in the world, just a different way of seeing will changes our perceptions. Characters can hint at different kinds of stories, what they wear, their age or social status, the movements, and what object they are holding are all small details that want to trigger the audiences wish to understand them. Series can create an image like a deja vu, represent a scene in many different ways, repetitively embedding the idea into our memories. Telling a good story requires good understanding of stories. As a designer, how you like to tell your story through images, to clients, media, to the world. In the end it might be the most powerful tool to communicate our ideas.

    Course of Study
    ECAL Product Design

    Tutors
    Anniina Koivu, Brynjar Siguroarson

    File
    12fc15b325cdba71a4081c55e202ca26.pdf

  • Pictorial abstractions of movement

    Lehmann, Kaj

    ECAL

    2017

    ECAL, 2017

    Image 799 1
    Image 799 2

    Abstract
    When motion is shown on a static medium (e.g. books, posters, canvas), one needs to add a visual trick to indicate the direction, speed or flux of the motion. Over the course of the last century our eyes got trained to recognise many of these tricks, we understand for example speedlines or know the meaning of an arrow icon. My research is an attempt to create a collection of visualisations of motions, categorise them and investigate their development in history. A website (Domain soon tba) has been founded to support the research. This website works an open platform: It’s a public archive of visual examples, essays and projects related to the topic. The ultimate goal is for the platform to become an idea-triggering tool for designers, artists and photographers.

    Course of Study
    ECAL Type Design

    Tutors
    Wayne Daly, Roland Früh

  • The relationship of food to tableware

    ECAL

    2017

    ECAL, 2017

    The relationship of food to tableware 800 1
    The relationship of food to tableware 800 2

    Abstract
    Conventional circular plates and bowls function perfectly as they are. Nevertheless, the vessels used to hold food are still evolving. In order to make food more compelling, and to add speciality to eating, high-end restaurants are offering experimental styles of dishes. Even if you do not go to fine restaurants, unique types of bowls and utensils designed for specific dishes are easily found around us and it is interesting to see how they are developed in different ways to adopt to its own food culture. We often say, the form follows function. If the form follows the function, does the form of the plate follow the function- let’s say- serving? Then does shape follow food or the other way around? If the function of the bowl is simply to hold the food, what does the specially crafted vessels mean? There must be more than only function of presenting food nicely. This essay will be dealing with this questions and collecting examples to show variety of styles in dinnerware that are specially invented.

    Course of Study
    -

    Tutors
    Anniina Koivu, Brynjar Sigurðarson

    File
    d4bdd6e0c377c5320092c3769247c0eb.jpg

  • Generations of Czechoslovakian typography

    Ondrej, Báchor

    ECAL

    2017

    ECAL, 2017

    Generations of czechoslovakian typography 801 1
    Generations of czechoslovakian typography 801 3

    Abstract
    Although the history of typography in Czechoslovakia is one with a short historical timeline, it on the other hand has a rich and developing culture of typography. The work of Czechoslovakian’s designers has been recognized within the international scene of type and graphic designers for its original style which indicates at its idiosyncrasies and its differences. This research is focused on the period of the Czechoslovakian typography scene between the years 1950 and 1970. Their first design of typefaces that reflected the needs of a new socialist structure, and with it, new ideologies. The aim of this research is to analyze and compare a new production of typefaces with the previous era. Discuss the aesthetic elements typical for their style together with defined opinions about the functional aspects of the typefaces in Czechoslovakia.

    Course of Study
    ECAL Type Design

    Tutors
    Roland Früh, Wayne Daly

  • The International Typeface Corporation

    Grunewald, Eliott

    ECAL

    2017

    ECAL, 2017

    Abstract
    ITC is an American type-foundry created in 1971 in New-York City by Aarons Burns, Herb Lubalin and Edward Rondthaler. These 3 founders were at that time some of the best “actors” in the graphic and typographic landscape, not only in America but everywhere in the world. This company was founded as a new platform to sell typefaces through subscription in order to propose new faces differents from the “classics” and “bestsellers” from that time distributed by the big type companies like Linotype or Monotype. That’s also one of the world’s first type foundries to be created without a past in “metal” fonts. It is one of the most influential and successful type foundry of the 70’s and the 80’s, they invented a new way to sell typefaces through subscription from the phototypesetting equipments manufacturers, and asked them to pay royalties on every font they sell. That was a way to revitalise the type design market, by paying royalties directly to the type designers and provoque a big wave of new and original type-design all over the world. Some of the most famous typefaces from ITC are ITC Avant-Garde Gothic, ITC Souvenir, ITC Serif Gothic, ITC Garamond, ITC Franklin Gothic. They are also famous and reputed for the publication their created called U&Lc. A magazine quite specialised in type, graphic, and illustration, proposing interesting content, displaying the last work of designers from America and Europe, and of course proposing the last ITC releases typefaces.

    Course of Study
    ECAL Type Design

    Tutors
    Roland Früh, Wayne Daily

    File
    b6af62b4203a54dcca665d458f53bbc7.jpg

  • Money the object

    Beer, Eva-Maria

    ECAL

    2017

    ECAL, 2017

    Abstract
    On February 13 2017 I decided to find out everything about money. Focusing more and more on the making of paper money and the related techniques, my research exclusively covers the development of bills and not their financial background. What I found out so far is that the business is very secure even mysterious which makes it sometimes hard to get information. The study looks like a diary were I describe when I found out something new and what I want to reach with this information. The main topics are the materialities such as the security paper, ink, motivs and security features and their development and influences. Because banknotes are not only instruments that serve as currency in certain countries or currency areas, but are commonplace in our daily live, they are as practical as possible and yet unique in their design. Banknotes have the highest security standards and their characteristics are constantly being developed. Therefore they are not a simple piece of paper but complex objects.

    Course of Study
    ECAL Product Design

    Tutors
    Anniina Koivu, Brynjar Sigurðarson

    File
    7680b2686e62bf307d86e52bffec991e.pdf

  • Traces of movement

    De Juan, Alma

    ECAL

    2017

    ECAL, 2017

    Traces of movement 806 1

    Abstract
    From among all the artistic fields, dance is the only one that has had a continuous relation with oral tradition in Western Culture. This one characteristic remains linked to the history of dancing and its identity. To access the nature of dance, whether it is by perceptual means or by performing it, is a direct access which steps in the heart of emotion, above all in contemporary dance. In this sense, dancing does not seem to have anything to do with a symbolic system which would reduce and summarize the sensitive tissue of movement to a universal graphology. Nevertheless, although its apparent independence with the written world, the choreographic drawing has always been present in dance history. The movement has incessantly wanted to enrol itself and remain remembered; what is to say, to be fixed. And amongst every representative and notation system in dance, few have had as much influence as the one created by Rudolf Laban in the 20’s. The depth and conceptual novelty of his discoveries contributed to its wide spreading and universal ambition. Sigurd Leeder, together with the choreograph and pedagogue Albrecht Knust, contributed deeply in the development and study of Laban’s kinetography. But like the rest of dance notation systems, it does not have a lineal and progressive development. Its modest nature, ephemeral and without any kind of supposed enduring for the dance scores, leads these systems to ambiguous cultural status, with no authority positions or symbolic references. No edict, no clergyman or typographic federation has ever try to fix them —as it was the case of word and music—. Thus, this research —being fundamentally based on two great figures in the realm of dance and contemporary notation, Rudolf Laban and Sigurd Leeder— is aiming to propose an answer to questions such as the need for constant transformation of notation systems in dance and the search of a choreographic score capable to describe any human movement.

    Course of Study
    ECAL Type Design

    Tutors
    Roland Früh and Wayne Daly

  • Human Behavior in Urban Spaces

    Khan, Yuliya

    ECAL

    2017

    ECAL, 2017

    Human behavior in urban spaces 807 1
    Human behavior in urban spaces 807 2
    Human behavior in urban spaces 807 3

    Abstract
    In the same way as behaviorists, photographers within the decades found their fascination in studying human behavior and used it as a source of inspiration and theme for their practice. Particular patterns of certain behavior, human gestures, postures and ways of interactions in urban spaces were observed and studied not only by sociologists but also artists. However, is there a particular shift or change in our behavior in urban spaces due to the presence of surveillance and awareness of being constantly watched, this is the main question of my research. This work will analyze different approaches of observing human behavior in urban spaces by various artists mainly from the 60s to the present days.

