JRDC ECRAN entrée

Greetings

Dear students of the Swiss Master in Design Programmes,
Dear professors, lecturers and academic staff



To conduct research was one of the major issues at stake when the Universities of Applied Science were integrated in the network of institutes for higher education in Switzerland. The reform of the Swiss higher education system sparked critical debates due to the predominantly applied tradition of Swiss design education, considered closer to “best practice” than to science. The implementation of the programmes of Master of Arts in Design generated even more controversy. The programmes targeted a «research oriented design approach». This research approach raised questions on the ways of integrating research in a Master level in the context of Swiss design, and what kind of professional career model this would open up. It was a major challenge to develop master programmes and successfully lead them through the international accreditation procedures.

Almost 10 years later, most of the basic questions were solved! Today, looking at all the Master in Design programmes offered by the Swiss Universities of Applied Science, we can see a high level of both a unique education in design skills and innovation as well as a distinctive way on how design practice is being questioned and discussed. This approach opened up new perspectives for the design discipline: it revealed how design produces new knowledge in its own right, by creating specific methods and processes. Be it «research through design», «research about design» or «research for design» – the design community as well as the academia now agree that design has fostered its own unique approach on how «research» can be defined and developed. It is founded not only on academic criteria, but more especially on practice-based processes and results, and a body of knowledge which incorporates design history. As a result, a broad range of design research activities have successfully emerged from our master programmes. Different design disciplines have developed their own approach to research and are recognised contributors to both culture and knowledge.

The Junior Research Conference (JRC) turned out to be a major player in the national dialogue on research in the design master programmes. The JRC acts today as a network — an annual performance indicator and a remarkable event that charts the steady progress of Master students in design research. Since the first JRC held in 2011, a panel of students have been presenting their master projects and carrying out workshops with their peers. One of the key principles governing the JRC is that the conference is organised by and for students, rather than being set up for institutional reasons. It provides an interesting insight into current projects and relevant topics, demonstrating processes and experiments, therefore raising novel questions showing the way forward in our educational institutions. Each year witnesses a rise in the quality of the projects which are shown to the audience. This presents a challenge to the lecturers, and testifies to the high educational standards that underscore the programmes. Ultimately, this drives design culture in Switzerland forward, ensuring the legitimacy of its contribution to the scientific community and of a successful practice-based profession.

Following the JRC events held in our fellow Universities of Applied Science in Design in Switzerland, it is our turn to have the pleasure of welcoming you at HEAD—Genève for the ninth Junior Research Conference. We are particularly pleased to welcome you to our new Campus, located in the Chatelaine district of Geneva. A large number of HEAD's study programmes will come together on this Campus, creating a centre of excellence in art and design and enabling the School to set up large-scale cultural events. The JRC will be hosted in Bâtiment H, a former factory which is now one of the three buildings of the Campus. On November 14th will take place a kick-off pre-conference focusing on potential career models and opportunities for our graduates in research. On November 15th, each University will present two masters projects from different design disciplines, and offer workshops led by the students. And at the end of the conference, we invite all participants to share a drink with us on our Campus.

We look forward to welcome you!

Anne-Catherine Sutermeister
Head of Research at HEAD—Genève

Program

PRE-CONFERENCE 14 NOV. 2018
Building H – Le Cube

PART 1 – Funding organisations and entrepreneurial support
Moderation: Michael Krohn, Head of Master of Arts in Design at ZHdK
and Jan Eckert, Head of Master of Arts in Design at HSLU

2:00 PM

Welcome, Anne-Catherine Sutermeister, Head of Research, HEAD – Genève

2:15 PM

Marco Vencato, Deputy Director,
«First Ventures» – Support Programme for UAS Graduates, Gebert Rüf Stiftung

2:30 PM

Marius Disler, Business Designer & Founder,
From an Observation to a Start-up, mikafi – home roasting for everyone
Gebert Rüf Stiftung Bref – «first venture» grant, HKB

2:45 PM

Andréa Muller, Responsible for international delegations Design
Supporting Design at Pro Helvetia, Pro Helvetia

3:00 PM

Discussion

3:15 PM

Emilie Zermatten, Scientific Officer
«BRIDGE – Proof of Concept» joint program SNSF/ Innosuisse
Swiss National Science Foundation (SNSF)

3:30 PM

Cassandre Poirier-Simon, Interaction Designer, Myth_n,
and Anne-Catherine Sutermeister, Head of Research, Citoyens Mitoyens,
the Place of Others in the City. A Serious Game to Fight Against Roma Stereotypes,
funded by Innosuisse, EESP Lausanne, HEAD – Genève and partners

3:45 PM

Discussion

4:00 PM

Coffee break

PART 2 – Alumni engaged in Research
Moderation: Michael Krohn, Head of Master of Arts in Design at ZHdK
and Anne-Catherine Sutermeister, Head of Research at HEAD – Genève