    Course of Study
    ECAL Photography

    Tutors
    Joel Vacheron

    File
    1821aa6b71b41bc3bae8680a1baea88f.pdf

  • From Collection, Archive to [Re]Creation.

    Noh, Miji

    ECAL

    2017

    ECAL, 2017

    From collection archive to re creation 808 1
    From collection archive to re creation 808 2
    From collection archive to re creation 808 3

    Abstract
    A short narrative essay on visiting the universe of collections, archives, indexing and cataloging methods throughout the past – present – future, in a parallel r “Collect - Archive - (Re)Creation.” Paul Valery once said; “Two dangers threaten the universe : order and disorder.” - from La Crise de l’Esprit(1919). I believe that any absolute, and at the same time, extreme principle certainly can not become an applicable tool to create a lineal performance on how we could carry our growing legacy in life, including art and design culture - in an universal aspect. We are living in an fast-phased advanced age with ever-blasting and blooming creations of new archetype of things born in every seconds, in need for another up-to-date form of archiving and re-producing new knowledge. Every existing matter on this planet is now maybe going through the phase of getting converted into ‘Physital’ state in some ways. But there can be strict orders and liberal chaos - coexisting in a fine grey zone - and in certain fields of areas such as, of course in science but also in literature, fine art and design research per say, that could own both values in parallel. For now and the future, I strongly weigh my view that the way the universe and the subordinates arranged should be transparent, fluid, superfluous and become more independent and subjective as well. In this memoire research it is my aim to find a very subjective archive method around us and as well as institutions supporting the creative activity, with a very subjective system that helps to create unique possibilities to uncover the unknown, undefined, undiscovered territories of archived materials and what or how a user can make a use of the findings. This way a user could become a curator him/herself mix n’ matching and pairing up information that can only come from the very own individual’s mind and produce next level stimulations, references and marks. In conclusion, our history of art, design, culture and its legacy exists - heavily dependant on and derives from documentations, collections, archiving and indexing methods from the birth momentum within the historical frame of human kind. So then, how does a collection start ? Why? From a personal interest, story, motivation, organization ? How does it stay alive and gets enriched ? Furthermore, what is the future of the new advanced collection and archiving methods? Moreover, what is its physital aspect to have positive influence and effect our next generation ? This research will explore and investigate notable examples and figures regarding the subject of collection and its results, t presenting the status quo and deliver a suggestive theory for the coming future cases.

    Course of Study
    ECAL Product Design

    Tutors
    Anniina Koivu & Brynjar Sigurðarson

    File
    fae0f732c754034369251e4c4cd938be.pdf

  • Revisiting André Gürtler

    Bredstrup, Malte Bentzen

    ECAL

    2017

    ECAL, 2017

    Image 810 1

    Abstract
    The purpose of this paper is to rediscover the legacy of the Swiss type-designer André Gürtler through research of his rich archive donated to the cantonal library of St. Gallen and through interviews with affiliated designers. Even though André Gürtler can be seen as one of the more influential designers of the Swiss modernism, working with amongst other Adrian Frutiger and later Team 77, not much have been written about him and his work. The research shows a diverse practise in type-design with artistic and commercial projects in a range of different techniques, from amongst other, calligraphy to phototypesetting. A personal practise that at first may seem contradictory, but at further studying shares a light on the development of modern type-design in Switzerland. The paper searches to discuss how a humanistic approach was manifested in a modernist rational era and even more directly how André Gürtler was successful in creating constructed letter-forms with a sense of the human spirit.

    Course of Study
    ECAL Type Design

    Tutors
    Roland Früh, Wayne Daily

  • Blend into your home

    Bae, Byongseon

    ECAL

    2017

    ECAL, 2017

    Abstract
    During the Industrial Revolution, electricity, a new form of energy that was not available before, was introduced along with various products that eased the burden of house chores. Electronic appliances are like organisms evolving through various influences of the external environment. Along with new technology and material development, new products are produced by applying these developments and as they become released in the market, the life cycle of the product begins. The evolutionary process includes the birth, growth, and decadence and extinction processes and it displays consistent changes following the variations in the external environment such as people’s lifestyle. Lately, one interesting fact about trends that are being introduced in the electronic appliance market is that some products are being released again in the market with an appearance that takes after the appliances that were initially available in the market. In other words, electronic appliances are not simply aimed at functioning as machines to reduce house chores as it provides interior decoration and also harmonizes with the house atmosphere and gives off a friendly and familiar feeling to the users. However, this tendency did not just start in recent times. Since the past, every time a new technology or a product that was not available before appeared, manufactures and designers exerted different efforts so that people can accept it without any unfamiliar feelings. The purpose of this research is to explore the changes and attempts that were made ever since the invention of electricity, which led to the appearance of electronic appliances as well as why people create products in a familiar style by identifying the periods of the chronicle. It will be through surveying the history of the designs in order to predict the future of the products that will be introduced hereafter.

    Course of Study
    ECAL Product Design

    Tutors
    Anniina Koivu, Brynjar Sigurðarson

    File
    01f0cafd82e395db03338d3cd6f8f462.jpg

  • Appropriation in digital age

    Nam, Eunwook

    ECAL

    2017

    ECAL, 2017

    Appropriation in digital age 812 1
    Appropriation in digital age 812 2

    Abstract
    So-called prosumers, who consume and produce simultaneously, operate on a vast digital archive. They use copy-paste, drag-and-drop, and mashup and bootleg technologies to borrow existing data-driven images, sounds, or concepts. It became a regular life so much that we are not even conscious of it. The history of appropriation is deep in art. It has been rapidly becoming widespread through the postmodern era, and now in the digital age it is becoming a natural phenomenon, and even at the same time, the boundaries of are widening. This research is to find the relationship between appropriation art and consuming culture. Commercial media and appropriation art are inseparable. In the 1980s, Richard Prince, who occupied a significant position in art, appropriated Marlboro advertising photographs, and in the 1980s he portrayed pictures of Marlboro cigarette advertisements has been cut mainly from magazines. The later art critics interpreted it as 'an experiment in which the meaning and context of the commercial image changed as the place where the commercial image was selected and displayed by the artist.’ Through this research, I will analyze how fine art takes images of commercial properties in the process of reconstruction and what it means in its context. Finally, it will be an interrogation of its potential if these could be reapplied to commercial photography again.

    Course of Study
    ECAL Photography

    Tutors
    Joel Vacheron

  • Into the Flow - Liquidity and Subjectivity

    Vilutis, Justinas

    ECAL

    2017

    ECAL, 2017

    Into the flow liquidity and subjectivity 813 1

    Abstract
    Collection can be made and archived through a certain type of organising method - to stay ordered, become useful for public and provide information to the people that could regenerate the context and create new things. In this context, archive could also mean, an everlasting, tangible and also intangible bridge through the past - present - future, always there for us. Jacques Derrida rightly argues that the archive “opens out the future” and never ends, even if it was long ago left to us as an encapsulated unit, because: “ The archivist produces more archive, and that is why the archive is never closed.”

    Course of Study
    ECAL Photography

    Tutors
    Joel Vacheron

    File
    9b2538ffee63a666a461ebbc89824e90.pdf

  • The tarot

    Douglas, Calum

    ECAL

    2017

    ECAL, 2017

    Image 814 1

    Abstract
    "We are as gods and might as well get used to it. So far, remotely done power and glory as via government, big business, formal education, church has succeeded to the point where gross obscure actual gains. In response to this dilemma and to these gains a realm of intimate, personal power is developing power of the individual to conduct his own education, find his own inspiration, shape his own environment, and share his adventure with whoever is interested." For hundreds of years the tarot have been used as a form of clairvoyance. The new age movements have shifted its meanings and methods and diluted it to a form of fortune telling. But when we explore the genesis of the cards we see that the cards can actually be used for the present. A question is asked and the cards can be deciphered to gather a better insight into the event or issue. With this in mind I wish to use the cards as a method of research, reassigning the meanings and symbolism to new philosophies and events that at first may seem distant and unrelated but with methods such as non linear thinking I wish to create a new method of researching that applies to modern subjects such as the internet, post truth and the dark arts.

    Course of Study
    ECAL Photography

    Tutors
    tarot as reserch

    File
    11075e4a007a0c61e9d2bcdec6c2daf4.pdf

  • How the archival methodology affects visual arts?

    Park, Shin Young

    ECAL

    2017

    ECAL, 2017

    How the archival methodology affects visual arts 815 3
    How the archive methodology affects contemporary visual arts 815 2

    Abstract
    Archive is one of the main characteristics in the modern era that created as much by state organizations and institutions as by individuals and groups. For the huge amount of information including images are filled with our society, the proper archive, document, arrangement, and classification became much more crucial aspect. As the same data can get totally different meaning and value in a specific context, images can also get a new stance depending on its contexts. In the digital media era which daily life is overwhelmed by all types of visual culture, it is a crucial property that dealing with extensive visual data - including founded images on the internet - such as archiving and rearrange in each purpose. Through this research, I would like to focus on the archive methodology in visual arts field. Actually over recent years, there are several exhibitions and art works which have archive format and this sort of approaches appear more than ever. First I will start from the origin of the term as archive and discuss how it developed. And especially about the meaning of the archive and documentation in the contemporary art scene, the research will be based on the theory of Jacques Derrida and the Hal Foster. The cases of the artistic processes and the exhibitions will be analyzed to show how the archival approach affects to art scene. Additionally, discussion will be developed how the new technology affects to archival methodology; the interrelation between the digital archiving as an artistic practice and the curating approaches. - Why the archive matters now? - How the archival approach affects contemporary visual art scene? - How the archival methodology became crucial aspect? - How the new technology affects the way of archive? - What to do with today's big data including image sources through archival methodology?

    Course of Study
    ECAL Photography

    Tutors
    Joël Vacheron

    File
    8cde559ee3b9ad8180b58ea9a24ad481.pdf

  • Visual representation of the financial world through objects

    Gomez, Bastien

    ECAL

    2017

    ECAL, 2017

    Image 817 1

    Abstract
    Still lifes and films : A visual representation of the financial world through objects

    Course of Study
    ECAL Photography

    Tutors
    Joel Vacheron

    File
    91ff836fd2458a0311a2405edda56a4e.pdf

  • Potted plants in our homes

    Reuter, Jakob

    ECAL

    2017

    ECAL, 2017

    Image 818 1

    Abstract
    In one’s collection or archive - collected materials mixed in a certain arrangement consisted with visuals and tangibles, fine curation and lastly, subjective memory / narrative take important roles to complete the whole term and condition. In my point of view, from personal, small scale to large institution or organization in the context of collection and archive, it shares the same principle.

    Course of Study
    ECAL Product Design

    Tutors
    Anniina Koivu, Brynjar Sigur∂arson

    File
    8302afd2bd2fedfa9b0d1bb87c5fa5d0.pdf

  • Online Life Becomes Art

    Hiraldo Voleau, Karla

    ECAL

    2017

    ECAL, 2017

    Abstract
    After computers came into wide use back in the 90’s, and after everyone in the world became connected and online, the whole world has changed in so many ways that it is impossible to list every aspect of life that has been transformed by them (computers). However, if we concentrate on art, we can easily observe what has changed. Art has indeed also gone digital, and new forms of art has emerged: the art that could be only understood and experienced online. I am particularly interested in the artists that played along with the over exposition of individual’s private lives, and used that fact to create a new poetic digital language. Everyone was suddenly sharing their most intimate details and showing their personality, expressing their true self. Through blog posts, images, coding, forums, videos, animations, etc. One could have a double life on the web, and today more than ever. How important is the truthfullness of the online avatar ? Which identity is more truthfull, the real one or the online one ? What is the social meaning behind artists using their private online live ?

    Course of Study
    ECAL Photography

    Tutors
    Joel Vacheron, Ann-Christin Bertrand

    File
    e3d0785eb1bc2b6cfa7478f273a3187a.pdf

  • The Language of Objects in Still Life

    Sandahl, Simone

    ECAL

    2017

    ECAL, 2017

    The language of objects in still life 821 3
    The language of objects in still life 821 4
    The language of objects in still life 821 5

    Abstract
    The language of objects depicted in imagery helps us understand the world in which we live. Just as we grow up learning to speak a language, we are brought up to learn the language of objects. From when we are born we learn about the objects that surround us. First its seeing the shape, then the color and later we learn to understand its 3 dimensionality and texture. Later we gain the ability to grasp objects, and by putting objects together we slowly start to structure our first visual language - stories.

    Course of Study
    ECAL Photography

    Tutors
    Joël Vacheron

    File
    11f8c3f33cfa4d3b44eb35adb0497685.pdf

  • The History of Sleep

    Lippert, Jana Marlene

    ECAL

    2017

    ECAL, 2017

    Abstract
    Sleep researchers today can still not exactly explain why we sleep. What they agree on is its recreational function for the immune, skeletal, muscular and nervous systems as well as for the brain. In todays society good sleep became an obsession. Just as many areas of our lives undergo optimization, sleep too gets a lot of attention. There are plenty of guidebooks, apps, special lights, sound machines, not to speak of a great variety of mattresses and beds that are all promising a better if not perfect sleep. My memoire looks at the history of sleep, societal specialties, behavior and changing sleep patterns. Sociology, archeology and history are my main fields of research, while I am only slightly touching the medical field. My study aims at giving an overview at the evolution of sleep in western societies, trying to understand how historical changes influenced sleep behaviors till today and what we can learn from it. Is design actually a tool that can cater to our modern sleep obsession or is it a field that is already over designed and thus should be left alone?

    Course of Study
    ECAL Product Design

    Tutors
    Anniina Koivu, Brynjar Sigurdarson

  • Meaning of personal creative exersise

    Kojima, Kohei

    ECAL

    2017

    ECAL, 2017

    Meaning of personal creative exersise 834 1

    Abstract
    Owning, collecting, archiving, indexing, labelling, foldering, cataloging and categorizing - either it is related with micro daily routine ; such as arranging your salt, pepper, paprika powder and etc. in a certain order on your kitchen shelves, or a macro subject such as constructing an architecture of your past artworks for a gallery with curating manner, and from personal petty collection to prestigious library, there comes one singular pattern as the principle and also the conclusion.

    Course of Study
    ECAL Product Design

    Tutors
    Koivu Anniina, Brynjar Sigurðarson

    File
    3fb28932ab96ce0e7a9867f536f2428f.pdf

  • Textil in der Architektur. Zu den heutigen räumlichen und atmosphärischen Qualitäten von

    Schumann, Marie

    HSLU D&K

    2017

    HSLU D&K, 2017

    Abstract
    Textil ist ein alltägliches, körperliches Material, das durch seine Eigenschaften und Qualitäten im Gegensatz zur gebauten Architektur steht. Doch das dieses Material die Sinne anspricht, Körperbezüge und Atmosphäre im Raum schafft, macht es in der Architektur zu einem wichtigen Faktor. Warum und durch welche Form dies geschieht, soll in der vorliegenden Arbeit zu Beginn durch eine architekturhistorische Untersuchung, einen Einblick in Raumtheorie und der menschlichen Wahrnehmung darin durchleuchtet werden. Es folgen eine theoretische sowie phänomenologische Betrachtung auf die Bildung von Atmosphären und deren Auswirkung auf den Raum. Später folgt eine Betrachtung von Beispielen aus der architektonischen Praxis, die vielseitige Möglichkeiten des textilen Einsatzes aufzeigen und spannende, wichtige Merkmale des Materials herausstellen. Durch diese verschiedenen Betrachtungen wird festgestellt, dass Textil als Raumkomponente aufgrund seiner Eigenschaften und seines Körperbezugs zum primären Element werden kann und den Dialog zwischen Mensch und Architektur enorm fördert.