4:30 PM

Constance Delamadeleine, PhD Researcher,
‹Les Suisses de Paris’ or the Making of a Parisian Switzerland (1945-1975), SNF (Synergia),
ZHdK/Zurich University of the Arts, Switzerland | HEAD – Genève/University Lausanne

4:45 PM

Simon Mager, Graphic Designer and co-Founder of Omnigroup,
Assistant Researcher, Words Form Language On Eugen Gomringer, Typography and Concrete Poetry,
DNP Foundation for Cultural Promotion, ECAL

5:00 PM

Kalil Klouche, Researcher in Human-Computer Interaction,
Supporting information exploration through interaction design, Department of Computer Science,
University of Helsinki/ Department of Media, Aalto University

5:15 PM

Discussion

5:30 PM

Drinks and networking

CONFERENCE 15 NOV. 2018
Building H – Le Cube

8:45 AM

Registration and welcome coffee

9:30 AM

Jean-Pierre Greff, Director and Lysianne Léchot-Hirt, Dean of Studies, HEAD – Genève

9:45 AM

3 Presentations 10' & Discussion

Future Fossils
Alina Frieske, ECAL

Stackability – A Principle of Modern Design
Luisa Kahlfeldt, ECAL

Digital Senses:
Awareness of our Interactions with Digital Objects
Naz Naddaf, FHNW

10:30 AM

3 Presentations 10' & Discussion

Outrage!
Simon Pinkas, HEAD – Genève

The Meaning Of… – an Exploration of Shared Literacies
Miriam Hempel, ZHdK

The Affect Techniques used by the Islamic State
in Photographs of Self-Representation
for the Purposes of Mobilisation of Young Adults
Maria Mahdessian, HKB

11:15 AM

Coffee break

11:45 AM

3 Presentations 10' & Discussion

How Real is Real Enough?
The Role of Design in Virtual Reality Studies
Jonas Christen, HKB

InSecurity – Sensitize for Objects of Politics of Fear
Alena Hausruckinger, ZHdK

When Design meets Science – White Wood a case study
Meri Tuuli Zirkelbach, HSLU

12:30 PM

3 Presentations 10' & Discussion

Poetic Materials – How Information is Emotionally Expressed
by Interactive Materials
Frederik Baumann, HSLU

Wicked Fabrics – Textile Electronic Tenderness
Sophie Stephanie Kellner, FHNW

Good Vibrations
Helena Bosch Vidal, HEAD – Genève

1:15 PM

Lunch break and workshop registration

2:30 PM

Workshops

5:00 PM

Anne-Catherine Sutermeister, wrap-up and closing of the JRC

Building H – Le Cube

5:15 PM

Party with «Dfind (DNH)» – from Lausanne

Building H – Le Cube

Workshops

Future Fossils – Memory devices

Frieske, Alina

ECAL

We will search for new translations about the digitalization of our data. How do we see our personal imprint and what will change in the future? The aim is to look for new concepts on how to visualize the information that can be traced about us and envision new languages, codes and ordering systems.

R.02 (design room), building H

Forms that stack

Kahlfeldt, Luisa

ECAL

Together with the participants of the workshop, we will undertake a formal, three-dimensional exercise in stackability. An exercise inspired by the tasks given to students at the HfG Ulm, with the aim to think not only of isolated forms but to also train three-dimensional thinking.

1.14, building E

Making Conceptual Digital Objects Tangible

Naddaf, Naz

FHNW

Digital interfaces consist of metaphorical, referenced, or imagined ‘objects’ that help us navigate and complete tasks on our computers or smartphones. Some of these objects are borrowed from our material world, but others are merely concepts; they are sensation-less, and their existence is purely pixel. What happens when these objects leave their comfortable digital space and enter our material world? What is its size, what is it made of, and how do we interact with it? Does it still retain its original function, and does it have any feedback? During the workshop, we will address these questions through making three-dimensional mockups of these now-physical objects.

2.05, building H

This is your brain on outrage

Pinkas, Simon

HEAD

I propose that the increase in expression of moral outrage we can see on social media can be explained by three separate but complimentary mechanisms. In this (mostly theoretical) workshop we will explore each one them. First, we will recreate a game-theoretical experiment about costly signalling and discuss its ramifications. Next, we will look at excerpts from different cable news shows and discover the characteristics of Outrage as a genre. Finally, we will discuss an online outrage story and see how social media has changed the way we express ourselves.

3.13, building H

Describing our world(s) afresh!

Hempel, Miriam

ZHdK

Linguistic simplification is on the rise, and works for political discourses, ideological propaganda, hasty conclusions, and communication via mass media. How do we describe our world(s) afresh?
In this workshop we will re-visit socio-political terms whose substance has degenerated into hollow notions. Through collective thinking, active listening and inquisitive exchange we want to look well beyond the typical notions of common parlance! Typographic tools will facilitate and stimulate this exploratory, unexpected and playful dialogue. No experience needed, just curious mindedness!