    Course of Study
    HSLU Master Design

    Tutors
    Dr. Dagmar Johanna Steffen, Isabel Rosa Müggler Zumstein, Brigitt Egloff

  • The Truth about Marie Antoinette

    Liistro, Serena

    HSLU D&K

    2017

    HSLU D&K, 2017

    Image 594 1
    Image 594 2

    Abstract
    We all know Marie Antoinette as the most spoiled and spendthrift queen in the history of Europe, so regardless of the problem of folks’ hunger to pronounce the sentence "If they have no bread, let them eat the croissants". While Marie Antoinette was not the perfect queen, it is also true that she found himself too young to rule over a nation which wasn’t hers and that actually never welcomed her completely. Her Austrian origins, her naivety and too many false friends at court led her soon to become the target of the people and of the French nobility. The marriage problems caused her a depression which she will try to appease through the sprees we all know. When Marie Antoinette switches to a more sober lifestyle and tries to settle the French public debt, she has already become the scapegoat of the French Revolution. Nobody knows she was a loving mother who deeply respected her husband and a generous woman whose naivety was betrayed by many false friends. I would like to tell the story of Marie Antoinette through an illustrated interactive story in order to show the hidden side of this fascinating and controversial iconic character of the history. The project is still at its beginnings. Through many books and documentaries I’m reserching the most important information, while I’m working on the visual aspects of the project.

    Course of Study
    HSLU Master Design

    Tutors
    Paolo Friz

    File
    cca4762e7128a1dfcb5f18eac20948c4.pdf

  • The Red Thread or how not to loose track ?

    Stiefel, Axelle

    HSLU D&K

    2017

    HSLU D&K, 2017

    Image 728 1

    Abstract
    The Red Thread is inspired by this singular mark – a red line – one finds on a classical kitchen towel. You find this line on a piece of linen fabric everywhere around the world, it appears in many cultures. Why not let the linen be as it is, unmarked? Perhaps because a mark holds the same function as a name, it differentiate. It is not any piece of linen. It is what I have named it for. Before it’s function, lies the fact that we acknowledge its existence. First, we recognise, then we differentiate. What’s left to do next but repeat? My aim in naming my project « The Red Thread » is to consciously implement a none-innovative element in a highly innovative driven culture with innovative art. The Red Thread functions as a fictive character wandering through a world that appears to be out of control. It allows me to track my motive with certain obsession while looking at things cooly, recreating an environment that I find enabling a sort of filiation. Taken as a generative principle, the way I care about the Red Thread is part of reality-making. Through The Red Thread I can travel in time – sidewise – without loosing track.

    Course of Study
    HSLU Master Design

    Tutors
    The Red Thread

    File
    e2dcf39a39b7ff497bb1cae09c28857d.pdf

  • Eingewandertes Gemüse

    Chen, Lihu

    HSLU D&K

    2017

    HSLU D&K, 2017

    Abstract
    Meine Master These hat mit dem eingewanderten Gemüse in Schweiz zu tun. Das Gemüse spielt nach wie vor eine vorwiegende Rolle bei der Ernährung, welches Gemüse überhaupt in Schweiz eingewandert war? Wie war es in Schweiz eingewandert worden? Niemand dürfte diese Frage definieren. Wie kann der Ausländer der Sprachbarriere in der Schweiz die Kochrezept des Gemüses effektiv verstehen? Wie kann seine Geschichten mit dem visuellem Symbol effektiv darstellen ? Wie kann seine Esskultur in der Schweiz im Alltag vermitteln? Aufgrund dieser Fragen forsche ich meines Thema im Bereich von Graphikdesign.

    Course of Study
    HSLU Master Design

    Tutors
    Robert Bossart

  • IN- between

    Tavcar, Hana

    HSLU D&K

    2017

    HSLU D&K, 2017

    Abstract
    The following thesis will result in an interactive illustrated publication that explores the frameworks of the idea of a non-place in association with the established terms space and place. Space A continuous area or expanse which is free, available, or unoccupied. The dimensions of height, depth, and width within which all things exist and move. Place A particular position, point, or area in space; a location. Meanwhile the public space is possible to conceptualize as very particular, set around specific boundaries, social, economic, physical or ideological it can also be understood as an anonymous abstract borderless area. The question remains if the same could be said for the notion of 'place’. I recognized in the French sociologists Marc Augé’s definition of non-places the same absence as in the (second) notion of the term space that differentiates a space from a place. The dictionary definition links a ‘place’ to very particular constellations of objects, impressions, perspectives etc. meanwhile it denies the term space of any relations with a meaningful coordinate. In my creative research I intend to look for the missing x of non-places in the equation of space to place. I will make illustrations that will somehow to speak of the role of the non-places in society, why they are important, who uses them and why etc. I will borrow motives from society, culture and everyday life.

    Course of Study
    HSLU Master Design

    Tutors
    Paolo Friz

  • What is love?

    Aurin, Margret

    HSLU D&K

    2017

    HSLU D&K, 2017

    Abstract
    What is love? Dies mag ein der größten Fragen im Leben jedes Einzelnen und der Menschheit zu sein. Eine Frage aus der keine konkrete Antwort resultiert, da es viele Arten von Liebe gibt und somit der Begriff Liebe nur der Oberbegriff ist für eine Sache die in sich verschachtelt erscheint. Ich möchte mich 100 Tage mit dem Thema Liebe beschäftigen und Geschichten erzählen von Menschen unterschiedlichen Alters und kultureller Prägung, sowie unterschiedlichen Gesellschaftsschichten zum Thema Liebe und deren Verständnis. Weiterhin werde ich die Liebe nach wissenschaftlichen Methoden analysieren, globale Statistiken zu Rate zu ziehen und den Versuch wagen das Mysterium Liebe an einzelnen Eckpunkten greifbarer zu machen. Das Endprodukt wird eine Sammlung in Buchform von einer Kombination aus Illustration und Einzelgeschichten, Hintergrundwissen und Statements über die Liebe. Das Buch zielt nicht darauf ab eine definitive Antwort auf die Frage „What is love?“ zu geben, sondern vielmehr das Spektrum aufzuzeigen was Liebe ist und inwiefern der Begriff Liebe über die Jahre und in unterschiedlichen Kulturen definiert wird.

    Course of Study
    HSLU Master Design

    Tutors
    Paolo Friz

    File
    35fc924286125c727fc3bdd738fc0e9e.docx

  • Anuvad

    Khalsa, Chhail

    HSLU D&K

    2017

    HSLU D&K, 2017

    Anuvad 763 1

    Abstract
    ANUVAD Anuvad is the Hindi term for translate. Because this project involves transalting indian crafts using technology. During my final Bachelgraduation project, I worked with a new prototype printing technology developed at Hochschule Luzern, Lucerne. My project brief involved with me working first hand with this technology to develop innovative surfaces, treatments and textures. The idea here was to create effects using the machine that could not be recreated using conventional printing techniques. The end result of my project was a collection of successful explorations which clearly describe the potential of the machine and this was done using both regular and smart ink pigments. Working on this project allowed me to explore and understand the world of applied design research. The machine challenges all our known boundaries in print design and allows us to open up to a plethora of possibilities in terms of application of form and colour onto a surface. The idea to combine smart inks along with a new technology opened up a new direction which also has innumerable possibilities a lot of which are also unexplored yet. This only ignited my curiosity in the field of smart textiles further. The concepts are further explained as follows: SmartCraft: India has an amazing repertoire of crafts and handcrafted textiles, and this project would explore a new direction by combining crafts with smart materials. This would involve working towards marrying crafts and smart materials seamlessly to come up with interesting fabrics and products. Indian crafts have very strong aesthetics for themselves; the idea here would be to see if we can successfully combine Indian aesthetics with new-age materials, in a way that they can become a part of each other and work in coherence to perform a particular function. One example of this synchrony would be the following idea: The fabric in the picture is a Bhujodi shawl, a very famous woven textile craft from Bhujodi, a village in Bhuj, Gujarat in the western part of India. This craft is basically a technique of extra weft woven on a base which is primarily wool. The patterns are made by counting the warp threads to weave in an extra weft on a hand-loom. One of the ideas to create smart textiles using this craft would be to weave conductive threads into the fabric and replace the mirrors with LEDs. Since this is a mainly handwoven craft, the pattern could be altered to form a continous circuit using conductive threads which would perform the function of lighting up the LED lights. This although is just one such example of combining the two concepts. This can be done using many other craft possibilities which India can offer.

    Course of Study
    HSLU Master Design

    Tutors
    Brigitte Egloff, Isabel Rosa Muggler

    File
    86effae4c6ba44ade5d2590b593fc27f.jpg

  • Title Unknown

    Lüdi, Justine

    HEAD

    2017

    HEAD, 2017

    Image 678 1

    Abstract
    Le transhumanisme est un mouvement de pensée qui prône l’utilisation et le développement des technologies et des sciences pour « améliorer la condition humaine ». Bien que mouvement techno-positif, le transhumanisme est souvent critiqué ou génère de la peur chez les technopessimistes. Cette peur se retrouve aussi chez le grand public, principalement par le biais du divertissement (surtout le cinéma de science-fiction), sous forme de question éthique/bioéthique: jusqu’où l’Homme peut-il aller ? En rebondissant sur cette question, l’Homme est-il (en droit de jouer à) Dieu ? Dans beaucoup d’essais contre le mouvement, les sceptiques, philosophes, critiques, journalistes, etc., définissent le transhumanisme comme une nouvelle doctrine ou une religion.

    Course of Study
    HEAD Master Media Design

    Tutors
    Nicolas Nova

    File
    80d5cc7d21d710da111994c020723fc6.pdf

  • Smartphone: link or gap creator?

    Monnier, Mélissa

    HEAD

    2017

    HEAD, 2017

    Abstract
    My research is based on users interviews and is about trying to discover how is the smartphone used within the family and more specifically between pre-teens and their parents.

    Course of Study
    HEAD Master Media Design

    Tutors
    Lysianne Léchot-Hirt

  • Conversation in the era of autocomplete

    Buenerd, Mathilde

    HEAD

    2017

    HEAD, 2017

    Abstract
    Autocomplete is becoming more and more assistive, to a point that it could be viewed as a recommender system for writing, and indeed, for social relationships. Permitted by complex algorithms, this transformation raises many problems : language regularization, "filter bubble" effect, privacy issues. How could design bring solutions to these problems ? In this paper, I wish to investigate through speculative enactments what autocomplete brings to conversation : what is frustrating, enjoyable or challenging ? The goal is to extract principles for designing autocomplete systems.

    Course of Study
    HEAD Master Media Design

    Tutors
    Nicolas Nova

    File
    74eb914a8f38ef180dce0c744fa16f72.pdf

  • Parametricity, Modularity, and Abstraction in Design

    Marquet, Alexis

    HEAD

    2017

    HEAD, 2017

    Abstract
    Good practices (parametricity, modularity, abstraction) have been used for decades in engineering. Each of theses habits has been used with the purpose of reusing previous developments in mind. It is progressively starting to be used in many fields, yet design seems to be indifferent to it. Looking specifically at the stage design in electronic music, I try to understand why that is, and why creators mostly work in a monolithic manner. Very little research has been done on stage design in this subculture, when it is a type of performance experienced by many.

    Course of Study
    HEAD Master Media Design

    Tutors
    Daniel Sciboz

  • L'école buissonnière

    Diaz, Clément

    HEAD

    2017

    HEAD, 2017

    L ecole buissonniere 723 1

    Abstract
    Si par cognition il est entendu la faculté d’acquérir de la connaissance, un procédé de design développé en corrélation d’un raisonnement éducatif deviendrait processus de design cognitif. Selon ce postulat, "l'école buissonnière" cherche à poser une nouvelle fois la question de l'éducation. Issus d'une remise en question des préceptes de l'éducation nouvelle, notamment portés par les travaux du pédagogue allemand Friedrich Fröbel cet écrit s'apparente un cours essai sur la place du design au sein des procédés d’éducation par le jeu depuis 1835 et la création des jardins d'enfants jusqu'à aujourd'hui.

    Course of Study
    head_espaces_communication

    Tutors
    Etienne Bernard

  • CITYCYBERHUMUS

    Caillier, Coline

    HEAD

    2017

    HEAD, 2017

    Citycyberhumus 724 1

    Abstract
    What roles for neglected urban areas in urban design? Inspired by the words of Richard Brautigan, and his cybernetic ecology, this master thesis addresses the question of urban ecology, and the design that comes from this ecosystem. Within the porous spaces, what are the urban wastelands, what are the possibilities for a design centered not on the user but on the territory? Is it possible today to create a non-anthropocentric design?

    Course of Study
    HEAD Master Media Design

    Tutors
    Nicolas Nova

    File
    87c80defb8088b19fb87d2d9115589d0.pdf

  • Attentive technology

    Racsko, Julia

    HEAD

    2017

    HEAD, 2017

    Attentive technology 725 1
    Attentive technology 725 2
    Attentive technology 725 3

    Abstract
    The observation motivating me to write Attentive technology is that the overabundance of information available from our devices at any given moment turned attention into a scarcity, and a very significant proportion of this attention is consumed by different screens. As devices get smaller, they can be embedded in more spaces and situations. Though we often leave desktop computers at their own dedicated place, their pocket-sized versions come with us everywhere, and even smaller ones are starting to claim space on, and perhaps even in our bodies as wearables. As measured by numerous studies, we see and touch the screens of our smartphones probably more than any other object or person for that matter. What are the consequences of the smartphone’s newly gained centrality in our lives and and how could we instead build self-control and sustainability of attention through digital design? The first part of this research looks at different psychological aspects of attention, the strong tendency to engage in interferences (which are often some kind of information), our relationship with information as a reward and a powerful need, and a model to explain strategies of gathering information. The second part is about how the human mind exists in the attention economy, which requires digital products to gain as much time and mental energy of their users as possible in order to succeed. This inspired popular methods for exploiting the limits of our attention capacity, affecting our ability to single-task (experience flow, be bored, write, etc) and our free choice of what we pay attention to. In the third part, I will try to imagine an alternative vision where the success metrics of attention will help us have more self-control over our attention, and make our focus more sustainable. One part will consist of interviews of digital designers already aware of similar issues in order to learn from their approach, and designers who specifically create mobile applications to have a better idea how to work with qualitative goals in mind. The other part would be a visual representation of attention that shows its relational nature instead of using it as a currency. The learnings will hopefully inspire the master project.

    Course of Study
    HEAD Master Media Design

    Tutors
    Daniel Pinkas

    File
    bc372e73d87ef13c0bb09ee7771aded0.pdf

  • Impact of interface design in electronic music instrument

    Longchamp, Yann

    HEAD

    2017

    HEAD, 2017

    Impact of interface design in electronic music instrument 726 1

    Abstract
    The field of research that I explore through this thesis is about interfaces design in electronic music instruments. I identify the elements of interfaces design that impact the use of electronic instruments and what kind of innovations that bring to musical creation. I focus my work on the interaction between human and machine and I highlight the strategies and solutions brought by designers, musicians and engineers.

    Course of Study
    HEAD Master Media Design

    Tutors
    Joël Vacheron

    File
    10fa41d5c10b24b598e12c4d4b9f7798.pdf

  • Humanoïdes

    Johnsen, Melina

    HEAD

    2017

    HEAD, 2017

    Humanoides 737 1

    Abstract
    Trois sculptures sur scène. Nous ne sommes pas au musée, mais bien au théâtre, à la première du spectacle Hérodiade de Martha Graham, le 30 Octobre 1944 à l’auditoire Elizabeth Sprague Coolidge, à Washington DC. Pour faire la scénographie de son spectacle, elle fait appel à Isamu Noguchi pour réaliser les trois sculptures qui investissent la scène. Les motivations de Martha Graham et d’Isamu Noguchi quant à leur choix scénographique sur le spectacle Hérodiade n’ont, à ma connaissance, jamais été évoqués dans les ouvrages que j’ai répertorié. De manière générale, lorsque l’on parle des scénographies des deux collaborateurs, le terme décor est utilisé pour les qualifier. Cependant, il semble être inadéquat et est remis en cause dans ce mémoire. Isamu Noguchi réalise trois sculptures dont l’essence n’a pas été transformée et leur confie en plus de leur état-premier un rôle d’ordre fonctionnel, sans pour autant en faire des objets, au service des besoins scénographiques de Martha Graham.