R02 (design room), building H

The Islamic State Appropriation of Photographs from Popular Visual Aesthetics and Historical Imagery for the Purposes of Self-Representation

Mahdessian, Maria

HKB

The Islamic State (IS) has the most sophisticated jihadi imagery ever yet. This begs the question, «what affect techniques (intended impact) does the IS use in its photographs of self-representation, to communicate with its young adult audience, and to mobilize them?» In this workshop, you will try to find answers while comparing pre-selected IS self-representing photos (no graphic violence) to popular visual culture as well as historical imagery and iconic photographs. Different input from different design disciplines is highly encouraged.

Le Cube (coursive), building H

Design for studies in virtual reality

Christen, Jonas

HKB

Virtual reality (VR) is increasingly being used as a tool for psychological studies as it allows to create simulated worlds under controlled conditions. But how are these virtual worlds designed? And how much do the results of the studies depend on design decisions? In this workshop, we’ll look at how VR is used in research today. We will have a chance to look at existing virtual worlds and analyse how their look, materiality and other design decisions influence the level of immersion and the emotions provoked. Finally, we will critically evaluate the studies that future technologies in VR enable.

EL-GA (Georges Addor), building E

Security 2050 – We speculate about the future of security

Hausruckinger, Alena

ZHdK

The phenomenon of the increasing desire for safety and security in society fascinates me. In my opinion, the fast growth of the markets for products and services to make people feel safer, is constructed by the rise of populism, the influence of media and economic turbulences. My workshop provides a fascinating overview on the different dimensions of security and the dominating strategies to drive future security concepts. Together with you I want to speculate about the future of security and design our visions towards Security 2050: What products are we going to use? What stories are we going to tell?

2.14, building H

Design meets Science

Zirkelbach, Meri Tuuli

HSLU D&K

In the «Design meets Science» workshop, participants will first gain insights into the project «White Wood» a collaboration between Lucerne University of Applied Sciences and Arts, ETH Zurich and Empa Dübendorf. The workshop is based upon five exercises/scenarios focusing five different roles that designers might assume in a collaboration with scientists. The workshop’s aim is to step into the different roles and work out an independent solution for the given scenario. In order to do so, rapid prototypes will be created, tinkered with, sketched out, discussed together and evaluated during a final presentation.

Le Cube, building H

Poetic materials for your future car interior

Baumann, Frederik

HSLU D&K

What is your vision of future car interiors? How would you like to interact with autonomous cars and artificial intelligence? What do you think of materialized interfaces that connect the digital with the tactile world? After discussing these questions we will classify existing material samples regarding their poetic and emotional yet functional potential. Then we will develop scenarios for activities in the autonomous car and work hands-on to create our 1:1 future car interior and visualize our ideas and visions of poetic materials using paper and cardboard.

IRAD meeting room, building H

Wicked Fabrics – how to create textile electronic tenderness

Kellner, Sophie Stephanie

FHNW

Wicked Fabrics are handcrafted objects out of textile and electronical components. When moved or touched they can sense and react in their own special way and therefore seem to have their own characters depending on their visual appearance and functionality. Together we will explore this exciting media combination and experiment with it in a humorous way. You will sew and solder and create your tender object out of fabric, conductive materials and electronic components.

R.02 (design room), building H

Good Vibrations

Bosch Vidal, Helena

HEAD

How do sexual objects turn into shape? The vibratory object was created as a medical tool to treat hysteria at the end of the nineteenth century. Due to a sexual and subversive use of it, the purpose of the device switched from medical tool to sex toy along the history. According to the American psychologist J. J. Gibson, an object is whatever one can make of it. Following this idea, we will redesign objects around us and transform them into self-sexual pleasure devices. Design objects, photograph them, draw them, use them and misuse them.

1.20, building H

Information

Wednesday the 14th

Lucerne

10:00 AM

Geneva

1:00 PM

Zurich

10:32 AM

Geneva

1:18 PM

Bern

11:04 AM

Geneva

1:00 PM

Renens

12:05 PM

Geneva

12:45 PM

Basel

10:03 AM

Geneva

12:45 PM

Thursday the 15th

Lucerne

5:54 AM

Geneva

8:45 AM

Zurich

6:03 AM

Geneva

8:45 AM

Bern

6:34 AM

Geneva

8:18 AM

Renens

7:32 AM

Geneva

8:21 AM

Basel

6:03 AM

Geneva

8:45 AM

Bus

Then by bus from Geneva main station Cornavin

Bus stop «Guye»
Bus 10, direction Airport
Bus 19 / 6, direction Vernier-Village

Register

The registration for the Junior Design Research Conference 2018 is currently closed.

Contact

Nouveau Campus HEAD
Bâtiment H
Avenue de Châtelaine 7
1203 Genève

022 388 51 00
info.head@hesge.ch