    Course of Study
    head_espaces_communication

    Tutors
    Alexandra Midal

    File
    8bfb058e697d654eafcd910c95e8b32f.jpg

  • Untitled

    Bui, Quynh

    HEAD

    2017

    HEAD, 2017

    Untitled 765 1
    Untitled 765 2
    Untitled 765 3

    Abstract
    During the mid 1800s, jeans were originally designed in America for blue collar laborers constructed to withstand the daily grind. Today, jeans have become a fashion staple worn by every social class with no distinction between sex or age group and worn on all occasions. Being ubiquitous as it is, jeans once stood for more than just a comfortable piece of clothing. It once bore the symbol of youth rebellion, an anti-fashion statement that was not accepted in conventional society. It became a uniform for the counter-culture youth to protest against restrictions from parents, societal values, and demonstrated freedom of rights and sexual stereotypes. This thesis focuses on the history of how jeans became the symbol of youth and its social impact during the 1950's-1960's in America and investigates the symbolisms of jeans in modern America. What relations do jeans have on a political or societal standpoint? In what fashion does the 50's-60's and modern counter-culture youth compare and differ? Does symbolism exist in denim in modern America and what do they represent?

    Course of Study
    head_design_mode

    Tutors
    Jill Gasparina

    File
    983a9e561f584e9d851f700d3540f75f.jpg

  • Le selfie masculin à la salle de sport

    Beltramo, Aurélien

    HEAD

    2017

    HEAD, 2017

    Abstract
    Création et jeux d’images de la masculinité dans la pratique sportive en Occident. Cette essai se situe au croisement d’un questionnement iconographique et sociologique au travers de l’analyse d’une banque d’images de selfies d’hommes durant leur pratique sportive en salle de musculation/fitness récoltées sur Instagram. Il s’agit de voir comment sont construite ces images de façon plastique, et de voir à quoi ces images se réfèrent historiquement dans l’histoire de l’art et de la représentation du corps masculin (canons de beauté de l’antiquité, Renaissance, body builder, etc…) À cela suit une recherche sociologique sur la production de ces images par rapport au notions de masculinité et de virilité pour comprendre ce que disent ces images contemporaines sur ces notions.

    Course of Study
    head_design_mode

    Tutors
    Jill Gasparina

  • Bringing Distance Learning Students (Closer) Together

    Schneider, Elsa

    HEAD

    2017

    HEAD, 2017

    Bringing distance learning students closer together 745 1
    Bringing distance learning students closer together 745 2

    Abstract
    Exploring the potentials and impacts of smart objects and tangible user interfaces on social presence in order to improve distance learning students' experiences.

    Course of Study
    HEAD Master Media Design

    Tutors
    Lysianne Léchot-Hirt, Gaëlle Molinari

    File
    c52b1573c584020b525d8fddaa8e61b6.pdf

  • Easy to Learn, Hard to Master

    Gulizia, Ivan

    HEAD

    2017

    HEAD, 2017

    Abstract
    Comment concevoir des outils, méthodes et interfaces qui permettraient à des débutants de s’exprimer à travers la création d’un univers vidéoludique ?

    Course of Study
    HEAD Master Media Design

    Tutors
    Nicolas Nova

    File
    7b98ba3ef513104b9dbafa74ae298540.pdf

  • Transcendence Aesthetics- Bruder Klaus Chapel

    Tseng, Shih-Hua

    HEAD

    2017

    HEAD, 2017

    Transcendence aesthetics bruder klaus chapel 750 1
    Transcendence aesthetics bruder klaus chapel 750 2
    Transcendence aesthetics bruder klaus chapel 750 3

    Abstract
    How do designers in the visual field engage a sense of spirituality or inject transcendental quality into their work. Is it simply achieved with object or space's visual composition? Traditionally a transcendental moment is being associated spatially within religious build environment. However, through the study of the Bruder Klaus Chapel by architect Peter Zumthor, it suggests that such phenomenal arrive beyond religious constrain but an important aspect of the designer/architect's working method and his way of forming ideas, his design process. The process seems appeal strongly through his direct and physical engagement. This lead to an interesting question on whether computer generated work has the sensual ability to give us a deeper and enriched experience beyond visual stimulation. My goal is to proof that the phenomenal of transcendence experience achieved through a work of design arrive when our different senses are being engaged, and this sensitivity may only be realized through the designer's personal bodily engagement during the developing process.

    Course of Study
    head_espaces_communication

    Tutors
    Sebastien Quequet

    File
    4e93718b52ce3a40d229564e808eee65.pdf

  • The ocean at home

    Burnier, Lucile

    HEAD

    2017

    HEAD, 2017

    Image 756 1
    Image 756 2

    Abstract
    Au tournant des années 1850-60, l’Angleterre puis l’Europe sont frappés par un engouement pour les aquariums appelés l’ « aquarium-mania ». Comment un objet créé pour la science finit-il par être récupéré par des hommes de Théâtre et devient une des attractions phares de l’Exposition Universelle de Paris en 1900 ?

    Course of Study
    head_espaces_communication

    Tutors
    Midal Alexandra

  • Reading Between Faces

    Revuelta Ayuso, Marta

    HEAD

    2017

    HEAD, 2017

    Image 757 1
    Reading between faces 757 2

    Abstract
    More and more, governments and private companies use advanced computer vision and machine learning techniques to decipher people’s intimate traits. Facial metrics are extensively used for affective and psychological analysis and algorithms are now reaching an accuracy such that it allows for facial analysis-based commercial products. This research takes into account recent studies and evolution of artificial intelligence in the domain of facial recognition and profiling where algorithms are programmed to discern particular behaviour or psychological patterns from the human faces such as trustworthiness, IQ, sexual orientation, etc. From here on and with the assumption that our faces do not lie, can design explore and expose the use of softwares analysing and profiling the behaviours and psychological traits of humans, and reveal their potential drifts and risks? The association of technologies like facial recognition, AI, facial analysis and profiling and big data allows a computational categorisation and surveillance of human beings, raising questions about privacy, individual freedoms and ethics. I am studying different scientific articles and academic research papers about machine learning and computer based facial analysis, as well as considering commercial products and softwares, their applications and many appropriations by private companies, the drifts in their usages.

    Course of Study
    HEAD Master Media Design

    Tutors
    Daniel Pinkas

    File
    88ce94368111604087fbc75a00565d5f.pdf

  • Light for Drama

    Milesi, Alicja

    HEAD

    2017

    HEAD, 2017

    Abstract
    Two hundred years ago Richard Wagner created a new theater experience using light to merge the elements of his new genre musical dramas. The achieved effect would eventually prove to be the inspiration for performance productions for generation to come, right up to and including today’s modern cinema. A few short years later Adolphe Appia, built upon Wagner’s original ideas. In his staging of Wagner’s theater pieces, he used light to integrate music, actor and space. But it was contemporary theater producer, Josef Svoboda, with the advantage of modern technologies, who would fully explore the potential of theatre lighting in Wagner’s original works. Light became an emotion, an object, an actor and a space. Lighting is a universal reference of theatrical staging over the centuries. What is light and why is it important to get to know lighting’s properties? How lighting techniques will influence the future of theatre staging?

    Course of Study
    head_espaces_communication

    Tutors
    Damien Dellile

  • Le Coyotisme

    Cnockaert, Jean-Marc

    HEAD

    2017

    HEAD, 2017

    Le coyotisme 761 1
    Le coyotisme 761 2

    Abstract
    Le Coyotisme : Wile E. Coyote, personnage de cartoon, genius et designer de l'échec. Cette recherche est consacrée à Wile E. Coyote, personnage du cartoon Bip-Bip & Coyote (Wile E. Coyote & The Road Runner en VO) qui n'a qu'un objectif, attraper un oiseau nommé Bip-Bip. Au fil des épisodes, il n'aura de cesse de tenter d'atteindre son but par le biais de plans qu'il design, ou de gadgets fournis par ACME Corporation qu'il utilise en quantité. Dans tous les cas le résultat est toujours le même, l'échec. Par une analyse des diverses tentatives du coyote, il s'agit de déterminer de quelles influences sa façon de concevoir des solutions à sa quête découlent, le contexte contemporain à ce dessin animé étant l'Amérique des années 1950 et 1960. De comprendre le rôle de l'échec dans sa pratique de designer et d’émettre pourquoi pas l’hypothèse d’un concept appeler le Coyotisme.

    Course of Study
    head_espaces_communication

    Tutors
    Alexandra Midal

    File
    29f31c3bd5c0c4690fced29b8acf01ba.pdf

  • McLuhan Geisha

    Hajj, Rita

    HEAD

    2017

    HEAD, 2017

    Mcluhan geisha 762 3
    Mcluhan geisha 762 1
    Mcluhan geisha 762 2

    Abstract
    In 1968, Cerebrum, an underground entertainment space, was founded in New York City by the 24-year-old Ruffin Jr. Cooper along with 24 other member-associates - dropouts, artists, freaks, rebels, iconoclasts, musicians, longhairs – and designed by the architect John Storyk. It was known as the "McLuhan geisha house:” McLuhan referring to Marshall McLuhan, a Canadian intellectual who studied in the mid-20th century the effect of the communication technologies on men, and geisha house, referring to the house of the Japanese female entertainers. This essay questions the nature of this space based on the McLuhan Geisha expression, as well as the relation between the space and cerebrum; noting that cerebrum is the principal part of the brain responsible for the integration of the sensory and the neural functions. Looking at this case study from its social hippie context of the 60s, the writing also explores how this collective of artists and designers manipulated the participants’ senses in order to reach their psyche and free their minds. Through the architecture as well as the use of electronics and multimedia tools, performances, gadgets, balloons, bubbles, kaleidoscopes and toys during each session, a mind-alteration as well as sexual pleasures took place, educating patrons about their environment.

    Course of Study
    head_espaces_communication

    Tutors
    Damien Delille

  • Museum of fictions

    Pizzini, Eleonora

    HEAD

    2017

    HEAD, 2017

    Museum of fictions 764 1
    Museum of fictions 764 2
    Museum of fictions 764 3

    Abstract
    Museum of fictions presents a new kind of museum that uses storytelling to give shape to the objects of its collection: what seems to be false can be true, and what seems to be unbelievable becomes believable. At the base, the careful use of the discipline of storytelling. Museum of fictions analyzes the Museum of Jurassic Technology in Los Angeles and his permanent collection, discovering an original US genealogy of museums of fictions, going to rebuild the complex relationship between wonder, reality and fiction from the first American museums.

    Course of Study
    head_espaces_communication

    Tutors
    Alexandra Midal

    File
    1fe2d4b76333f7345cc75d036bae7618.pdf

  • Insoumises

    Lafarge, Blanche

    HEAD

    2017

    HEAD, 2017

    Insoumises 766 1
    Insoumises 766 2
    Insoumises 766 3

    Abstract
    En novembre 1854, André Adolphe Eugène Disdéri, (1819-1889) photographe français né à Paris, dépose le brevet d’un procédé appelé « portraits-cartes de visite » qui permet d’imprimer plusieurs poses sur la même plaque photographique. Son invention réduit considérablement le prix des tirages et donne ainsi aux petits bourgeois l’occasion de se faire tirer le portrait. La carte de visite est un nouvel outil de communication appartenant aux mass-médias, qui fait son apparition dans le contexte d’une France en cours d’industrialisation, et qui par conséquent modifie les relations sociales entre les classes, et surtout les rapports entre le public et les célébrités. Grâce à la reproductibilité technique ainsi qu’à la réduction des coûts de la production photographique, les courtisanes parisiennes sont confrontées pour la première fois à la question du contrôle de leur image : les insoumises, ces prostituées non inscrites sur les registres de la police des moeurs, se servent allègrement de ce médium pour faire leur auto-promotion et agrandir leur clientèle, espérant par ce biais s’élever socialement et acquérir le statut de courtisane renommée. Qu’est-ce que la mise en scène d’une cour- tisane du XIXe siècle à Paris ? Ont-elles une place décisive dans la construction de leur image ? Comment construisent-elles un portrait dans le but de faire leur promotion sexuelle, et leur auto-promotion médiatique ? Comment se défendent-elles et profitent-elles des nouveaux médias de masse ? Je me demande dans ce mémoire si l’usage du portrait-carte par les demi-mondaines relève d’un assujettissement et d’un conditionnement à l’industrie de l’image érotique ou bien d’une maîtrise de la publicité au service d’une émancipation de la courtisane ?

    Course of Study
    head_espaces_communication

    Tutors
    Alexandra Midal

  • Mode et Piété

    Delaye Augagneur, Maxime

    HEAD

    2017

    HEAD, 2017

    Abstract
    Comment peut-on, aujourd'hui, se représenter la piété chrétienne occidentale au sein du vestiaire féminin ? Existe-t-il encore un rapport étroit entre le corps et Dieu en cherchant à répondre à des règles de vertus ? La foi religieuse, aussi impalpable soit-elle, transparait-elle sur notre corps ? Comment on peut incarner l’immatériel ? Peut-on mesurer sa vertu par un signe matériel ?

    Course of Study
    head_design_mode

    Tutors
    Audrey Teichmann

  • Rocking-chair angoissant

    Bily, Capucine

    HEAD

    2017

    HEAD, 2017

    Rocking chair angoissant 768 1

    Abstract
    On connait tous l’image du rocking-chair associé à la mère pour bercer son enfant, aux vieilles personnes, mais également aux cow-boys et fermiers américains. Objet à bascule de confort, de contemplation, de repos et de moments de discussions collectives, le rocking-chair possède pourtant une image plus sombre. Il est représenté angoissant et monstrueux dans les romans du maître de l’horreur Stephen King et dans le cinéma d’horreur notamment depuis le film Psycho (1960) d’Alfred Hitchcock. Cet essai propose de découvrir la chaise à bascule sous un angle mystérieux et singulier afin de comprendre ce qu’a pu au cours de l’histoire et du cinéma rendre cet objet angoissant.

    Course of Study
    head_espaces_communication

    Tutors
    Alexandra Midal

  • A Secret Story of Animation

    Norén, Marianne

    HEAD

    2017

    HEAD, 2017

    A secret story of animation 769 1
    A secret story of animation 769 2
    A secret story of animation 769 3

    Abstract
    In animation, Color is the most important visual element used to evoke empathy. Today´s leading studio, Pixar Animation, is known for specifically using a technique called Color Scripting when creating their stories. As a method used in pre-production, the Color Script lets artists develop a visual structure through color composition. By using the method, artists replaced traditional themes of fairytales, with social themes of society, which eventually was key when it came to placing Pixar at the top of the rankings. This thesis analyzes and dissects the method of the Color Script. What was created as a tool based on the idea of making people cry has transitioned into a commodity that possibly changes social ideologies bit by bit. How is that? In what way has the evolution of Color Scripts influenced the way the animated feature films are created today?

    Course of Study
    head_espaces_communication

    Tutors
    Etienne Bernard

  • NËOS, L'antre habité

    Vaillant, Maia

    HEAD

    2017

    HEAD, 2017

    Neos l antre habite 770 1
    Neos l antre habite 770 2

    Abstract
    Dans les années 60, Jacques Couëlle, architecte français, entreprend la réalisation de ses premières sculptures-habitées pour le village de Castellaras-le-Neuf. Ces habitats de par leurs apparences extérieures sont souvent assimilés à des grottes ou à des architectures troglodytiques. Ce mémoire tend à démontrer que les sculptures-habitées ne sont pas de simples illusions d’un habitat primitif, mais que ce sont des espaces transgressifs et autonomes qui découlent d’une observation et d’un rituel de création particulier prenant part à la vie quotidienne de celui qui y habite. En résulte alors la création d’un « espace-matière » où l’expérience du sensible est primordiale.

    Course of Study
    head_espaces_communication

    Tutors
    Sébastien Quéquet

  • Performer le mauvais genre au XIXème

    Rabot, Alice

    HEAD

    2017

    HEAD, 2017

    Abstract
    Au tournant du XIX-XXe siecle le phénomène du demi-monde incarné par des femmes appelée, grandes horizontales ou encore cocottes se construises comme des objets de fantasme dans une société corsetée par le moralisme. leur vie sulfureuse devient un sujet de curiosité publique qu’elles attisent en permanence pour atteindre la célébrité. Performeuses du mauvais genre évoluant dans la sphère du luxe, comment ces femmes spectacle deviendront des modèles dans l'art de plaire et une forme d'émancipation ?

    Course of Study
    head_design_mode

    Tutors
    Elisabeth Fischer

  • Le poids du sac à main

    Chéhab, Giulia Amelie

    HEAD

    2017

    HEAD, 2017

    Abstract
    Le sac de la femme est lourd et s’alourdit, d’un poids révélateur de son positionnement dans la société contemporaine. Quand le port de cette charge limite et déforme le corps, le paradoxe devient évident. Une première recherche vise à eclaircir les enjeux sociaux qui poussent la femme à un comportement douloureux, puis, une analyse du marché aide à savoir s’il existent des solutions à ce problème, ou s’il est possible d’en proposer.

    Course of Study
    head_design_mode

    Tutors
    Audrey Teichmann

  • Hortulan Voyage

    Hemmerijckx, Nina

    HEAD

    2017

    HEAD, 2017

    Abstract
    The relationship that mankind has with plants, gardens and the architecture related to them, is a long one. It is a long-lasting and complex history, with many cultural evolutions and opinions within it. In this thesis, the focus will be on the Winter Gardens of the 19th century in Great Britain and the relation this architectural typology has towards the creation of an artificial paradise. There is a longing to create the experience of an illusion, within this paradise. The growing plants and man-made forms were juxtaposed to create this artificial paradise1 . What can be understood by nature enclosed in a glass case? And where lies its origin? What can be understood by this artificial paradise? Where does this paradise come from? What precisely is this experience of an illusion in the context of this artificial paradise? How did the man-made forms encounter with the growing plants? And how were these man-made forms and plants used to create an experience of an illusion? I would like to investigate the questions: why and how does the Winter Garden in 19th century Great Britain represent the experience of an illusion? Somerleyton Hall, in Suffolk, Great Britain, from 1843-1862 is the case study that will be used to explore this. During this period, the estate belonged to Sir Morton Peto (1804-1889) and its Winter Garden was built by British sculptor and architect John Thomas (1813-1862). The specific analysis of this case study will offer a possible explanation to these questions, giving an overall frame and a thread throughout this thesis.

    Course of Study
    head_espaces_communication

    Tutors
    Sebastien QUÉQUET

    File
    55358bdd7c5fe15586bc1d43b96caecc.pdf

  • Le vil précieux dans le bijou contemporain

    Nguyen, Noëllie

    HEAD

    2017

    HEAD, 2017

    Le vil precieux dans le bijou contemporain 781 1
    Le vil precieux dans le bijou contemporain 781 2

    Abstract
    A partir des années 1950, des artistes (Georges Braque, Henri Laurens, Alexandre Calder) comme des créateurs indépendants ont fait évoluer la conception traditionnelle du bijou, tant dans ses formes que ses finitions. A partir des années 1960, on remarque un changement radical dans la fabrication des bijoux, notamment dans les matériaux utilisés. Les créateurs ont montré qu’un bijou n’était pas forcément signe de richesse, mais pouvait aussi communiquer une personnalité, indiquer un statut artistique, politique, culturel ou encore social. Il ne s’agit plus uniquement de parer un corps mais aussi de transmettre un message ou de véhiculer un concept. Le créateur n’est plus seulement tenu de faire un beau bijou portable, il peut s’exprimer au travers de sa création. Le porteur, quant à lui, achète le bijou en étant conscient de ces nouveaux enjeux esthétiques et conceptuels. Il affiche son identité personnelle et propage le discours du concepteur, auquel il adhère. Matière et objet du quotidien sont alors soit détournés et transformés pour ne plus qu’on les reconnaisse, soit utilisés tels quels pour devenir le sujet principal de l’œuvre. C’est ainsi que du papier de boucher devient parure de noce, contraste absolu entre la fraicheur de la mariée et la mort animale (Verena Sieber Fuchs), ou encore que des chaines et des pneumatiques de vélo sont transcendés en colliers (Noémie Doge). A travers ces bijoux, on voit l’extraordinaire possibilité qu’a le créateur de magnifier une matière ou un objet, de rendre précieux ce qui est ordinaire. Pour les bijoutiers contemporains, une autre manière de bouleverser les conventions de la bijouterie traditionnelle consiste à maltraiter, abîmer, ou cacher les matières dites précieuses. Ils ont expérimenté techniquement, par exemple en élaborant de nouveaux traitements de surface sur les métaux précieux, pour les rendre moins brillants (donc moins attirants ?), ou pour les rendre plus surprenants visuellement. Par ailleurs, le bijou contemporain est également influencé par une tendance de la mode qui consiste à déplacer la culture populaire vers le monde du luxe. Il est donc intéressant d’étudier la mutation du caractère précieux du bijou contemporain occidental et d’identifier les nombreux critères qui le définissent désormais.

    Course of Study
    head_design_mode

    Tutors
    Audrey Teichmann

  • L'uniforme dans les gangs japonais des années 1970

    Autié-Naty, Manon

    HEAD

    2017

    HEAD, 2017

    L uniforme dans les gangs japonais des annees 1970 783 1
    L uniforme dans les gangs japonais des annees 1970 783 2

    Abstract
    Je m’intéresse aux gangs japonais des années 70, plus largement aux uniformes et à l’image de l’adolescente en tenue d’écolière. L’uniforme a une place très importante dans ce pays. La population est « uniformisée » dès son plus jeune âge pour être « désuniformisée» le temps d’une courte pause à l’université et finir « réuniformisée » dans le milieu du travail. Les japonais jouent un rôle dans lequel l’uniforme est leur costume. Il est donc intéressant d’observer comment des groupes rebelles en marge se sont réappropriés ces normes vestimentaires en les mêlant à des éléments de leur occident rêvé, pour créer de nouvelles tenues, mais finalement toujours des uniformes, ceux de leurs gangs.

    Course of Study
    head_design_mode

    Tutors
    Elizabeth Fischer

    File
    f5401388daebe81ac4834a8b992bba4f.jpg

  • perception of map

    Kiyota, Naoyuki

    HEAD

    2017

    HEAD, 2017

    Abstract
    How does an artist make a work that is evocative of a specific place or territory? How do they go about this process when they want to tell a story that takes place in the space they are seeking to evoke? I think, examining the mapping through cartography and its numerous representation could happen to be the most powerful side-road for artists. For proof and research more deeply, I show some different representation of maps from different purpose. And, I use "Ammassalik wooden maps" which was made in Greenland, and work of Arakawa Shusaku as my main case study. Through the research of Arakawa's process and reason why he arrive at this thinking , I tried to find link between representation of map and his way of thinking of how to understand art work. After that, I propose what is one important thing for artists to do from my conclusion. To represent my thesis, I have chosen to make a film. It is just one way through which I could communicate my concept. I think the combination of images, sound, and movement more effectively conveys my argument. It is, after all, one of the roles of the artist and designer to make ideas more comprehensible to audiences and so I have chosen to use several different media and angles to make my point as clearly as possible.

    Course of Study
    head_espaces_communication

    Tutors
    Alexandra Midal

No search-result